Skip to main content

Full text of "Quincy Sun July - Dec 1993"

See other formats





incy Supplement 



i:vi;vi> 




John Adams 



John Quincy Adams 




VOL.25 No. 41 



•2 Sections, 48 Pages 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 




Proponents, Opponents Heard 
On Huge West Quincy Project 

Traffic, Jobs 

Issues At 
Store Hearing 

By BILL DONCASTER 

"Braintree gets the taxes and Quincy gets the 
traffic," was the cry of many Quincy residents 
Monday at a City Council public hearing on a $10 
million home improvement retail store proposed in 
West Quincy at the Braintree line. 
The 104,000 square foot citing the need for jobs in 



REMEMBERING A CLASSMATE: A tree planting 
ceremony was recently held on the grounds of the 
Lincoln-Hancock Community School in memory of the 
late Paul Gauthier. One of Paul's friends, Bryan 
McCarthy (at podium) speaks on their friendship as 



Paul's mother, Shirley, and school Principal Dennis 
Carini, left, listen. Paul died last winter after a long 
illness. The flowering plum tree was dedicated in his 
memory. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Downtown Ammunition License Denied 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

A request to open a 
fishing, camping and 
hunting store at 14 Cottage 
Ave., Quincy Center, was 
denied Tuesday by the 
Quincy License Boaid. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen and other board 
members said they had too 
many reservations about 
granting an ammunition 
license at the site. 

"That particular 
location, I'm not 
comfortable with (an 



ammunition license 
there)," said Mullen. "It's 
a safety thing." 

Health Commissioner 
Jane Gallahue expressed 
similar sentiments. 

"I agree with the 
chief," she said. "I'm 
opposed to this Ucense." 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman said he would 
only support an 
ammunition Ucense at the 
site if guns could be 
purchased only through a 
catalog at the store. 



Bethany Pastor Resigns 
After Stormy Ministry 



Rev. Roger Ketcham 
has resigned as pastor of 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center, 
after a near two-year 
ministry, the last half of it 
marked by controversy. 

Rev. Ketcham sub- 
mitted his resignation 
Saturday and it was 
accepted by members of 
the church Sunday. 

Church officials had 
little or no comment on 
the resignation or the 
reason for it. 

But other church 
sources said the resig- 
nation came to a head in 
the wake of several stomiy 



months during which some 
members of the church 
expressed dissatisfaction 
with Rev. Ketcham 's 
perfonnance as pastor. 

He was on a probation 
period. 

It was also learned that 
the vote on the separation 
agreement between Rev. 
Ketcham and the church 
was 155 for and eight 
against. 

One church member 
described the church as a 
"house divided" during the 
controversy leading up to 
the resignation. 

Asked for comment 
when reached at his 



Bill Spinks from Bay 
State Community Services 
at 15 Cottage Ave. and 
Mitch Finnegan from 
Impact Quincy, which is 
located at the same 
address, also spoke against 
the hcense at the meeting. 
Spinks, whose 

organizations assists 
people who have had 
alcoholic, drug or family 
abuse problems, said he 
would feel uncomfortable 
with a guns being sold 
across the street from the 
door his clients use as 
entry and exit. 

Finnegan, who said that 

there is a "connection in 

many people's minds 

between guns and 

violence," said he would 

_ . ., „. be concerned about an 

Squanto Rd., Menymount ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^eing 



The board also received 
a letter from the Quincy 
Center Business and 
Professional Association 
which stated that while the 
QCBPA "accepts the 
concept of a sporting 
goods store in Quincy 
Center," it also has 
"serious reservations to the 
sale of firearms." The 
board had continued the 
matter from its previous 
meeting mainly to solicit 
the QCBPA 's opinion 
regarding the request. 



Home Quarters store 
proposes to build on the 
Quincy-Braintree line 
between Willard and 
Rockdale Sts., about S 
acres in Quincy, 10 in 
Braintree. The store and 
all the paricing will be on 
the Braintree side. The 
driveway will be in 
Quincy, opening onto 
Willard St. 

Tom Southworth, of 
Home Quarters, estimated 
that the project will create 
roughly 200 contruction 



the area, and saying the 
success of the Home 
Depot store, also on 
Willard St., is an example 
of how this project can 
work as well. 

About 10 people spoke 
or were recorded as being 
in favor of the project, 
most of those were union 
laborers. 

Residents speaking 
against cited an already 
congested Willard St. as 
reasons to stop the project. 
Some cited traffic during 
peak hours from the 



jobs for the two years it 

will take to complete and Cinema at the South Shore 

200 more retail jobs after Plaza in Braintree and talk 



completion. 



of a second floor to that 



Ronald lacobucci, of mall as being of major 
the South Shore Building concern. Roughly 20 



Trades Council, spoke in 
support of the project 



people were recorded as 

(Cont'd on Page J 0^ 



• ^ 



pf WT ^9 TW p^ 



home by The Sun Monday, 

(Cont'd on Page] 4) 



(Cont'd on Page 14) 



Early News Deadline 
For Next Week's Sun 



Because of the Inde- 
pendence Day holiday 
Monday, there is an early 
news deadline for next 
week's issue of The 
Quincy Sun. 

News, sports and 
church releases should be 
in the Sun office, 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy Cen- 



ter, by 5 p.m. tomorrow 
(Friday) lo ensure pubhca- 
tion in theMy 8th edition 
The office will be 
closed Monday, July 5th 
and reopen Tuesday, Jul> 
6th at 9 a.m. 

The Sun wishes every 
one a sate and happy hoU- 
day 



July 4th Holiday Activities 

Merrymount 
July 3: Miss Merrymount Pageant, 6 p.m. 
July 4: Parade and Field Day, 1 p.m. 
Merrymount Beach, sponsored 
by the Merrymount Association 
Quincy Point 
July 3: Band Concert, 5 to 7 p.m. 
July 5: Field Day, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Fore River Field, sponsored 
by the Ward 2 Civic Association 
Squantum 
July 5: Parade at 10 a.m., activities at 1 p.m. 
Wendell Moses Playground, sponsored 
by the Squantum 4th of July Committee 
Germantown 
July 4: Various activities, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
at General Palmer Park sponsored by 
the Harborview Residents Committee 
July 5: Field Day, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Baker Beach, sponsored by 
the Baker Beach Association 



I'aj{«? 



Quint V Sun Thursday, July 1, 1^5 




MAYOR JAMES SHEETS (right) was among those who paid tribute to outgoing library 
director Warren Watson at a recent celebration at The Neighborhood Club. Watson will 
retire Friday after serving as director of the Thomas Crane Public Library for 25 years. 

'I'm Going To Miss This' 

Warren Watson Closes 
Chapter On Library Career 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

One might think that 
Warren Watson is leaving 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library because he's tired 
of looking at so many 
books. 

But Watson, 68, who 
will retire Friday after 
serving as the library's 
director for 25 years, says 
that isn't the case at all. 

"I still read 
voraciously," said Watson, 
adding that "I always have 
a book by the bed." One of 
the best parts of woiking at 
the Crane Ubrary, he said, 
is that everyone on staff 
reads so much that 
employees are constantly 
introducing each other to 
the works of different 
authors. 

"We all get so excited 
about it," he said. "I'm 
going to miss this." 

Watson said the reason 
for his retirement is 
something far simpler. 

"I just thought it was 
time to go," he said, "and 
to make way for younger 
and more energetic 
leadership." 

That leadership will be 
provided by Ann 
McLaughlin, 44, who has 
served as assistant library 
director for the past 10 
years. Watson noted that 
McLaughlin's considerable 
experience, good 
relationship with the 
library's Board of Trustees, 
and hard work in 
establishing the library's 
literacy program make her 
the ideal person to 
succeed him. 

"As far as I'm 
concerned, the library 
couldn't be in better 
hands," he said. "I'm sure 
it will prosper." 

Not that it has done 
badly under Watson, a 
1943 graduate of North 
Quincy High School who 
received bachelor's (1948) 
and master's (1950) 
degrees from Boston 
College and did news and 
editorial work for nearly 10 
years before beginning his 
library career in 1959. He 
worked at the Boston 



Public Library and the 
Boston College library 
and, after receiving a 
degree in library and 
informational science from 
Simmons College in 1962, 
became assistant director 
of the Framingham Public 
Library. 

In December 1965, he 
was promoted to the 
position of library director 
in Framingham. Finally, 
he was named director of 
the Crane library in March 
1968. 

The work he has done 
over the years, he said, 
has left him with a great 
feeling of accomplishment. 

"As far as the work is 
concerned, there is almost 
daily gratification derived 
from being in a public 
library," he said. "There is 
such a variety of different 
needs to be addressed— 
children's services, 
popular reading, 

recreational and 

information services— that's 
what gives us the 
satisfaction." 

Watson said he is proud 
of the improvements made 
at the library in the years 
he has been director, since 
the needs of the reading 
public are constantly 
changing. 

"Accessibility (of 
books) has improved 
because of what we call 
'output measure,'" he said. 
"We concentrate more on 
what the public's getting 
than bow to get the 
materials. We also count 
turnover, the ratio between 
how many books the 
library has and how they 
are circulated, as well as 
the amount of time it takes 
a person to receive a 
book." 

Improvements in 
automated services in 
recent years have also 
helped improve the 
library's efficiency, 
Watson said. 

"These are things that 
have developed during my 
time that are all to the 
good," he said. "More and 
more material is available 
to more people when they 



need it." 

Personally, however, 
what has touched him 
most is watching his staff 
members go on to bigger 
and better things. Watson 
has appointed all of the 38 
Crane employees currently 
on staff, and noted that at 
least four of his former 
employees have gone on 
to become library directors 
in other communities. 

"My greatest internal 
satisfaction has come from 
my relationship with the 
staff, and my opportunity 
to encourage them to 
develop," he said. "I've 
hired some talented people 
over the years, and I've 
tried my best to give them 
a httle support." 

Watson was recently 
honored for his many years 
in library administration by 
friends and colleagues at a 
celebration at the 
Neighborhood Club. 

"I was very wanned by 
the kinds of comments 
they made," he said. 
"They had a lot of nice 
things to say." Watson 
also recently received best 
wishes from the public at a 
reception held at the 
library and from the City 
Council, who presented 
him with a certificate of 
appreciation. 

Watson said he will 
continue to serve as an 
advisor to the library and 
on a planning and 
development committee 
which will begin meeting 
in the fall to discuss plans 
for a new library addition. 
Watson added that he 
would like to see the 
addition project, which 
will cost $5 to $7 million, 
"seriously underway" in 
the next five years. 

Other than that, 
however, Watson said he 
and his wife Elizabeth, 
who reside in Squantum, 
will be taking things one 
day at a time in the future. 

"I have no single grand 
plan for retirement," he 
said. "We'll work on our 
own timetable, which I 
like." 



WARREN WATSON, who is retiring from the Thomas Crane Public Library after 

serving as its director for 25 years, shakes hands with his successor, Ann McLaughlin, 

at a recent celebration in Watson's honor at The Neighborhood Club. At right is 

Watson's wife, Elizabeth. .^ . „ i. . . ,. ^ 

(i^uincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

Restaurant, License Board 

Reach Compromise On 
Extending Weekend Hours 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

In a compromise 
reached with The Pilgrim 
Restaurant, 1472 Hancock 
St., The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday agreed to 
extend the restaurant's 
closing time on Thursdays, 
Fridays and Saturdays an 
additional six hours 

Owner Richard Carriger 
told the board he wanted 
to keep the restaurant open 
24 hours a day on 
Thursdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays, saying that 
there are a number of 
people in the area who 



work late and would like a 
place to eat. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen, however, told 
Carriger that other 
businesses such as the 
International House of 
Pancakes at Washington 
Street and McGrath 
Highway have made 
similar requests but were 
told they must conform to 
a late-night closing. 
Mullen said the same 
should be done with The 
Pilgrim Restaurant "just to 
be consistent," telling 
Carriger his feelings were 



nothing personal. 

Building Inspector 
Matthias Mulvey agreed, 
calling Carriger "a fine 
person," and made a 
motion that the restaurant, 
which normally closes at 8 
p.m., be allowed to extend 
its closing time on 
Thursdays, Fridays and 
Saturdays to 2 a.m. 

Carriger agreed to the 
extension and, at Mulvey 's 
suggestion, said he would 
report back to the board in 
September to inform them 
on how the new schedule 
is working out. 



New Restaurant To Open 
At Former Bentley's Site 



The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday granted a 
request from Gilesin 
Enterprises, Inc. to open a 
new restaurant at the site 
of the former Bentley's 
Sports Club and Grill. 

The matter had been 

continued fi^om the board's 

previous meeting because 

of its policy of reviewing 

all requests for All- 

AlcohoUc and/or Common 

Victualer Licenses twice. 

Applicant Kevin Gill was 

granted both licenses by 

the board. 

Police Chief Francis 



Mullen said he 
recommended a closing 
time of midnight at the 
site, and also that gates be 
installed at the site "to 
prevent disturbance" and 
that Gill's request for two 
pool tables at the 
restaurant be denied. 

"I just don't think it's 
necessary (to have pool 
tables)," said Mullen. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea, 
however, suggested that 
the board grant Gill's 
request for a closing time 
of 1 p.m. 

"I just think it's very 
hard to be competitive 



when almost everyone else 
is closing at one o'clock," 
said Shea, the board 
chairman. 

Other board members 
agreed with Shea, saying 
that 1 p.m. should be the 
closing time and that the 
two pool tables should be 
allowed. Board members 
also agreed with Mullen, 
however, that gates would 
be installed at the site and 
that Entertainment and 
Video Licenses, neither of 
which had been requested 
by Gill, would be allowed 
at the site. 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy License 
Board took the following 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
The Merrymount PTO 
(Elaine Dwyer) for a 
permit to hold a Fall 
Festival fundraiser 
Saturday, Oct. 2 fi-om 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. (Oct. 3. rain 
date). 

•Granted a request from 
the Merrymount 

Association (Jeanne 
Reardon) for a one day 
liquor license for its 
annual Fourth of July 
Celebration Saturday, July 
3 from 6 to 11 p.m. 

•Granted a request from 



the North Quincy Football 
Boosters (Kevin Kelly)for 
a permit to conduct a 
Canning Drive Nov. 4-6. 

•Granted a request from 
Horizons for Youth (Clive 
Beasley) for a two-day 
permit to hold a fiind- 
raising food sampling and 
entertainment show 
entitled "Taste of the 
South Shore" Saturday and 
Sunday, Aug. 7-8 from 
noon to 6 p.m. on Hancock 
St. from Granite to School 
Sts.; also, for a three day 
Beer and Wine License to 
be used for the event and 
for a press conference and 
reception the Friday before 
the event near City Hall. 



•Granted a request from 
the Quincy Post American 
Legion, 2 Mechanic St. for 
a change of managers from 
Robert L. Bannister to 
Albeit Marobella. 

•Granted a request from 
The Children's Carousel, 
68 Billings Rd. for a 
Second-hand license. 

•Granted a request from 
The Atlantic Neighborhood 
Center, Hunt St., for a 
permit to hold a Flea 
Market Saturday, July 10. 

•Granted a request from 
Atlantic House, 338 
Washington St., for a 
permit to hold a Car Wash 
Saturday, July 10 from 10 
a.m. to 3 pjn. 



X 



r 



Thursday* Julj 1> 1993 Quiacy Sun Page 3 



Council Approves 
$7.8 Million Bond Issue 



Councillors Petition State 
To OK Kelson Salary 



By BILL DONCASTER 

On Monday the Quincy 
City Council voted to float 
a $7.8 million dollar bond 
package which was 
submitted by Mayor James 
Sheets earlier this month. 

The package includes 
bond issues for the 
renovations on the city's 
school's and other public 
buildings, departmental 
equipment, seawall 
repairs, sewers and drains 
and other matters. 

Only one item was not 
passed, a $265,000 fire 
and police 

communications bond, 
which was referred back to 



the finance committee. 

Accoring to Thomas 
Koch, executive secretary 
to the mayor, that money 
will be used with the 
Enhanced 911 system to 
be intalled in 1994. He 
said there was no hurry to 
issue the bond as Quincy 
will be submitting a plan 
for the system next week. 

Councillors Bruce 
Ayers and Michael 
Cheney both praised the 
$1.15 million for 
construction of new 
seawalls in Squantum. 
They and Councillor 
Joseph Laraia said that for 
years the city has been 



using a "band aid" 
approach in combatting 
erosion. 

This appropriation, they 
said, will do much to 
improve the impact of 
storms along the shoreline. 
A $200,000 bond was 
issued to purchase new 
water meters, at roughly 
$75 apiece, to replace 
defective ones so that 
billing could be more 
accurate. 

There was little other 
discussion since all the 
items had been discussed 
at lenght at prior meeting, 
said chairman of the 
Finance Committee, Tim 
Cahill. 



Complaint Filed Over 
Alleged Noise Violations 



Quincy Building 
Inspector Matthias Mulvey 
filed a complaint in 
Quincy District Court on 
Monday regarding alleged 
noise ordinance violations 
at Interstate Distributors, 
Inc., in Squantum. 

Mulvey filed the 
complaint in response to 
years of complaints from 
residents of the SeaWinds 
Condominiums on Quincy 
Shore Drive. Some 
residents of the building 
say they are disturbed by 
late night and early 
morning noise from 
loading and unloading of 
trucks. 

There will be a show- 
cause hearing on July 13, 
when the courts will 
determine whether the 
case warrants a trial. 

Mulvey said he also 
suggested that residents of 
SeaWinds hire a lawyer to 
file a civil suit against 
Interstate Distributors. 
Since it is an ordinance, 
the most the city can do is 
issue a $100 fine for each 
violation, which may not 
be enough to get them to 
stop operating at night. 



Peter Eleey, an attorney 
for Interstate, has said 
recently that Interstate has 
no intention of ceasing 
night work, due to the 
timely nature of their 
business, distributing 
periodicals, night and 
morning activity is 
necessary. 

He's also said that any 
attempt to stop it may be 
in violation of the First 
Amendment, which 
protects the freedom of the 



press, including 

distribution of literature. 

Mulvey is also 
investigating into whether 
or not Interstate has been 
issued a 'commercial 
hauling license," which 
was brought up by Nancy 
Maule McNally, an 
attorney who lives in 
SeaWinds. 

If they are not licensed, 
Mulvey said, the city may 
be able to be more 
effective about curbing 
late night activity. 




AYERS* 

CAN WE HELP YOU 

DRIVING EQUIPMENT FOR THE 
PHYSICALLY CHALLENGED 



BRUCE AYCR8 



HANDICAPPED V 



•N«w and Used Vans 
for modilications 

• Us«d Demos 

• All Popular Ufts 

• Hand Controls 

• Rjased Roofs 
•Drop Floors 

• Wheelchair Ti-downs' 

• Power Seat 

• Handicap Rental Vans 



Call or write for 
Free 
Brochure 




440B East Squantum Street 
Quincy, MA 02171 



328-0056 



BRENNAN'S 

fine tobacco • cigarettes • lottery 

Name Brand Cigarettes 

Only $2.21 per pack + tax 

Many Brands as low as 

$ 1 .45 per pack + tax 



^^^^^^^^^ 



In Store Lottery Raffle 

stop in for details 
No Purchase Necessary 



Hours: Mon-Sat 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sun 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Two convenient locations 

1 442 Hancock St 1 255 River St 

Quir^cy Square Cleary Square 

61 7-786-8610 Quincy Square 

617-361-1444 Cleary Square, Hyde Park 



By BILL DONCASTER 

Ward 1 Councillor 
Peter Kolson hasn't been 
paid for his work as a city 
councillor. 

City Council passed a 
home nile petition Monday 
night so that he can. 

The petition must first 
go to the mayor, then, if 
signed by him voted on by 
the state legislature and 
signed by the governor. 

Kolson hasn't drawn the 
$10,000 city councillor's 
salary in the four years 
he's been in office due to a 
conflict of interest law the 
prohibits a housing 
authority employee from 
collecting a salary. 

Kolson is a building 
maintenance supervisor for 
the Quincy Housing 
Authority. 

Councillor Michael 
Cheney and other 

councillors would like to 
see an exception made in 
his favor because his 
salary is paid through state 




PETER KOLSON 

and federal funds, and they 
see no conflict of interest. 
"We've looked into it 
and there would be nothing 
wrong with him getting 
paid," Ward 2 Councillor 
Ted DeCristofaro said. 

According to City 
Auditor Robert Foy, 
Kolson does not draw any 
salary from the city, and 
would not be eligible to 
receive any sort of pension 
from the city. 

"This exception would 
just allow him to take a 



salary for a job he's 
already doing," said Ward 
3 Councillor Lawrence 
Chretien. 

Councillor Joe Laraia 
said before voting that he 
would like to see a 
petition or something else 
showing Kolson's 
constituents feelings on 
the matter. He said 
Kolson's not drawing a 
salary might have been a 
factor in voting for him for 
some. He later voted in 
favor. 

"He earns his money as 
much as we do," said 
DeCristofaro, "maybe 
more, I don't know. There 
is nothing ethically wrong 
with this, it is proper." 

Kolson said be would 
like to collect the salary, 
but it would not be a factor 
in seeking re-election. 

"It would certainly be a 
help to my family," said 
Kolson, he estimated that 
he spends 30 to 35 hours to 
week in woik related to his 
Council position. 



Stores That Are Open, Closed 
In Quincy This Holiday Weekend 



With the Independence 
Day holiday falling on a 
Sunday this year. Police 
Chief Francis Mullen 
announces what Quincy 
stores will be allowed to 



open and what stores will 
be closed during the 
holiday weekend. 

Retail stores and 
supermarkets may open 
Sunday, July 4th but will 



be closed Monday, July 
5th. 

Liquor stores will not 
open Sunday but will be 
allowed to open Monday 
under state law. 



NOW OPEN 





KIVER 



NEIGHBORHOOD 
EATERY 



Selections from our Menu 
Garden Greens 

• Ceasar's Salad • Grilled Chicken Salad 

Burgers & Sandwiches 

• 10 oz. Basic Burger • Prime Rib Sandwich 

Little Italy 

• Pizza • Sauteed Chicken Broccoli & Ziti 

Appetizers 

• Ultimate Nachos • Buffalo Wings 

• Fried Chicken Wings • Fried Zuccini 

Charbroiled Specialties 

• Steak Tips • Baby Back Ribs 

• Pork Chops • Roast Prime Rib of Beef 

The Daily Catch 

• Native Broiled Schrod • Broiled Scallops 



Fish & Chips 



Fried Seafood Platter 



Daily Lunch and Dinner Specials^ 



(617) 479-2400 

520 Washington Street, Quincy 



Page 4 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



OPINION 



iv^±z 



••tV:-' 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co inc 

1372 Hancock SI , Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jf Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh Editor 



30( p«r copy. $12.00 p«r y«ar by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par year by mail outslda Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 'i7l-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St Quincy, Mass 02169 



The Oumcy Sun aasumes nc linancial responsib.iily tor 
typographica' errors in idvenisemenls but mil repnni that 
pan ol an atjvenserrenl in whicfi the typographical error 
occurs 



'"A^- 



Readers Forum 



The Class Of 1930 
A Class To Remember 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

The oldsters continue to 
care about the youngsters. 
In 1980, the 1930 
graduates of Quincy High 
School celebrated their 
50th anniversary. They 
decided to establish a 
scholarship fund for future 
Quincy High School and 
Vo-Tech graduates. 

A committee of 14 was 
formed to carry out this 
decision. In 1985, it was 
decided to include North 
Quincy High. 

Enthusiastic 
contributions to the fund 
continued to pour in from 
all over the country. 

The fund was carefully 
managed by the late 
James Walsh and since his 
death, by Jimmy 
McGuiness and Gerry 
Gherardi. Scholarships 
went from $200 each to 
$500 each. 

But now, in 1993, the 
members are in their early 
80's and feeling the 



burdens of their years, so 
the committee reluctantly 
decided to collect no more 
contributions. The fund, 
now $12,000, has been 
placed into the care of 
Quincy High School's 
principal, Lloyd Hill. He 
will continue to give out 
$1,500 a year from this 
fund to graduates of 
Quincy High School, The 
Center for Technical 
Education, and North 
Quincy High School; each 
candidate to get $500 for 
as long as the fund lasts. 

In this way, the 
scholarship will go on into 
the next century, and 
perhaps, memorialize the 
graduates of 1930. 

It is hoped that other 
alumni groups will try the 
project, too. It has been 
very worthwhile. 

M. Teresa Harcourt 

Quincy High Class of 1930 

22 Pequot Rd. Quincy 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C. 




COPING WTTH OSTEOARTHRmS 

Osteoarthritis, or OA, about 1250 B.C., when it 



occurs when the cartilage 
that acts as a cushion be- 
tween the ends of bones 
becomes worn or pitted. 
Although this form of ar- 
thritis is not generally as 
severe as some other 
types, it can be extremely 
painful. Besides the joint 
discomfort of OA, it can 
also result in pieces of bone 
being chipf>ed off as bones 
rub against each other. The 
disease may develop 
slowly, starting on one side 
of the body or in a particular 
joint. It is usually charac- 
terized by only slight 
swelling or sensation of 
heat in the affected joint. 
There is no cure, but OA 
can be managed with a 
comprehensive approach 
including education, treat- 
ment for joint damage, and 
coping techniques for 
stress and pain. 
P.S. Osteoarthritis has 
been around at least sirx:e 



is known to have plagued 
Egypt's Pharaoh Ramses 
II. 

Patients suffering from 
chronically painful condi- 
tions like osteoarthritis of- 
ten find relief using the 
tools of meditation and 
biofeedback. If you would 
like to learn more about 
this topic, or about how 
you can help prevent heart 
disease, call COMPRE- 
HENSIVE CARDIAC 
CARE at 472-2550. When 
treating patients, I always 
try to consider how I would 
like myself, my wife and 
children or my parents to 
be treated by a doctor. 
Office hours are by ap- 
pointment, and our new, 
more comfortable office 
is located in Crown 
Colony, 700 Congress St., 
Suite 2C, in Quincy. I am 
affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Ervin Drops Out 



A 



s it turns out, Martin Ervin will be voting for 
Mayor James Sheets this year instead of running 
against him. 





Ervin will officially withdraw from 
the mayor's race today (Thursday) in 
a letter to City Qerk Joseph Shea. He 
had already filed nomination papers. 
Ervin, who is 23 and would have 
been the first black candidate for any ervin 
elective public office, says he is getting out because of 
personal and not political reasons. 

"There are a lot of personal reasons for my deci- 
sion," he says. "It doesn't have anything to do with 
politics. My personal life is very dear to me." 
Now that he won' t be achallenger, would he vote for 
Sheets? 

"Yes, ru vote for Jim Sheets," 
he says. "He's a gentleman. He's got 
to be the nicest politician I've ever 
met." 

Ervin first met and talked with 
SHEETS Sheets in the latter' s office a few 
weeks ago and came away impressed. 

Among the subjects he discussed with Sheets was 
the need for youth centers. He feels Sheets will now 
make that one of his priorities for the futile. 

Ervin says he plans to become more active in the 
community especially involving the needs of youth. 

And, he says, he plans o retiun to the political scene 
as a candidate two years from now. 

"This," he says, "is only the begiiming for me." 

U 
A READER HAS some thoughts of his own regard- 
ing the recent suggestion here by Ward 4 City Council- 
lor Tom Fabrizio that the new Early Childhood Center 
to be built on the site of the former Lincoln School be 
named after late Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa. 

In offering a niunber of reasons why the honor 
would be appropriate, Fabrizio noted that Delia Chiesa 
was bom in a house at 43 Rodman St., just a stone's 
throw away from the old Lincoln School which he 
attended. 

Not quite so, says Alfred Benedetti of 73 Rodman 
St., a long-time friend and neighbor of Delia Chiesa. 
The latter lived on Rodman St. but was not bom there. 
Benedetti agrees there should be "a memorial" not 
only for Delia Chiesa but for another Rodman St. 
resident at the new school. 
Benedetti writes: 

"The article on Amelio Delia Chiesa, The Quincy 
Sun, Jime 17, the location where he was bom is not 
correct. 1 came to South Quincy in 1 903. There was no 
house at 43 Rodman St. It was an empty lot. 

"The Delia Chiesa family lived on Trafford St. and 
later built the house on Rodman St. We were neighbors 
for many years. 

Quincy Group Not Connected 
To MWRA, Officials Say 



The Massachusetts 
Water Resources Authority 
announces that it does not 
have any affiliation with a 
group soliciting money in 
Quincy and promising to 
lower water and sewer 
rates. 

Members of the group 
have been going door to 
door in Quincy soliciting 
funds. They state that 
contributions to their 
campaign will help public 
education and lobbying for 



the Boston Harbor Project, 
and more specifically, 
they speak of reducing 
water and sewer rates. 

MWRA officials 
stressed that while they 
are aware this group 
exists, there is no 
connection between the 
two, although the group 
may use the MWRA's 
name. Residents are 
advised that all MWRA 
employees carry proper 
identification. 




"The Quincy Ledger (also The Quincy Sun) had an 
article on the dedication of the North Quincy branch 
library in memory of Delia Chiesa on Sept. 7, 1986, 
Delia Chiesa bequested to the city libraries in 1975, 
$140,000. The interest was to be used to build a library 
in South Quincy. 

"Another South Quincy native, Angelo Vergobbi, 
also from Rodman St., was never in politics, left the 
city libraries $100,000. 

"Nothing that I have seen has been done for Angelo, 
except a portrait hung up high in the main library. No 
one knows who the portrait represents. 

"Both Amelio and Angelo attended the Lincohi 
School and both were generous benefactors to the city. 

"A memorial should be provided for the two men at 
the new school on the former location of the old 
Lincoln School." 

□ 

CITY COUNCILLOR Joseph LaRaia who was 
named to fill the unexpired term of 
Patricia Toland who resigned to be- 
come assistant city clerk, says he will 
get his election campaign in high gear 
this month. 

"There's a lot of new voters out 
there," he notes, indicating his plans 
to get around to them. Laraia 

LaRaia had his first fundraiser scheduled last night 
(Wednesday) at Coddington's Restaurant, Quincy Sq, 

7 to 9 p.m. Tickets were $25 per person. 

□ 
CHRISTINE CEDRONE, candidate for School 
Committee, kicks off her campaign at a fundraiser 
Tuesday, July 6, 7 to 10 p.m. at the Adams Heights 
Men's Club, Bower Rd., Quincy Point. Tickets are $1 5 
per person and may be obtained by calling 479-2217. 
They will also be available at the door. 

G 
A MEMORIAL lOK road race honoring the late 
U.S. Deputy Marshall William F. Degan of Quincy, 
will beheld Sunday, Sept. 19, beginning and ending at 
Quincy Veterans Memorial Stadium. 

Degan was killed in the line of duty in Idaho last 
August when he was gmmed down outside a fugitive's 
fortified cabin on a mountainside. 

Degan also served in the U.S. Marine Corps and held 
the rank of lieutenant colonel. 

Proceeds from the race will go to the Quincy DARE 
program and the Marine's "Toys For Tots" program, 
both of which he strongly supported. 

His wife, Karen, is honorary chairman of the plan- 
ning committee. Members include: Dan Stock, Steve 
DeRoche, Bob Winter, John Hasson, Rick Fitspatrick, 
Rich Coleman, Bill Graney and Don Donohue. 

Donations, made out to the Degan Memorial Fund, 
may be sent to P. O. Box 751, 60 Murphy Memorial 
Drive, Quincy, MA 02169. 

Ward 5 Elects Delegates For 
State Democratic Convention 

Eustis St.; Paul O'SuIlivan, 
11 West Elm Ave.; 
Christopher Bell, 677 
Quincy Shore Drive. 

Patricia Toland, 82 
Cedar St.; Michael Lydon, 
644 Hancock St.; Patricia 
Griffen, 81 Cedar St.; 
Donna Woods, 38 
Hamilton St.; Gina 
Scanlon, 15 Glendale St.; 
and alternate Jane 
Kisielius, 86 Presidents 
Ln. 



Democrats in Ward 5 in 
Quincy recently elected 10 
men and women, with one 
alternate, to represent 
them at the 1993 
Massachusetts Democratic 
Convention to be held Oct. 
16 at the Worcester 
Centrum. 

The delegates are: 
Frank CDonohue, 20 Ovel 
Rd.; Charles Phelan, 26 
Kemper St; Eric Loeb, 10 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Quincy Sun Pafc 5 



Touched By Quincy's Flag Day Parade 



{On Monday, June 14, I 
attended the Flag Day 
Parade that was held in 
Quincy. The parade and 
its audience was very 
inspiring, and I wanted to 
convey my feelings in 
writing, so the enclosed 
composition came to mind. 
I thought the organizers of 
the that parade would like 
to know that they touched 
at least one person in 
attendance, and hopefully 
your other readers were 
as moved as I was by this 
event.) 

By KATHERINE RYDER 

Flag Day is an annual 
holiday that generally 
means nothing to me. 

When I think of Flag 
Day-and I only do that 
when I notice it once a 
year on my calender- I 
reflect on it as a particular 
day of the year that is 
reserved for the thought of 
"Old Glory." Whoop-de- 
do. 

I have never 
contemplated it as an 
especially patriotic 
holiday, I mean it's 
nothing like July 4- we 
don't even get the day off! 
Honestly, I have never 
given this day much 
consideration at all. The 
way I see it, it's just one 
day out of the year when 
the population breaks out 
its American flags from 
the attic and proudly 
displays them outside- 
only to be forgotten there 
for the rest of the summer. 

On this particular Flag 
Day, the historic City of 
Quincy was hosting a Flag 
Day parade to be followed 
by a flag raising ceremony 
and fireworks display. My 
father, a Quincy 
businessman, informed me 
of this event a few days 
prior to its arrival. I took 
in the news with about as 
much enthusiasm as a 
turtle gives to a world 
crises. The only reason 
that I had given it any 
thought at all was because 
my dad told me that he 
and my mom would be 
carrying one of the flags in 
the parade. 

My day hadn't gone any 
worse than usual, but 1 
would have enjoyed a 
nice, quiet, relaxing 
evening at home which 
would have definitely 
included an early bedtime. 
All during the day, 
however, I kept thinking 
back on how excited my 
dad seemed about the 
whole event in general, 
and how when I was a kid 
both my parents always 
made an effort to see me 
march in parades (even 
the stupid little Santa 
parades through the mall), 
and I decided that I had to 
go - for them. 

My boyfriend met me in 
Quincy Center and we 
went out for some dinner 
before the occasion. Our 
meal was hardly edible, 
and between the bad food 
and the humidity in the air 
we were not the most 
joyous couple. As we 
strolled towards the parade 
route, I glanced over at the 
audience and was 
immediately disappointed 




LARGE AMERICAN FLAG is carried north on Hancock St. to Southern Artery by 
volunteers during Quincy's Flag Day Parade which attracted an estimated 60,000 
spectators. 



by its size. 

One of the things that 
truly disgusts me in this 
decade is the general 
public's total lack of 
interest in their own 
communities and 

neighborhoods. It seems 
so different from my 
parent's age when people 
looked out for one another 
and joined in local 
happenings. 

One of the reasons that 
on-lookers saddened me 
was that there seemed to 
be so few of them. I 
chalked this up to the time 
of day (7 p.m. on Monday 

evening-who could 
possibly be home?), and 
proceeded to go about 
finding a good viewing 
territory. 

Chris (my boyfriend) 
and I managed (oh, how 
difficult) to find a front 
row location, and chatted 
amongst ourselves until 
the festivities began. Our 
wait wasn't too long, and 
we finally heard the all too 
familiar strains of police 
sirens, only this time we 
didn't mind them since 
they were leading the 
happy procession. 

As the first segment of 
the parade passed by, the 
mostly disinterested 
audience members paid 
hardly any attention at all. 
There were a few clappers 
(maybe two), but in total 
individuals barely noticed 
what was right in front of 
them. 

The next pack of 
marchers came and went, 
and it was at this time I 
noticed a gentleman 
standing next to us. His 
appearance was nothing 
startling, but it was his 
actions that caught my 
attention. The troop that 
was marching by us was a 



Minuteman Corps with 
their drummers and gun 
slingers. As they came 
around the comer towards 
us my neighbor began to 
clap - loudly. I glanced 
over at him and noticed 
that he had an excited 
look on his face, one you 
might see on a young child 
at his first parade. His 
enthusiasm was infectious, 
and I began to clap for the 
marchers too. Clapping 
gave me a warm, happy 
feeling inside, and I was 
delighted that I bad been 
chosen to stand next to 
that gentleman on my 
right. 

A war veterans 
marching band was next to 
stroll by, and before we 
saw them we heard the 
music; the song was "God 
Bless America." As the 
procession made its way 
around the comer past us, 
the musicians relaxed the 
hold on their instruments 
and sang the lyrics of that 
wonderfully patriotic tune. 
The crowd that I ( and that 
very passionate man) was 
a part of broke out into 
thunderous applause 
(okay, maybe not 
thunderous, but everyone 
was clapping). Being the 
extremely sentimental and 
emotional person that I 
am, my eyes began to pool 
behind my dark 
sunglasses, and although 
the tears never travelled 
beyond their home, I felt 
greatly touched by my 
surrounding patrons, and I 
was honestly glad that 
Chris and I had attended. 

The participants kept 
strolling by and the crowd 
continued to cheer; by the 
time my parents turned the 
corner I was really 
enjoying myself. As soon 
as I saw them my hear 



filled with pride. When 
they walked past us I 
waved and called to them. 
I wanted everyone around 
me to know that they were 
my mon and dad. 

At the time of the 
fireworks display at 
Adam's Field in Quincy, I 
was safely holed up up in 
my Hull residence. I had 
wanted to hang around for 
the rest of the fim, but my 
weary form was advising 
me otherwise. I heard a 
loud weatherish noise as I 
was getting ready for bed; 
I knew that thunder storms 
were in the forecast, but 
the sound was too 
persistent. 

I made my way up to 
our third floor to see 
whatever there was to see 
when I was reminded of 
the evening's finale. I 
discovered that if I sat in 
the third floor bay window 
I, too, was able to partake 
in the dazzling sight 
taking place above 
Quincy's dark night skies, 
even it I was about 25 
minutes away. 

Of course, the sound 
wasn't as loud as it was in 
Quincy (definitely a big 
part in fireworks viewing), 
but I had the soothing 
chorus of the ocean as it 
made its nightly rounds on 
Nantasket Beach. I gave 
thought to our country's 
stately symbol and how 
proud I am to be an 
American, and as much as 
I complain about policies 
and politics aiKl whatnot, I 
as so very glad for my 
freedom and wouldn't trade 
it for anything. 
(Katherine Ryder is a 
resident of Hull and the 
daughter of Charles and 
Cindy Ryder of Ryder's in 
Quincy) 



Hugo Fabrizio Scholarship 
Established At Quincy College 



O. Clayton Johnson, 
president of Quincy 
College, announces the 
creation of a scholarship in 
memory of the late Hugo 
P. Fabrizio, a director of 
College Courses, Inc., and 
long-time supporter of 
Quincy College. 

The first Hugo P. 
Fabrizio Scholarship was 
presented to Valerie A. 
Laurentano of Abington at 



the recent commencement 
ceremonies. She is 
enrolled in the medical 
secretarial program at 
Quincy College. 

Present at the awarding 
of the scholarship was 
Fabrizio's wife, Nancy 
Fabrizio; his son and 
daughter-in-law. Ward 4 
City Councillor and Mrs. 
Thomas Fabrizio and their 
daughter, Nicole. 



"Quincy College is 
pleased to recognize Hugo 
P. Fabrizio's long-standing 
commitment and concern 
for the college in the form 
of this memorial 
scholarship," said Johnson. 

Quincy College 
instructor Richard Hatton, 
a long-time friend of 
Fabrizio, recently donated 
$100 to the scholarship 
fiind. 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

\ 

Merrymount 

Honor Roll 

Dedicated 

Two Gold Star mothers, Mrs. Alfred Fumiss and Mrs. 
John Kelly, unveiled the honor roll as thousands of 
Merrymount residents turned out on Independence Day 
morning for the ceremonies at the comer of Sea St. and 
Narragansett Rd. • •<<<< ■ ■ 



July 1-7 

1945 

4S Years Ago 



The honored dead from 
Merrymount whose names 
appeared with a gold star on 
the honor roll included Roger 
F. Furniss, Theodore M. 
Jackson, Paul Kelly, ———————— 

Frederick Martin, Alexander McQueen, FrederickC. Muiphy 
and John A. Stanton. 

City Solicitor John P. Flavin was the principle speaker at 
the dedicatory exercises that highlighted Merrymount's 
23rd annual observance of the Fourth of July. 

Elsewhere on die Fourth in Quincy, the Davis St. Asso- 
ciates held a gala block dance the night before with about 300 
dancing to the latest recordings, Edith Nicholl and Charics 
Corey won the elimination dance. 

The Squantimi Women's Club float, with costumes de- 
signed by Mrs. Albert D. Young, won first prize in the Fourth 
of July parade in Squantum. The day started with the flag- 
raising ceremony supervised by George O. Dtxoa 

Milk and ice cream were distributed to children at the 
Montclair Improvement Association celebration, which also 
featured movies in the Montclair School and a model air- 
plane show presented by John Ghiorse and Arthur Muldoon. 

GAS STATION OPPOSED 

A petition with 123 names of nearby residents was 
presented to the License Board in opposition to plans for a 
gasoline station at 632-636 Adams St. It was presented by 
Kenneth Mclsaac, Mrs. Matthew Gindorf, Mario Ferrazzi 
and John Mitchel. 

Mrs. Gindorf told the License Board that there already 
were eight filling stations within less than a quarter of a mile 
on Adams St 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Samuel Wolf of 230 Quincy Ave., Quincy Point, com- 
plained that a deer was coming out of the woods near 
Winthrop Park every moming and eating the vegetablcii in 
his backyard garden . . . Michael J. Mahoney was installed as 
the sixth president of the Quincy Lions Qub . . . Francis X. 
Coleman of Dorchester reported to Police that his pants and 
wallet were stolen while he was swimming in Fallon's 
Quarry . . . The fried clam plate was 65 cents and the fresh 
lobster salad $ 1 .20 at Topsy 's Chicken Coop, 1 1 43 Hancock 
St., at the comer of Dimmock St . . . Mayor Ross filed 
nomination papers to run for re-election . . . The Senate Ways 
and Means Committee reported favorably on a plan to build 
a $4.5 million sewage treatment plant at Nut Island, Houghs 
Neck . . . President James C. Gardner presided at the monthly 
meeting of the City Employees Uniwi Local 802 at William 
Bradford Hall . . . MDC Commissioner William Morrissey 
recommended a $23,000 ^)prqjriation to improve Old Colony 
Boulevard and provide shore protection for Quincy Shore 
Drive . . . Butter was 47 cents and 24 red points a pound at the 
A and P stores . . . Lt. Lloyd A. Oster of 10 Standish Ave., 
WoUaston, was en route home on the Navy Transport Her- 
mitage after being freed from a German prison camp by 
Russian infantrymen . . . Mrs. Ida F. Kramer of 72 Glendale 
Rd. filed nomination papers to ran for the City Council from 
Ward 1. . . . Robert H. Rimmer of 84 Narragansett Rd, 
Merrymount, was promoted to first lieutenant at an Air 
Corps base in India . . . Mayor Ross advocated the erection 
of a new municipal hospital for chronic cases as a post-war 
project . . . "This Man's Navy," starring Wallace Beery and 
Tom Drake, and "Nothing But Trouble," with Laurel and 
Hardy, were playing at the Regent Theater in Norfolk Downs 
. . . Thomas D. Curtin, 50, prominent real estate man, died at 
his home, 52 Highfield Rd., Menymount . . . Johnny and 
Phyllis were performing at the J and J, Inc., formerly Lucien's, 
80 Copeland St. , West Quincy . . . The Squantum Swimming 
Club beach on Dorchester St was dedicated to the memory 
of Lt. Robert I. Nickerson, the first Squanmm serviceman 
killed in World War H. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 

Quincy Citizens Association Honors Louise LeGrice 




LOUISE LeGRICE is presented a Paul Revere silver bowl as the Quincy Citizens 
Association's ^HTitizen of the Year" from President Arthur Chandler and Vice President 
Dr. Donald MacLeod. 

Quincy Legion Honors Two Central Students 



The Quincy American 
Legion presented two 
awards to the outstanding 
boy aixi girl of the 1993 
graduating class at Central 
Middle School recently. 

Maureen M. Sullivan 
and Jon D. Mahoney were 
the winners and were 
presented certificates on 



plaques and medals of the 
school awards program at 
the graduation assembly 
on June 24. 

The class of 173 
graduates, were considered 
by faculty nominations on 
the attributes of courage, 
honor, leadership, 
patriotism, scholarship and 
service. 



The American Legion 
School Awards are 
presented aimually under 
the direction of Louis 
DiMartinis, principal, 
through Quincy Post 95, 
represented by Robert Leo 
Eng, past state 
commander, chairman. He 
was assisted by Post 
Member David Wood. 



QUINCY CmZENS ASSOCL\TION elected new officers during its annual luncheon at 
RafTael's. From left, Arthur Chandler, president; Dorothy Kelly, secretary; John 
Digilio, treasurer; and Dr. Donald MacLeod, vice president. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



Dr. James Will Quincy 'Lion Of The Year' 



Dr. James Will, Quincy 
dentist, was selected "Lion 
of the Year" by the Quincy 
Lion's Qub. 

The presentation of the 
award was made at the 
installation dinner by 

George Smith, treasurer. 



M.sn 



M/) 



/:\c' Pi]\suiiin Liiid Sii)\:^con 



We have 
moved, but 
our focus 
hasn't 
changed! 



Currently accepting new patients. 



Dr. Domenic Strazzulla and 
his staff are pleased lo 
announce the relocation of 
their ophthalmic offices. We're 
in the same building, on the 
same floor — our offices have 
just moved around the corner! 
Our address and phone 
number remain the same. 

This move will allow us lo 
better serve our patients with 
state-of-the-art, quality eye 
care in a more spacious and 
comfortable environment. 



Domenic M. Strazzulla, MD 
Crown Colony Office Park 
500 Congress Street 
Suite lA-1 
Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-1505 



Providing state-of-the-art 
eye care, now and into the 
future: 

■ cataract surgery 

• lens implants 

• in -office laser surgery 

• treatment for glaucoma and 
diabetic eye disease 

Dr. Strazzuila is a hoard irrtified 
ophthalmdo^si. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



ISTYLISH120.SEATEF 

DBCOVnaNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

TH0U6HTT0BE 

AMELIA'S. 

The s«erci's out 

! functton room «t Amelia's 

has become one of Boston's 

I most popular spots for wed 

dings, shouicn, corporate 

meet in gs, and get logethers 

of all kinds. We feature an 

I extensive menu at affordable 

prices We overlook Manna 

Bay and the Boston skyline 

Wed like 10 make your next 

functxxi really fly 

■I Please caD 617471 1453 



f 




FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasioris 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



BEAUTY & SKINCARE 



ELECTRIC BEACH 
Tanning Center 

11 Parkingway 

Quincy Center 

472-5256 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



INVITATIONS & FAVORS 



15% off on Invitations 

E&TCERAMICS& 
PRINTING 

516 SEA STREET -QUINCY 

(617)479-4107 

Ask about our Cislom Made Favors: iS 
Centerpieces for alt Occasions 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography ^ 

MC'" studio 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family A! - Dave - Mark * 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



and Daniel Dunn, King 
Lion of the Quincy Lions 
Qub. 

Dr. Will, a member of 
the club for 28 years, and 
a past president, was 
commended for his 
"outstanding service, 
loyalty and devotion to 
Lionism." 

Dr. Will serves at the 
annual Lions pancake 
fundraiser breakfast in 
addition to organizing the 



free glaucoma screening 
clinic and collecting used 
eye-glasses for the Lions 
Club "New Eyes For The 
Needy" Program. 

"Eye sight conservation 
by gifts to Mass Eye 
Research Foundation, 
providing eye exams and 
eye glasses to needy 
Quincy Students and 
hearing aids to the elderiy 
is all in keeping with the 
Lion's motto 'We Serve,'" 
said Dr. Will. 



Six Residents Receive 
Bunker Hill Degrees 



Six Quincy residents 
recently received 
associates degrees from 
Bunker Hill Community 
College in Boston. 

They are: 

Thank Bui, Shu-Min 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Lin, Mark Murray, all of 
Quincy, Bay Tran So Chu, 
Mary Yee, both of North 
Quincy, and Kenneth T. 
Mui of Wollaston. 

Recipients of 

certificates are Ngoc Nga 
Thi Nguyen, Lin Zhen 
Zhao, both of Quincy, Ken 
Yee Chia Yew Chia and 
Pualine A. 

McDonald, both of North 
Quincy. 




Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



tographs with engai^emeat annaunceiaieats aas it 

always has. 

The Sun will also cotiUnue to use iti weddiui: 
aunouncentents the names of all merabets of die 
wedding party includiagmaidormattoaoflioaor^, 
best man, parents, bridesmaids^ adiers, fk/mx 
girls and ringbearers, etc. ^ . ^ 

We invite engaged couples to sxUtsaiX flidip' 
photos with their auuoimcemaat&aiid when s«b» 
ittitting Ojeir weddingplwrto to inclnde a complete 
listing ot the wedding pm.y. 

Black and white photos are preferred. Tliie Sun 
can conven most color photos to black and white 
for publication but the photo loses some clarity in 
the process. 

We suggest that when you have your engage- 
ment photo taken, you request the studio to send a 
copy to The Sun with the reminder that The Sun is 
continuing its policy of publishing engagement 
photos. 

The Smi also publishes anicles and photos of 
wedding anniversaries beginning with the 25th 
anniversary. 

And, as in the past, there is no charge. 




Social 



ROSLYN GREENWALD of Merrymount congratulates 
John Williams, recently retired conductor of the Boston 
Pops, on being honored with a special presentation at the 
11th annual Elliot Norton Awards at the Boston Park 
Plaza Hotel. 

^ (Joel Abbott photo) 



Nancy Edwards Nursing Home 
Social Worker Of The Year 



Nancy Edwards, social 
services director at the 
William B. Rice Eventide 
Home in Quincy, has been 
named "Nursing Home 
Social Worker of the 
Year" by the 

Massachusetts Chapter of 
the National Association 
of Social Workers. 

Edwards, a Milton 
resident, became 

Eventide's social services 
director in 1891. She was 
nominated for the award 
by the Home's staff. 

"She is the heart of 
Eventide," said 



Administrator Priscilla 
Urann. "She is the 
consummate nursing home 
social worker." 

Edwards earned her 
bachelor's degree in 
sociology from Regis 
College. She is a 
corporator at Milton 
Hospital and a member of 
the Board of Directors of 
Milton Campership. 

The Eventide Home is a 
non-profit, charitable 
retirement and nursing 
home and has served the 
area since 1926. 



GARY SMYTH and ELIZABETH WALSH 

(Peter Silowan Photography) 

Elizabeth Walsh Engaged 
To Gary Smyth 



Mr. and Mrs. James F. 
Walsh of Wollaston 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, 
Elizabeth, to Gary A. 
Smyth. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. 
Smyth of Quincy. 

Miss Walsh, a graduate 



College. She is employed 
by Colonial Federal 
Savings Bank. 

Mr. Smyth, a graduate 
of Quincy High School, 
attended Northeastern 
University and the 
University of 

Massachusetts. He is a 



Cedrone School Committee 
Campaign Kickoff July 6 



The Committee to Elect 
Christine M. Cedrone to 
the Quincy School 
Committee will hold a 
campaign kickoff and 
fundraiser Tuesday, July 6 
from 7 to 10 p.m. at the 
Adams Heights Men's 
Club, 63 Bower Rd., 

Cindy Young 
Radcliffe Grad 

Cindy Young, 115 West 
Squantum St., Quincy, 
recently graduated from 
Radcliffe College in 
Cambridge. 



United Way 

// hnn^s out ttw best tn dll at us 



Quincy. 

Food and refreshments 
will be served. 

Tickets are $15 per 
person. For more 

information, contact the 
Cedrone Committee, 99 
South Walnut St., Quincy, 
479-2217. 

Campaign manager is 
Vinny J. Scamici; treasurer 
is Mary Cedrone. 



of Archbishop Williams firefighter for the City of 

High School and Quincy Quincy. 
College, is currently An August wedding is 

attending Stonehill planned. 

Deanne DeSantis Graduates 
From Tufts University 

Deanne M. DeSantis of Astronautics. 
Quincy recently graduated In her senior year, 
from Tufts University DeSantis was a peer 
School of Engineering. advisor and taught a 

DeSantis, who course, "Media and the 

graduated on the Dean's 1992 Election." She was 
List, received a bachelor's also given an award for 
degree in mechanical outstanding service to the 

Tufts community. 

Deanne is the daughter 
of Barbara DeSantis of 
Quincy and Frederick 



engmeenng. 

During her four years at 
Tufts, Deanne served as 
president of a sorority, 
secretary of the American DeSantis of Plymouth 
Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, and chairman 
of the American Institute 
of Aeronautics and 



Arts & Handcrafts 



Our Purrte Dinosaur 
Delivers Balloons 




690 Hancock 9tL • Quincy 
773-0690 




€ftAFT 

CLASSES 
472-7508 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 

Ann Sullivan Engaged 
To Dr. Robert Henshaw 




Mr. and Mrs. John J. 
Sullivan of Quincy 
announce the engagement 
of their daughter, Ann 
Marie, to Dr. Robert M. 
Henshaw. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Henshaw of Danville, 
Calif. 

Miss Sullivan, a 
graduate of Quincy High 
School, received a 
bachelor's degree in 
occupational therapy from 
Boston University in 1985, 
a master's degree in public 
health from UCLA in 
1991, and a master's 
degree in business 



administration from UCLA 
in 1992. She is employed 
as a health care consultant 
with Arthur Anderson & 
Company in Los Angeles, 
Calif. 

Dr. Henshaw received a 
bachelor of science degree 
in mechanical engineering 
from MIT in 1986 and 
doctor of medicine from 
Tufts University in 1990. 
He is a fourth year resident 
in orthopedic surgery at 
UCLA Medical Center in 
Los Angeles. 

A December wedding is 
planned. 



Dr. Susan Dextradeur Receives 
Doctor Of Veterinary Medicine 



Dr. Susan Charlene 
Dextradeur of Quincy 
recently graduated from 
Ohio State University 
College of Veterinary 
Medicine with a doctor of 
veterinary medicine cum 
laude. 

Dextradeur, 26, will be 
practicing medicine in 
Chillicothe, Ohio. 

She attended the 

Christina Callatian 

Christina N. Callahan, 
50 Surf Side Lane, 
Quincy, recently graduated 
from Newman Preparatory 



Quincy Pollard School and 
Quincy Point Junior High 
School. She graduated 
from Quincy High School 
in 1985 and Brandeis 
University in 1989 cum 
laude. 

Susan is the daughter of 
Miriam Noonon of Quincy 
and Gerald Dextradeur of 
North Weymouth. 

Newman Grad 

School in Boston. 

She is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Callahan. 



LOVE IS 







a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 



SpMk lo RH. -- rii.'t our r.nt.1 .V|.nl 
• p.clalliing In compl.U w.dding 
PKkag. pl.iM •nd ill olh«r ocolon. 
Th. Gold.n Lion SuH. accomodat.. up 
to 300. Th. V.iMtlan Room up to 140 
gu.tU. Gi«. Rll. . c.ll toe an 
appotntnMnI tor your r..w«atlon Nm> 
brochur.t ar* avallaMa 

(Air CondNlorMd) 

CALL 

Quincy Sons of Italy Social Cf nirr 

120 Quarry SirctI, Quincv. MA 02169 

NEW N( MBER is 472-f90« 




Q^K^iii^S^lB^'''^^'^■ Frames 

■ BeautiM Lamps V^V'KjlLfpO'^^ BCiystal 

■ Decorative Mirrors ^^^^*J[*^^^^^ ■ Collectibles 

■ Wilton Armetale aPottoy 

Think of Us for Showers and Weddings! 

OPEN YEAR ROUND 

Open Tues.-Sat. 10-5, Sun. 12-5, Closed Mondays 

(fSfl 853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 ^^ 



12 Old Colony Ave.,Wollaston 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



..JRussell Edward's ' 

A full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 

TUES & THURS . 
Men's Special $13.00 1 

WEDNESDAY 1 





Perm Special 

Starting at $42.00 

^ Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 

All specials Include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 

REDKEN KMS HC^MS pfkjln/.tcihell ymatflx 

472-1060 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1W3 



Arts/Entertainment 



Mid-Week Concert Series 
At Bethany Begins July 7 



The Friends of Bethany, 
in collaboration with 
Scarborough Productions, 
are sponsoring the new 
Bethany Mid-Week 
Concert Series 

Wednesdays from 12:15 to 
12:45 p.m. during July and 
August at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Quincy Center. 

The series was 
organized by Joanne 
French, coordinator of the 
Friends of Bethany, and 
Virginia Sindelar of 
Scarborough Productions. 

Soprano Andrea 
Bradford will open the 
series July 7 singing 
spirituals and 19 century 
songs. Bradford sang with 
"Opera Un Met" at 
Quincy 's First Night and in 
the Multi-Cultural Concert 
Series at the church in 
February celebrating 
Black History Month. 

Visitors are encouraged 
to take tours of the historic 
Bethany Library and 
Chapel from 10 a.m. to 2 
p.m. and to have a light 
lunch of sandwiches, 

r- — CLIP & SAVE §€• 




ANDREA BRADFORD 



finger desserts and punch 
in the Allen Parlor 
following the concert. A 
free will offering of $2.50 
will be taken for the 
concert and lunch. 



Summerfest V3 

Free Summer Concerts 
Our 1 1th Year 

All performances will be held at 
the Ruth Gordon Ampitheatre at 
Merrymount Park on Wednesday 
evenings, 7 PM - 9 PM 

July 7 Quincy Choral Society 

Broadway tunes and 
popular music 

July 14 Majlc 

Top forty, standard 
oldies 

July 21 Continentals 

Big Band Sound 

July 28 Obsession 

Top forties, musical 
variety 

Aug, 4 Reminisants 

Fifties-sixties 
musical variety 

Aug. 11 Crossroads 

Easy listening 
light rock 

Aug. 18 Navy Show Band 
Newport, R.I. 

Aug. 25 Yankee Jack 

Country-Western 

Sept 1 Army Show Band 

Fort Devens, MA 

Joseph J. LaRaia 
President 



Sponsored by the 
Quincy South Shore 
Cultural Commission Inc. 




Summerfest Opens July 7 
With Quincy Choral Society 



Summerfest '93 will 
open its season of free 
concerts Wednesday, July 
7 with the Quincy Choral 
Society featuring 
Broadway tunes and other 
popular music. 

The series, held each 
Wednesday from 7 to 9 
p.m. at the Ruth Gordon 
Amphitheatre, will 
continue through Sept. 1. 



Other performers will 
include flutist Virginia 
Sindelar and guitarist Berit 
Strong July 14, clarinetist 
Edmund Aluisy and pianist 
EUzabeth Hodges July 21, 
organist Greg Flynn July 
28, ceUist Andy Mark Aug. 
4, organist Peter Krasinski 
Aug. 11, composer- tenor- 
guitarist Jim Carr Aug. 18, 
and Asian music 
(performer to be 
announced) Aug. 25. 

Sav« Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



The concerts are 
sponsored by the Quincy- 
South Shore Cultural 
Commission of which City 
Councillor Joseph LaRaia 
is president. 

The rest of the summer 
schedule: 

July 14: Majic, top 40, 
standard oldies. 

July 21: Continentals, 
Big Band Sound. 



July 28: Obsession, top 
40, musical variety. 

Aug. 4: Reminisants, 
50's, 60's musical variety. 

Aug. 11: Crossroads, 
easy listening light rock. 

Aug. 18: Navy Show 
Band, Newport, R.I. 

Aug. 25: Yankee Jack, 
country-western. 

Sept. 1: Army Show 
Band, Fort Devens. 



Storytelling Series Begins 
July 13 At Crane Library 



Summer storytelling 
sessions at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, 
Washington St., Quincy 
Square, will begin 
Tuesday, July 13. 

Performers will echo 
the statewide theme, "Set 
Sail On a Sea of Books." 
All performances of the 
six-week series, which is 
being funded by the 
Quincy Arts Council, will 



be Tuesdays at 7 p.m. in 
the children's department 
at the library. 

Performers will include 
Jim Douglas with "Sailor's 
Joy" July 13, Diane 
Edgecomb with 

"SeaWaves and 

Storyshells" July 20, 
Alicia Quintano with 
various sea legends July 
27, Derek Burrows with 
Bahamian stories and 



songs Aug. 3; Carole 
Duhamel with Down East 
humor Aug. 10, and the 
Poobley Greegy Puppet 
Theater with "Going, 
Going, Gone Whaling" 
Aug. 17. 

Children age five and 
older as well as adults will 
enjoy these programs. 
Schedules are available at 
the main Ubrary and the 
three branch libraries. 



Youth Garden Workshop 
To Begin On July 6 



Recreation Director The camp is open to 

Barry Welch announces ^oys and girls at least 

the Quincy Recreation seven years of age. 
Department is acceptin 



registration for the Youth 
Garden Workshop to be 
held Tuesdays beginning 

July 6 to August 17, from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m., at Lincoln 
Hancock Community 
School. 



Cost 
is $15. 

The camp is under the 
direction of Stephen 
Cantelli, a teacher at the 
school. Garderers will 
nurture plants from seeds 
to harvest and will 



will be grown in our 
Quincy Youth Garden. 

Interested persons can 
register for the camp at the 
Recreation Office, 100 
Southern Artery, between 
9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
Registration is taken on a 
first come first serve basis. 
For fXurther information 



participate in a variety of call 376-1386 (376-1- 
vegetables and flowers FUN)- 



CP Production Held At Lincoln-Hancock 



More than 120 people 
attended Cerebral Palsy of 

the South Shore's recent 
production of "The New 
Paradise Earth," a musical 
revue, at the Lincoln- 
Hancock School. 

The production was 
directed by Gail 
Gundersen-Tilley of 
Quincy. Performers 
included Peter Bamber, 
Allyson Borden, Ruth 
Clark, Mary DuDutis, 
Sheila Farren, Kristen 
Fichtner, James Flaherty, 
Linda Gallagher, Lyn 
Geary, Darrell Gleek, Dan 
Harkin, Carol Mirra, Laura 
Neal, Lynn Norton, Alice 
O'Keefe, Dianne Polk, 
Gloria Spinosa, Georgia 



StanatopouHs, and Maura 
Sullivan. 

The performers were all 
members of an evening 
class that meets 
Wednesdays and is co- 
sponsored by the Quincy 
Recreation Department. In 
addition to drama, the 



program offers ceramics, 
arts and crafts, painting, 
sewing and a series of 
special events. 

For more information on 
the program call Cerebral 
Palsy of the South Shore 
at 479-7443. 



Neighbors Night 
At Beechwood Center 



! 



CLIP & SAVE K 



TWIST'S 

HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 



"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

S«A BMInat M. 
N. Oukicy, MA 

472-8558 . 



Beechwood Community 
Life Center will hold a 
"Neighbors Night" tonight 
(Thursday) at 7 p.m. at the 
center, 225 Fenno St., 
Wollaston. 

Families living in the 
Beechwood Knoll 
neighborhood are 
especially invited to get 
acquainted with neighbors, 
learn about the center' 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773^600 



iMl 



WED & THURS JUNE 30 & JULY 1 

Charlie Sheen - Lloyd Bridges 

"HOT SHOTSI PART DEUX" 

(PG-13) 

EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 2 

Michael J. Fox 
"LIFE WITH MIKEY" (PG) 

A Family Comedy 

FRI & SAT 7:00 8.9:15 

SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



MON & TUES DOLLAR NIGHT 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



summer programming and 
plan upcoming events. 

Beechwood's staff and 
volunteers will provide 
updates about Summer 
Camp "Elder Park," and 
the "Community Garden" 
and Summer Be-fit 
offerings. Suggestions for 
future neighborhood events 
will be welcomed. 

Ward 5 Councillor 
Charles Phelan and 
conservationist Clara 
Yeoman will share 
information and ideas 
about the "Marsh Mapping 
Project." 

A bi-lingual staff person 
will assist Chinese 
neighbors for EngUsh is a 
second language. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra mortey by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 
Telephone: 471-3100 



Michael Cheney Candidate 
For Re-election To City Council 



Thursday, July I, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 

Dr. Stephen Tarpy Joins 
Medical Staff At Quincy Hospital 



Councillor-at-Large 
Michael Cheney 

announces he will be a 
candidate for re-election to 
the Quincy City Council. 
Cheney has served five 
years as Ward 1 
Councillor and four years 
as councillor-at-Large. 

Cheney has chaired the 
Environmental Control 
Committee where he 
fought to rezone several 
hundred parcels of land to 
open space and has 
established a number of 
ordinances to preserve 
open space. He has also 
served as Chairman of the 
Public Saftey Committee 
and advocated that a 
police study be conducted 
that resulted in a "Policy 
and Procedures Manual" 
established for the Quincy 
Police Department. As 

former chairman of the 
Ordinance Committtee, 
Cheney advocated a 
recodification of city 
ordinances. This process 
is being put in place at 
present and will facilitate 
researching and accessing 
local laws, he noted. 
Currently Cheney 




MICHAEL CHENEY 

expressed his desire to 
attract business to the City 
of Quincy to create jobs 
for the residents of Quincy. 
He said he is also 
committed to protect and 
preserve the quality of life 
in our neighborhoods. At a 
recent gathering of 
supporters, Cheney 
reiterated he will continue 
to be accessible and 
responsive to the residents 
of Quincy. 

"The uniqueness of 
each neighborhood in 
Quincy is what makes 
serves as chairman of the Quincy a great City to live 
Tourism Committee in and to raise your famUy 
through which he has in," he said. "I pledge to 
established Quincy's First the residents of Quincy 
Night Celebration which that I will continue to work 
is a non-alcoholic, family to preserve the character 
celebration of New Year's of Quincy and improve on 
Eve. He also serves as the quality of life for all." 
Chairman of the event. Cheney noted he has 

In announcing his also been active in the 
candidacy, Cheney fight to lower MWRA 

4 Residents On Dean's List 
At UMass Lowell 



sewer-water bills. He said 
many other communities 
have tacked on additional 
charges above and beyond 
the MWRA costs of 
delivering services. 
Cheney said Quincy has 
not done so. 
"It is important to make 
sure that residents receive 
evey dollar's worth of 
services for every dollar 
paid whether it be MWRA 
bills of their tax dollars," 
he said. 

A Cheney ordinance 
created the Human 
Relations Commission, 
which recenty passed in 
the City Council and 
establsibes appointments 
by the mayor to serve on 
the commission. 

"The City of Quincy is 
a diverse city and the 
establishment of a Human 
Relations Commission will 
be a positive force that 
will help foster a better 
understanding across 
cultural lines," he said. 

Cheney said he is proud 
of the reputation he has 
gained as a hard worker for 
the people of Quincy. He 
is a home owner and lives 
at 94 Rock Island Rd., 
Houghs Neck with his 
wife, Patricia Lydon 
Cheney and their three 
children, Michael, age 17, 
Kristy, age 15 and Shawn, 
age 12. 

Anyone interested in 
helping his campaign may 
contact him at 471-1493. 



Dr. Stephen P. Tarpy, 
M.D., a pulmonologist with 
Dr. James O'Brien, M.D., 
will join in practice 
starting July 1. 

He will become a 
member of the medical 
staff of Quincy Hospital. 
A pulmonologist is a 
physician who studies and 



treats problems and 
disea.ses to the lungs. 

The practice which is 
known as Respiratory 
Medical Associates, 
specializes in Pulmonary 
Medicine including sleep 
disorders. 

Tarpy comes to his new 
position after completing a 
Pulmonary Fellowship at 



Four Quincy residents 
were recently named to 
the Dean's List at the 
University of 

Massachusetts in Lowell. 

They are: 

Derek J. Borek, 69 



Grand View Ave.; Bethany 
Howe, 90 Hall Place; 
Bruce D. Marshall, 40 

Ames St.; and Renee M. 
Robichaud, 56 Freeman 
St. 




OF MASSACHUSETTS BJ^ 



I Always Buying 
j New&Qld 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Con][dete Line (tf Supfdies 






FLY TO 
CAPE COD 
BY BOAT! 

Back by popular demand - 
our 2-1/2 hour cruise 
to Provincetown! 

Fly by the highways and bridges. 

This is the fastest, most tun way 

to the tip of Cape Cod! 

Spend 4 hours exploring the sights, 

shops, and streetside eateries. You can 

even explore the sand dunes, or climb the 

Pilgrim Monument and see back to Boston! 

After your fun-filled day, relax with a 
cocktail on your cruise back as we watch 
the sun set over the Boston skyline. 
Sailing from Bay Pointe Marina in Quincy, 
•very Wednasday & Thursday. June 23- 
Sapt. 2. Departs at 9, returns at 6:30. Kids 
age 8 and under go free. 



617«770»1008 



Quincy to 

Provincetown 
BOAT EXPRESS 



Most trips sell out — 
reservations are necessary 



Veterans Health Clinic 
At Bryan Post July 6 



military discharge from 
active service. For more 
information, call Patricia 
Healy or Robert La Reur 
at Quincy Veterans 
Services, 376-1192. 



Boston University Medical 
Center. Prior to that he 
was an Instructor in 
Medicine at the Boston 
University and Tufts 
University School of 
Medicine. 

Tarpy graduated from 
Boston University School 
of Medicine in 1 986. He 
then completed a three 
year residency in internal 
medicine at the Boston 
VA Medical Center. He 
served a fourth year as 
Chief Resident. He will 
also be on the medical 
staff at Milton Hospital. 

He lives in Milton with 
his wife, Cheryl, and their 
daughter. 



Quincy Veterans 
Services Department will 
hold a Veterans Health 
Clinic Tuesday, July 6 
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 
the George F. Bryan VFW 
Post, 24 Broad St. 

Cholesterol, blood 
pressure, facial and 
glucomia screenings, 
cancer information, dental 

check, pharmacy and other I ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION 
services will be offered. I ^ 

OF HIS LAW OFFICE TO 



Those attending should 
bring a membership card 
for a veterans' 
organization or their 

Janet White 
Suffolk Grad 









JAMES A. SHANNON 



Janet 
Water 
recently 
Suffolk 
Boston. 



P. White, 38 

St., Quincy, 

graduated from 

University in 



PRESIDENTS PLACE 

1250 HANCOCK STREET, 

SUITE 802N 

QUINCY, MA 02169 

TELEPHONE: (617) 472-4547 
FACSIMILE: (617) 479-0006 



IfT.T.T.TTTTT.Tl ITTTTTTTTl lT^TT99r99^j j 

ft wn-r . _ 



COME JOIN OUR 

SUMMER PROGRAMS 

AT YOUNG WORLD 

TOTS JO TEENS START IN JULY 

D4NCE 
OR 6YMNASTICS 

AGES 3-12 
6 week program 

REDUCED 
SUMMER RATES 




» 



SUiNMER FUN 
BOYS AGIRIS AGES 3-6 

1-2 or 3 mornings per weel< 

DANCE • GYMNASTICS 

GAMES • SONGS 

FUN • FUN • FUN 



CALL NOW TO REGISTER FOR A FUN FILLED SUMMER 471-3808 
221 PARKINGWAY - QUINCY 



•■ 



Located 3/4 mile north of the fore River Bridge off Rt 3A. 
Bay Pointe Marina. Washington Court, Quincy 




MORNING PRE-SCHOOL 

Register Now Ages 3-5 for Sept. 

Superb Staff • License #17 

VISITORS ARE WELCOME 

TTTTTITITTTIT.TITTTTTIITTTTTTTI 







** 
• * 



K 



UR STAR PAPER 
SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

Plastic Table Covers (Banquet size) 
Red, White or Blue $1.50 each 

9" Paper Plates (lOO ct.) 990 pkg. 
7 oz. Plastic Cups (ioo ct.) $1.09 pkg. 
Dinner Napkins (2 piy, ioo ct.) 990 pkg. 



EVERYTHING YOU'LL NEED FOR A PARTY 
AT THE LOW. LOW PRICES 






144 Penn Street 

(Across from Quincy Adams T Station) 

773-7773 

Monciay thru Saturday 8:30 am-5 pm 



Page 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



Council Hears Proposal For 
College Governance Change 



By BILL DONCASTER 

Quincy City Council 
heard a proposal Monday 
night for a new system of 
governance for Quincy 
College. 

School Committee 
member Linda Stice, who 
is chairman of the Quincy 
College Governance 
Committee, said the 
current proposal consists of 
a 13 member board, a 
separation of the College 
from the school 
committee, and that the 
School Superintendent 
should not be part of it. 

"When it was first 
founded," Stice said, 
"Quincy College was just 
sort of a grades 13 and 14 



in the School system. 
Quincy hasn't changed 
much, but the college 
has." 

Stice said that Quincy 
residents now make up a 
minority in the student 
body, the College is no 
longer supported by tax 
dollars, it is entirely 
tuition and grant financed. 

Councillor Tim Cahill 
said he was anxious to get 
the issue of college 
governance finished. 

"I'd like to see this 
done by September," 
Cahill said. "The school 
committee has enough to 
worry about with K through 
12." 

According to Cahill, 



POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



The Cedrone Committee 

to 

Elect 

CHRISTINE M. CEDRONE 

Candidate 

Quincy School Committee 

Invites you to a 

Kickoff/Fundraiser 

for 

CHRISTINE M. CEDRONE 

Tuesday, July 6, 1993 

Adams Heights Men's Club 

63 Bower Road, Quincy 

7 to 10 P.M. 

$15.00 per person 

Please join us for an evening of 

fun, good food and drinks. 

Paid for by The Cedrone Committee. 99 South 

Walnut Street. Quincy. 479-2217. 

Campaign Manager: Vinny J. Scamici 

Treasurer: Mary Cedrone 



NOW! 

A Complete Laser Video Disc 
Library At Your Fingertips 
If you have a laser disc player 
you can now easily select any 

disc in print by joining our club. 

Members receive our current 385- 
page catalogue listing over 7,000 titles 
which are dis- 
counted 10 per 
cent. 

Order now and 
receive a free copy 
of Laser View 
Magazine (a $2.50 
value) with your 
first laser disc or- 
der 

Send only $6.25 (includes tax) 

plus $1.95 for shipping to: 

Laser Sights, P.O. Box 3392, 

Boston, Ma. 02101. 

(Allow 2 to 4 weeks for delivery) 




Mayor James Sheets has 
made it clear he will not 
sign any plan until it has 
been approved by the 
school committee. 

Stice said the school 
committee is not planning 
to debate the plan until 
their July 2 1 meeting. 

The plan requires City 
Council approval before it 
is submitted to the state 
Legislature in the form of 
a home rule petition. 

All Councillors that 
spoke on the subject 
Monday night commended 
the committee for the work 
put in, but said it was a 
lengthy document that 
could not be dealt with all 
at once. 





V. ^"if~/- 



:&r. 



«*■ < 



'••' .jf 




SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL Nurse Geraldine Le^s of Quincy, right, recently brought 
her daughters, Christine, 11, and Jennifer, 16, to work as part of "Take Our Daughters 
to Work Day," sponsored by the Ms. Foundation for Women. The Lewis' daughters 
help their mom strip a bed for a patient. They also helped assemble charts and 
provided refreshments to patients recovering fk-om surgery. The program familiarized 
young women with what adults do at the workplace. 



Traffic, Jobs Issues At Store Hearing 



Confd From Page 1 

being against the project, 

The project falls in 
Ward 4, Councillor 
Thomas Fabrizio's ward, 
who said, "I don't know if 
the plan presented can 
satisfy demands of 
residents." 

He said he had 
reservations about the 
traffic pattern Home 
Quarters showed at the 
meeting, including the 250 
foot driveway emptying 
onto Willard St. 

Southworth said traffic 
was as much a concern for 
Home Quarters as it is for 
residents of the area, and 
that the project will 
include new traffic lights 
for the street and other 
safeguards. 

Fabrizio said that the 
state measures roads with 
a "level of service rating" 
on a scale from A to F, F 
being the lowest, and that 
Willard St. already has an 
E rating. 

"I don't see yet how this 
can work as they're 
proposing it now," he said. 

Fabrizio also noted the 
same concerns about 
South Shore Plaza's 



possible second floor and 
^the cinema. 

Fabrizio played a major 
role in ironing out an 
agreement betwen 
developers of Home Depot 
and concerned residents in 
1991 and said he is 
reserving judgement on 
this project until he sees 
en^eer plans. 

"We have to look at 
technical aspects of 
planning this project," he 
said. 

Fabrizio's opponent for 
City Council, Mike 
D'Amico, who lives on 
Willard St., spoke out 
against the proposal. 

"This has to stop," 



D'Amico said, "What's in 
this for me and my fellow 
residents? Trucks, worries 
and traffic. There is no 
benefit to the residents in 
this area." 

Mention was made by 
representatives of Home 
Quarters that they would 
make a payment to the 
city in lieu of taxes, and 
perhaps donate unused 
land from the project to 
the city. 

"There has been no talk 
of what that payment 
would be," said Fabrizio 
"but if they own land then 
they pay taxes." 

He also said that 



accepting such a land 
donation may be counter 
productive, as it may be 
more worthwhile to collect 
the property taxes from it. 

Also of concern, is that 
this project will require far 
more blating then Home 
Depot did. 

"There will be 
tremendous amount 
blasting," Fabrizio said 

He added that he 
thought the present parking 
plan was insufficient, and 
if Home Quarters went into 
additional parking, they 
would have to blast 
through 90 feet of rock to 
level the area. 



a 
of 



John McMann Named Staff Director For AAA 



Quincy native John G. 
McMann has been 
appointed staff director of 
Public and Government 
Relations at AAA 
Massachusetts/New Hamp- 
shire, announces General 
Manager Liam S. White. 

In his new position, 
McMann will direct 
Division activities related 
to public relations. 



legislation, safety, 
member relations and AAA 
World magazine and will 
be a liaison with public 
and private organizations, 
promoting the interests of 
AAA members. 

Formerly, McMann was 
vice president of Finance 
and then the general 
partner and president of 
Automobile Legal 



Association (ALA). 

Since 1991, McMann 
has resumed teaching at 
Quincy College. 

Additionally, he has 
performed management 
and financial consulting 
services for small 
developing Massachusetts 
businesses. 

He is a graduate of 
Bentley College. 




MANVS 

645 HANCOCK ST. PHONE 328-6879 
WOLLASTON, MA 021 70 



Insect and Disease Control Made Easy 

Item 

Mosquito Beater - Area mosquito preventative works 
on black flies and house flies outdoors. 
SIug-Geta - Kills snails and slugs in ornamental gar- 
dens 

Bonide - Carpenter ant control... also controls other 
wood-infesting insects. 

Ortho Systemic Rose and Flower Care - Insecticide 
and fertilizer. 6 week systemic action 
Benomyl - Systemic control of dollar spot and brown 
patches on lawns. 

Malathion 50 Pius - Insect spray. ExceUent control on 
ornamental and ftuits and vegetables 
Liquid Sevin - Controls many kinds of beetles, bugs 
and caterpillars. 

Isotox - Controls aphids, mealybugs, white flies, scales 
and other pests on ornamentals, shrubs and trees. 
Captain 50% and Up - Good all purpose fungicide 
for many ornamentals and vegetables. 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



SPONSOR 



Early control of msects and diseases wiU 
save hours of work and a^;ravation: 



Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door with personal- 
ized, measurable adverti- 
sing to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usually by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood. We tell them all 
about your business. 
Interested'' Call for more 
details: 

Barbara Nawrot Mendflz 
479-2587 



"l^fOJ^^^O 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Sun 

Classified 
Ads 



Results 



Sean Barry Candidate 
For School Committee 



Thnraday, July 1, 1993 Qnlacy San Page 11 



Sean L. Barry, of 184 
Marlboro St., Wollaston, 
has anDOUDced his 
candidacy for the Quincy 
School Committee. 

Barry told more than 
^00 at a campaign Idckoff 
party at Coddington's, 
Quincy Sq., that be has 
been working at keeping 
involved in education 
issues since his first bid for 
the committee 
ago. 




SEAN BARRY 
is convenient for 
two years politicians looking for an 
easy target, many people 



In the 1991 September forget that their improved 

Primary, Barry finished quality of life and current 

seventh in a field of 11, conditions were due to the 

just 23 votes short of being efforts of organized labor, 

nominated. I haven't forgotten that, 

"Coming that close and generations of my 

after working so hard was family wouldn't let me 



a real learning 
experience," Barry said. 
"We're in this race to win, 
and I will woik as hard as I 
can and as long as it takes 
to win this election." 

Bany, 28, is manager of 
public affairs at Quincy 
College where he also 
works as an adjunct 
professor. 

"My teaching ex- 
perience precedes Quincy 
College, though 1 have 
found the students at 
Quincy are motivated, 
bright and challenging," 
Barry said. "These 

students are certain of 
what they want from hfe, 
and they know adversity 
first hand. The personal 
success stories of so many 
Quincy College students 
are inspiring." 

Barry has taught 
developmental education 
and state and local 
government. 

Barry is also affiliated 
with the Edward T. 
Sullivan Labor 

Management Center at 
Quincy College. The 
Sullivan Center is 
sponsored by Local 254 of 
the Service Employees 
International Union, the 
largest local union in the 
state. 

"Unions have become 
the whipping boy of 
aspiring politicians for the 
past decade," he said. 
"While such a simplistic 
indictment of labor unions 



forget that either." 

Barry earned a B.A. 
degree from Ohio 
Wesleyan Univeristy, 
where he double majored 
in journalism and politics 
and government. He holds 
a master's degree in 
journalism and public 
affairs from the American 
University. Barry was a 
graduate fellow at 
American; teaching 
classes in writing and 
repotting. He received the 
James Mclntyre Graduate 
Scholarship in 1990. 

Barry is continuing his 
education as a night 
student in the American 
Studies Master's Program 
at the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston. 
He plans to enter a part- 
time doctoral program next 
year. 

A lifelong Quincy 
resident, he is the son of 
Jeanne F. (Liuzzi) Barry 
and the late Paul J. Barry. 

Barry is a member of 
the Ward 5 Democratic 
Committee and has served 
as a delegate to several 
state conventions. 

Each semester, Barry 
involves his classes in a 
community service project 
such as a canned food 
drive or volunteer effort. 

In January of 1992 
Barry lost his right leg to 
complications from cancer. 
He currently uses crutches 
and a prosthetic while 
campaigning. 



Chiropractic 
Update 

by 
Mark C. Jaehnig D.C. 



WHAT IS A "SLIPPED DISC"? 

The term "slipped disc" has been used cooimoniy by 
doctors and patients alike, to generally describe an injury to 
one of the 23 'jelly-like" shock absorbers found between each 
of the bones or vertebrae of the spine. These intervertebral 
discs are ligaments which actually consist of a 'jelly-like" 
middle surrounded by rings of fibrocartilage. Whiiethesediscs 
do not actually 'slip" from between the spinal bones, they can 
be worn, compressed, bulged or ruptured, causing pressure 
on the adjacent spinal nerves. It is the bulged or ruptured disc 
that pressures or "pinches" the nerve which actually causes 
the severe back and/or leg pain that may result. Often times, 
muscle spasms will accompany a disc injury as the body 
attempts to stabilize or splint the damaged k)wer back or neck. 

While the intervertibral discs may loose some of their 
height and resiliency and dry out slightly over the years, the 
final straw of a disc injury may be a sudden twist or slip, an 
improper lift, or a seemingly minor accident. 

Chiropractors are well qualified in the prevention and/or 
treatment of disc injuries and often employ the modern tech- 
notogy of M.R.I, or Catscan to ensure accurate diagnosis. 
Chiropractors use a drugless, non-surgical approach which 
may include manipulation, forms of therapy, proper exercise 
and bed rest. 

If you have any questions or wouH like to make an 
appointment, please call Dr. Mark Jaehnig, a lifelong Quincy 
resident at Quincy Chiropractic Office, 110 Billings Road.N. 
Quincy — 773-4400. 



"Nobody will work as 
hard as me in this 
campaign," Barry said. "It 
takes me longer to get to 
every neighborhood, but 
I'm trying and there are 
plenty of good people 
helping me out." 

Shortly after leaving the 
hospital last year Barry 
was addressing the School 
Committee on issues such 
as overcrowding and in 
favor of tightening 
attendance policies. 

"I didn't do that because 
it was the right thing to do 
politically, I did it because 
I wanted to be there. I 
want to be involved in 
decisions regarding the 
Quincy Schools." 

"Quincy Schools are 
doing a good job in 
educating Quincy's 
children. There are so 
many positive things 
which need to be 
recognized. There are 
always issues which 
require attention, and 
those issues demand a 
school committee that is 
compassionate, caring and 
committed to values and 
to fiscal responsibilty. We 
cannot overextend 
ourselves in this economy, 
as a school committee 
member I'll commit all of 
my energy to finding the 
good elements and 
preserving them, 

recognizing the bad 
elements and correcting 
them, and taking on the 
challenges facing our 
community schools, 
preparing our system for 
long term success, not 
short term emotions." 

Among the issues Barry 
said he plans to address 
are changes in the 
governance of Quincy 
College; renovation and 
preservation of existing 
school buildings; matters 
of public saftey; and 
preserving or restoring 
extracurricular programs. 

"I won't forget that the 
taxpayers of Quincy, most 
of whom have no children 
in the system, support our 
schools and deserve our 
consideration," he said. 



MWRA Asks Judge To Consider 
Scale-Back Of Harbor Project 



The Board of Directors 
of the Massachusetts 
Water Resources Authority 
(MWRA) has asked 
federal Judge A. David 
Mazzone to begin the 
process of scaling back 
costs for certain future 
work on the Boston Harbor 
Project. 

Responding not only to 
ratepayer concerns but to 
new technical data, the 
MWRA will propose how 
the Court can consider 
more cost-effective ways 
of achieving compliance 
with federal law. 

In a special report to 
Judge Mazzone, who 
oversees the harbor 
project, the authority is 
asking that he "endorse 
and estabUsh a frameworic 
for aggressive and 
sustained review of the 
Court ordered capital 
facilities to insure that 
expenditures of public 
funds be kept to the 
minimum necessary to 
comply with the mandates 
of the Clean Water Act." 

MWRA Executive 
Director Douglas B. 
MacDonald noted "the 
MWRA Advisory Board, 
the MWRA Legislative 
Caucus, the House Post 
Audit Committee, the 
Governor, the mayors in 
our district and others have 
helped guide the way 
toward substantial savings 
in the overall program. 
Now its time for the 
MWRA, on behalf of our 
ratepayers, to step up to 
the plate. We can make 
this happen." 

The framework 

proposed by the MWRA 
includes: examining new 
date with an eye toward 
reducing the scope of 
planned facilities; 
developing regulatory 
standards to support 
creative, cost-effective 
compliance strategies; and 
developing a schedule to 



^ 



BURN MORE FAT 

THAN RUNNING 

15 MILES!!! 



IN 30 DAYS YOU CAN LOSE 
UP TO 30 LBS. FOR $30. 

Personal counselling available 
at no additional charge 

It's fast, safe, and effective. It's so simple, and here's how it 

works! YOU TAKE 2 GREEN TABLETS AND 

1 BEIGE TABLET 2X'S A DAY ONCE AT 10AM 

AND ONCE AT 3:00 PM - THATS IT! 

Helps to lose weight at a higher rate. 
Helps to eliminate body fat. 

It's Uke nothing else available today. It also gives you 
tons of energy ! If you're not completely satisfied within 
10 days, we will refund your money back with no 
obUgation. 

A PORTION OF THE REVHWE FROM THE SALE OF 

EACH BOTTLE IS DEDICATED TO IMPROVING THE 

ENVIRONMENT & SAVING THE RAIN FORESTS 

Mail Orders Accepted 

NORMAN I. NISENBAUM, B.S. 

Registered Pharmacist 

215 Samoset Ave. -Quincy, MA 02169 

CALL (617) 471-1963 



reassess the scope of the 
project while maintaining 
the existing compliance 
schedule. The Authority 
would work with other 
parties to the lawsuit to 
work on the details of the 
plan. 

According to the court 
filing "the Authority has 
strong reason to believe... 
that the scope of the 
Boston Harbor capital 
program can be reduced 
significantly without 
compromising 
compliance." Savings 
could be achieved in the 
following areas: 

•Secondary Treatment: 
a potential savings of $90- 
130 million by eliminating 
one portion of the plant 
and possible reduction of 
another portion. 

•Combined Sewer 
Overflows: A possible 
savings of $700 million by 
substantially reducing the 
size of a proposed deep 
tunnel storage system. 

•Related Facilities: A 
possible savings in excess 
of $20-35 million scaling 
back sludge handling 
equipment and other 
facihties. 

•Unestimated savings 
through reduced operating 
and maintenance costs, 
consideration of 

alternative treatment 
technologies, reduction of 
extraneous flows to the 
plant and expanded 



pollution prevention 
strategies. i 

"This is a banner day 
for ratepayer," MacDonald 
said. "The Senate budget 

provides hope for 
immediate and significant 
rate relief, and the 
MWRA's strategy calls for 
a serious reexamination of 
our long-term capital 
investments." Senate 
Ways and Means 
Committee Chairman 
Thomas Birmingham 
announced June 17 the 
Senate version of the state 
budget which would 
provide up to $27 miUion 
in debt assistance to 
MWRA ratepayer and 
allows for homeowners to 
deduct a portion of their 
sewer fees from federal 
taxes. 

MacDonald noted that 
the June 17 announcement 
in no way affects cuirent 
construction under way on 
Deer Island. 

Approximately 2,500 
woikers are now travehng 
to the construction site 
daily. About 43 percent of 
the work is complete on 
the first phase of the 
primary treatment plant 
and other facilities, 
scheduled to open in July 
1994. Work is also 
proceeding on the 9.5 mile 
outfall tunnel, the 
secondary treatment plant, 
sludge digesters and other 
related faciUties. 




American Heart 
Association 



There's really only one 

reason why you'd 

go to a mall... 



To .shop 

Tcdeschi Fodd Shop 
Buck'A-Book 

To eat 

G.J. GoJJington's Restaurant 
Cafe Lazzarino 



To primp 

Presidential Dry Cleaners 
Riihert Lyons Hair Salon 



To learn & he entertained 

National Park Service 
Visitor Center 



To bank 

The Boston Five Cents 
Savings Bank ik ATM 



To see 

Flarvard Community Health 
Plan Optical Shop 

Or maybe you*d go 
for it alll 



Pr(\si(l(Mil.s l*l«u (' 

l2S01I.Hu.'.k :-i. • Oi'ii'^^ 



,■^^.^l^•• troni tiu- 
(.^lijiruv Ct-nter MBT.A St.iti.in 

N'.iliJ.itcJ p.irkinu with rtircli.i~c 
Free p.iriiint! <.\ir\ woikiiivl 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



Obituaries 



Adam J. Lucason, 87 

Owned Hollow Restaurant 



A funeral Mass for 
Adam J. Lucason, 87, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday in St. Agatha's 
Church, Milton. 

Mr. Lucason died June 
26 at Quincy Hospital after 
a long illness. 

He was owner of the 
Hollow Restaurant on 
Adams St. since it was 
established in 1936. 

He was a member of 
the Elks and the Knights of 
Columbus. 

Husband of the late 
Grace (Doherty) Lucason, 
he is survived by two 
daughters. Donna Lucason 



Cloney of Westwood and 
Grace M. Kramer of 
Norwell; two brothers, 
James Lucason of 
Brandford, Conn., and John 
Lucason of Framingham; 
nine grandchildren, and 
two great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to The Divine Word 
Missionary, 1 84 Beacon 
St., Boston, MA 02116. 



Charles E. Cahill, 65 

Retired Quincy Banker 



Walter S. Swanson, 82 

Retired Painter; Active In Clubs 



Pauline M. Maki, 94 



A private funeral 
service for Pauline M. 
(Lane) Maki, 94, of 
Quincy, was held. 

Mrs. Maki died June 26 
at the Franvale Nursing 
Home in Braintree. 

A member of the West 
Quincy Senior Citizens 
and The Salvation Army, 



United Way 

^^^ tl brings out the 6e§/ ina^ofui. 



her hobbies included 
baking and dancing. 

Born and educated in 
Finland, she lived in 
Quincy for many years. 

She was the wife of the 
late John Maki. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Salvation Army, 6 
Baxter St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 



A reader s«nt me the following poem 
by an Unknown Author and we would 
like to share It with you... 

If with pleasure you are viewing 

Any work a man Is doing 
And you like him, or If you love him, 
say It now! 
Don't withhold your approbation 

'Till the parson makes oration 
And he lies with snowy lilies o'er Ms brow. 
For no matter how you shout It 

He won't really care about It 
He won't know how many tear drops you have shed. 
N you think some praise Is due him 

Mow's the time to hand It to him 
For he cannot read his tombstone when he's deed I 
More than fame and more than moitey 

Is the comment kind and sunny 
And the hewty wrarm approval of a friend; 
OhI It gives to Hie a savor 

And strengthens those who waver 
And gives one heart and courage to the end. 
H one earns your praise - bestow HI 
H you like Mm • let Mm know HI 

Let the words of true encouragement be said! 
Let's not waH 'titi life Is over, 

Artd he lies beneath the clover 
For he cannot read Ms tombstone when he's dead. 
There is no substitute for prelse from a weii-meaning and good 
heart. 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



A funeral Mass was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
Ann's Church, Wollaston, 
for Charles E. Cahill Jr., 
65, of Sandwich, formerly 
of Quincy. 

Cahill was a banker in 
Quincy for 40 years and 
was an organizer of the 
Bankers Softball League. 
He died June 24 in New 
England Deaconess 
Hospital after a long 
illness. 

Mr. Cahill bad suffered 
from diabetes for many 
years and had lost the 
sight of one eye. He had 
used a wheelchair 
recently. 

He started his banking 
career with South Shore 
bank and remained there 
for 15 years, working in 
the data processing 
department. He joiiied the 
Hancock Bank accounting 
and was employed there 
for 25 years until retiring 
for health reasons seven 
years ago. 

He taught at the 
American Institute of 
Banking in Boston. 

As a young man, he 
played third base for North 
Quincy High School. He 
also played on the 
Wollaston American 
Legion team. 

Mr. Cahill was a co- 
founder of the Bankers 
Softball League, he played 
Softball into his 50's. 



A torpedo operator on 
Navy submarines from 
1946 to 1948, he enrolled 
at Boston University after 
his discharge and earned 
his degree. 

Cahill was born in 
Boston and lived most of 
his Hfe in Quincy. He was 

a member of the American 
Legion. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Joan E. (Manning) 
Cahill; five sons, Peter K. 
Cahill of Hingham, 
Edmund Cahill of New 
York, Kevin Cahill of 
Marshfield, Charles M. 
Cahill and Paul Cahill, 
both of Quincy; six 
daughters, Cheryl A. Alsip, 
Mary E. Cahill and 
Danette Cahill, all of 
Quincy, Therese M. Cahill 
of South Boston, Ann 
Smith of Canton and 
Christine J. Cahill of 
Dorchester; a brother, 
Francis P. Cahill of 
Quincy; a sister, Barbara 
C. Cahill of California; 
and 11 grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 
Arrangements were by 
Keohane Funeral Home, 
785 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the Joslin Diabetes 
Center, 1 Joslin Place, 
Boston 02215. 



Ruth Bearce, 94 



A private funeral 
service for Ruth 
(McCausland) Bearce, 94, 
of Quincy, was held. 

Mrs. Bearce died June 
21 at Sharon Manor 
Nursing Home. 

She was a member of 
Reliance Rebekah Lodge 
and a longtime member of 
Union Congregational 
Church in Wollaston. 

She was born in 
Pittsfield, Me. 



Wife of the late Byron 
E. Bearce, she is survived 
by a son, James E. Bearce 
of Sharon; two 
grandchildren, Kenneth A. 
Bearce and Jessica Marie 
Bearce, both of Whitman; 
and three nieces. 

Burial was in ViUage 
Cemetery, Pittsfield. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 



MONUMENTS 


QUINCY 
MEMORIALS Inc. 




Cemetery Lettering 






Cleaning 








vases 
Vigil Lights 




iSWiilardSt. 




Sculpturing 
Rose Quartz 




Quincy 02169 




Mausoleums 








l\Aarfcers 
Cotonial Tablets 




"On The Expressway" 




Stant Markers 




Exit 9 Near E. Milton Sq. 


J 


Bronze Markers 


L 




|617-471-0250| 


Free Illustrated Catalog 
Budget Terms Available 



Oive^/tey JSroikers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY. MASS. 

472-6344 



A Viking funeral 
service for Walter S. 
Swanson, 82, of Stuart, 
Fla., formerly of Quincy, 
was held June 23 in the 
Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 

Mr. Swanson died June 
20 at home after a brief 
illness. 

He was a retired painter 
and a life member of the 
Elks Lodge and Stenkil 
Lodge. He was also a 
member of the Quincy 

Masonic Club and the 
Viking Club in Braintree. 

Born in Belkinge, 
Sweden, he attended 



school in Sweden and 
lived in Quincy for several 
years before moving to 
Florida 15 years ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Helen M. (Larson) 
Swanson; a son, Robert 
Swanson of West 
Barnstable; a daughter, 
Sandra D'Angelo of Stuart; 
two sisters, Ellen 
Olafasson of Salvesburg, 
Sweden, and Sonja 
Mortenson of Marshfield; 
and four granddaughters. 

Burial was private. 

Donations may be made 
to the Viking Scholarship 
Fund, 410 Quincy Ave., 
Braintree, MA 02184. 



Margherita Brady-Sartori, 71 



Retired Nurse's Aide 



A funeral Mass was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
John the Baptist Church, 
44 School St., Quincy, for 
Margherita (Somontes) 
Brady-Sartori, 71, formerly 
of Quincy. 

Mrs. Brady-Sartori, a 
retired nurse's aide, lived 
in Abington for the last 10 
years, she was also a 
waitress at many Quincy 
restaurants. She died June 
24 at Spalding 
Rehabilitation Hospital in 
Boston. 

She is survived by four 
sons, Kenneth J. Brady of 
Weymouth, Dennis M. 
Brady of Boston, Bernard 
Brady of Quincy and Scott 
D. Brady of Holbrook; one 



daughter, Kathleen M. 
Morrison of Rockland; two 
brothers, Ezo Somontes of 
California and Mario 
Somontes of Quincy; two 
sisters, Mabel Ostland and 
Elana Eisnor, both of 
Florida; five grandchildren 
and four great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. Arrangements 
were by Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals, I 
Independence Ave., 
Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the Massachusetts 
Chapter of Arthritis 
Foundation, Chatham 
Center, Suite 450, 29 
Crafts St., Newton 02160. 



Orfeo L. Sacchetti, 84 

Woodcarver, Former Shipfitter 



A funeral Mass for 
Orfeo L. Sacchetti, 84, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
June 25 in St. John the 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Sacchetti died June 
21 at Quincy Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

He was a woodcarver 
for several Boston 
companies and a shipfitter 
at the Fore River shipyard 
during World War II. Up to 
the time of his death, he 
was still working at 
woodcarving part time. 

Bom in Worcester, he 
was raised and educated in 
Quincy where he lived 
most of his life. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Lita (Quintiliani) 
Sacchetti; two sons. 



Ronald Sacchetti of 
Richardson, Texas and 
Richard Sacchetti of 
Chelmsford; a brother, 
Gino Sacchetti of 
Braintree; two sisters, Ada 
Varano and Rena 
Capabianca, both of 
Quincy; eight 

grandchildren, four great- 
grandchildren and many 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Diabetes 
Association, P.O. Box 
1221, Framingham, MA 
01701. 



Fashion 

Eyewear 

SAVE 

*35 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 



JWl OPTICAL & 

• D« HEARING AIDS J 



USb t« 1 1 IM9IM ICfl ^H ■IflTiTS 



773-3505 • 773-4174 

"Ai^f $499 

Complete 

30' Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



MaismN • AVAMr.ARnF • nqraRnFiiPfniTA » vyps^aiigT ishbfut 



William E. Hiatt, 46 

Former Asst. Vice President 
At Bank Of Boston 



A funeral service for 
William E. Hiatt, 46, of 
Quincy, was held June 24 
in the Hamel, Wickens 
and Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St. 

Mr. Hiatt died June 22 
after a long illness. 

He was a former 
assistant vice president at 
the Bank of Boston. 

He was an Army 
veteran. 

Bom in Fairfield, Iowa, 
he attended Northeast 



Missouri State Teachers 
College. 

He is survived by his 
father and stepmother, 
Robert L. Hiatt and Jean 
Fielder Hiatt; a brother 
and a sister, Roger L. Hiatt 
and Constance S. Hiatt 
Inman; a niece, three 
nephews, and a 
grandnephew. 

Burial was in Fairfield. 

Donations may be made 
to the Boston Living 
Center or to the AIDS 
Action Committee. 



Joseph A. Orlandino, 54 

Bus Driver For YMCA In Needham 



A funeral Mass for 
Joseph A. Orlandino, 54, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday in St. John the 
Baptist Church. 

Mr. Orlandino died June 
26 at Quincy Hospital. 

He was a bus driver for 
many years, most recently 
with the YMCA of 
Needham. He had 
previously worked for 
Merritts Bus Company and 
the Boston National 
School Bus Company. 

Bom and educated in 
Everett, he lived in Quincy 
for 12 years. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mary L. (Leone) 



Orlandino; six brothers, 
Robert Orlandino, Edmund 
Orlandino, Louis 

Orlandino, Dennis 
Orlandino and Ronald 
Orlandino, all of Revere, 
and James Orlandino of 
Medford; two sisters, 
Lillian DiMillo of 
Wilmington and 

Bernadette Garrett of 
Everett; and many nieces 
and nephews. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 

Funerals, 1 Independence 

Ave. 



Ruth L. Brown, 78 

Retired Government Secretary 

A funeral service for She enjoyed traveling 



Ruth Louise (Copeland) 
Brown, 78, of Conway, 
formerly of Quincy, was 



and loved animals. 

Wife of the late Charles 



held June 25 in the Franklin Brown, she is 
Deware Funeral Home, survived by a son and 



576 Hancock St. 



daughter, Gary J. Brown of 



Mrs. Brown died June Salem, N.H., and Judy A. 
23 at home after a long Clocher of Conway; a 



illness 

A secretary with the 
federal government for 20 
years, she retired in 1965 



brother, Norman Copeland 
of Quincy: and several 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 



Born and educated in Wollaston Cemetery. 

Quincy, she lived in Donations may be made 

BiUerica before moving to '<> ^^^ Animal Rescue 

Conway a year and a half League, 10 Chandler St., 

agQ Boston. 

Helen M. Lovell, 74 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield Supervisor 



A memorial Mass for 
Helen M. Lovell, 74, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
June 25 in St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mrs. Lovell died May 
30 in Clearwater, Ha. 

A training supervisor for 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield in 
Boston for 16 years, she 
retired in 1982. 

Bom in Boston, she 
spent the winter in Florida 
and the summer in Quincy 
for 14 years. 

She is survived by her 



husband, Walter J. Lovell; 
a stepdaughter, Linda 
Frucci of Hingham; and 
three grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Hospice, 300 East Bay 

Drive, Largo, Ra., 34640 
or to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Church of^ 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St, Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 1 1 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

\^Rcctoiy-21 Gay.St. 773-1021 ^ 




Religion 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Qalncy Sun Page 13 

Union Congregational 



Bethany Congregational 



Morning worship at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., will be 
held Sunday at 10 a.m. 

Rev. M. James 
Workman, former pastor of 
First Congregational 
Church in Braintree, will 
be the guest preacher. 

Scripture reader will be 
Winslow Bettinson. The 
musical portion of the 
service will feature 
Pauline Anderson, soprano 
and guest organist, Helen 
Sargent. 

Greeters will be 
Herman and Dorothy 
Mersereau. Hosting the 
fellowship hour following 
the worship service will be 



Joanne and Warren 
French. 

The Bible Study group 
will meet Sunday at 8:30 
a.m. Bethany Church is 
accessible to the 
physically handicapped 
via a ramp on the Spear 
St. side of the church. 

The Rev. Roger 
Ketcham has submitted his 
resignation as minister of 

Bethany Congregational 
Church as of June 27. At a 
special meeting of the 
church members on 
Sunday following the 
morning service the 
resignation was accepted. 
Rev. Ketcham began his 
pastorate at Bethany 
Church in September, 
1991. 



A victim of World War 
I will be remembered at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Union 
Congregational Church, 
136 Rawson Rd. 

The Rev. John C. 
Swanson will reflect on 
the life of Raymond E. 



Melendy, who lived at 1 14 
Rawson Rd. Melendy was 
killed Nov. 1, 1918, 10 
days before the Armistice. 

The altar in the 
sanctuary at the church 
was built in Melendy 's 
memory. 



St. Chrysostom's 



St. Chrysostom's 
Episcopal Church, 1 
Linden St., will hold its 
summer worship services 
Sunday, July 4 through 
Sunday, Sept. 5. 

Services at the church 
will include Holy 
Eucharist at 8 and 10:15 



a.m. At 9 a.m. Holy 
Eucharist will be 
celebrated at Wollaston 
Beach across from Caddy 
Park. 

In the event of rain, 
beach services will be 
cancelled. 



Covenant Congregational 



Houghs Neck Congregational 

The Houghs Neck be a coffee hour in the 
Congregational Church, conference room 



Rev. LuAnn Johnson 
will deliver the sermon 
titled, "No Other Name," 
at the 10:45 a.m. worship 
service of the Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts. 

In honor of 

Independence Day, the 
choir will sing "Battle 
Hymn of the Republic" 
before their summer hiatus. 
Richard Smith, Minister of 
Music, will direct and 
accompany as well as play 
an organ prelude. 

An attended nursery is 
available for children age 

United 
Methodist 

Lay speaker Becky 
O'Brien will preach on 
"Liberty And Justice For 
All" at the 10 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at Quincy 
Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Scripture reader will be 
Barbara Fielding. Music 
will be by Marion Elkhill, 
organist. Greeters will be 
Donald and Florence 
Hunter. Ushers will be 
John and Richard Potter. 

Hostesses at the 
fellowship hour in 
Susannah Wesley Hall 
will be Joanne Nolan, 
Phyllis Ellison, Judy 
Malloy and Margaret 
Minyard. 



four and younger. 

Sunday School will not 
meet every Sunday 
morning during the 
summer, but there will be 
activities for all members 
during the summer. 
Tickets have been 
purchased for a Pawtucket 
Red Sox game in August. 

For more information 
about church activities, 
call the church office at 
479-5728. 



310 Manet Ave., Sunday 
worship service is at 9:30 
a.m. 

Dr. Peter Corea will 
preach the sermon, "Two 
Views of Freedom." Rod 
Hicks, Alpha Story, 
Dorothy and Harold Sparks 

will serve for the 
Diaconate at the 
communion service. 
Organist Arden Schofield 
will sing and Gayle 
Mackey will sing. 

Ron Lemieux is the 
greeter for July. There will 



immediately following the 
service. 

The church is air 
conditioned and has 
wheelchair ramps. Non- 
perishible food and ps^r 
products are collected 
each Sunday for PSSB 
Pantry Shelf and Father 
Bill's Place. 



American Heart 
Association 




"It's good to know that everything 
is taken care of ahead of time .J' 



When you plan your funeral 
with Forethought* funeral 
planning, there's no doubt about 
your expressed wishes. 

You can also choose the 
payment plan that best suits 
your budget. Then you can rest 
assured that it's all taken care 
of. 



Call us today ... 

HAMEL WICKENS & TROUPE 

Funeral Home, Idc. 
26 Adams St., Quincy (617)472-5888 
Funded by policies with Forettiou^t Life Insurance Company 




Independence! 
Freedom! 

The blessings of life within our country as we 
are privileged to live it. 

May future generations Judge that we were 
worthy according to how we preserve it for 
them. 

A 

Servtng All Faiths 
& All Naiionai'hes 

Deware Funeral Home 




576 Hancock Street 
Quincy, MA 



D. Scott Deware, President and Senior Counselor <4 Funeral Director 
Donald S. McCarthy, Sr, Senior Counselor <f Funeral Director 
Kenneth F. Bennett, Senior Counselor & Funeral Director 

Now affiUated with J.S. Waterman Se Sons / Eastman - Waring 



617-472-1137 



Page 14 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



Quincy Lodge Of Elks 
Flag Day Ceremony 




LEO NUNNARI, exalter ruler of the Quincy Lodge of Elks, greets Flag Day ceremony 
speaker Geraldine Shepherd, third vice president, Massachusetts State Association of 
Emblem Clubs. 




QUINCY LODGE OF Elks Scholarship recipients are joined by lodge officers. Back, 
from left, Jerry LaFlamme, trustee; Steve O'Donnell, lecturing knight; Susan Shea', 
Fontbonne Academy; Ana Sheehan, Norwell High; Courtney Murphy, Notre Dame 
Academy; Rob Guarnieri, Boston College High School; Brenda Gibbons, Thayer 
Academy; George Alcott, secretary; Paul Connors, scholarship chairman; Leo Nunnari, 
exalted ruler. Front, Jim McGregor, chaplain; Kimberly Hartnett, Milton; Erin Brick, 
Girls Catholic High; Gina Climo, Melissa Costales and Joanne Curreri, North Quincy 
High. 




FOUR EAGLE SCOUTS were honored during a recent Flag Day ceremony at Quincy 
Lodge of Elks. From left, Frank Westberg, Eric LoPorto, Stephen Oakes and Mark 
Ward. Joining them is Flag Day Chairman Tom Shepherd. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

Public Meeting On 
Area Beaches July 6 



The Joint Commission 
on the Future of Boston 
Harbor Beaches will hold 
a public meeting Tuesday, 
July 6 at 7 p.m. in the 
second floor conference 
room of Quincy City Hall, 
1 305 Hancock St. 

Quincy residents are 
invited to review the 
commission's recom- 
mendatjons regarding po- 
tential projects to enhance 
the area's beaches. 



According to Paul 
Kennedy, a member of the 
Beaches Commission and 
a member of the Quincy 
Conservation Commission, 
the commission has 
included in its recom- 
mendations the ideas that 
were expressed by 
residents at its initial 
meeting held last fall. 
Attendees of that meeting 
have been mailed a dralt 
of the recommendations. 



"The commission looks 
forward to the continued 
participation of Quincy 
residents in this effort," 
Kennedy added. 

For more information, 
call Vineet Cupta of the 
Metropolitan District 
Commission at 635-4505 
or Thomas Koch, 
executive secretary to 
Mayor James Sheets, at 
376-1990. 



Downtown Ammunition 
License Denied 



Cont'd From Page I 

granted at the site because 
of "the type of message it 
environmentally sends." 

Applicant Paul Miller 
said he and his partner. 
Glen McAuliffe, had taken 
all necessary precautions 
in a case of a break-in at 
the store. He said he would 
have an alarm system at 
the site which would 
automatically dial the 
police station during any 
break-in, as well as a 
backup Honeywell system 
which would notify 
authorities in the event of 
the phone lines being cut. 

Miller said iron bars 
would also be placed on 
the windows and doors at 
the site, further frustrating 
any would-be burglar. 

Board members 

remained firm in their 
opposition, but agreed that 
if no ammunition hcense 
were granted, they would 
have no problems with the 



store being operated at the 
site. 

Miller said the 
ammunition license would 
probably be "50 to 80 
percent" of the store's 
drawing power, and his 
partner agreed. 

"Fishing and camping 
are more seasonal than 
hunting," said McAuhffe. 

Building Inspector 
Matthias Mulvey, the only 
board member who spoke 
in favor of the license, 
noted that Mdler already 
has a license from the 
federal government 
allowing him to buy and 
sell weapons from his 
home. Mulvey said that by 
applying to the board for 
the license to open the 
store, Miller was seeking 
to make the weapons sales 
a "legitimate" business. 

"These people have 
good character," said 
Mulvey. "There is a 
proliferation around the 



United States of people 
with these (federal 
government) licenses 
working out of basements, 
their homes, or whatever. 
He (Miller) wants to go 
legitimate with this." 

When Mulvey made a 
motion to grant the 
ammunition license 
request, however, it was 
not seconded by a single 
board member. 

"The motion fails," said 
City Clerk Joseph Shea, 
the board chairman. 
"Gentlemen (Miller and 
McAuhffe), you'll have to 
come before us at a later 
time." 

Shea said after the 
meeting that because the 
motion received no .second 
and the board did not 
actually take a vote on the 
matter, the applicants may 
reapply for the same 
license at a different 
location whenever they 
choose to do so. 



Bethany Pastor Resigns 
After Stormy Ministry 



Cont'd From Page 1 

Rev. Ketcham said, "No 
comment" and hung up. 

The Sun also asked his 
attorney, George G. Burke, 
to comment on the matter. 
Burke would only say: 

"There are two sides to 
this. He had many friends 
and supporters in the 
church who were with him. 
He is a very fine man. 

"A friendly disposition 
of the matter was reached 
on both sides." 

Church Moderator Lisa 
Andre was also asked to 
comment. 

"1 wasn't prepared for a 
call from a newspaper so I 
have no comment other 
than he did resign and we 
did accept the 
resignation." 

Andre reportedly 
submitted her resignation 
as moderator effective in 
September. Her husband, 
John, a retired Quincy 
police officer, plans to 
enter the ministry and they 



will move to Maine where 
he will study at the Bangor 
Theological Seminary. 

Harry Massey, Jr., of 
Easton, formerly of 
Quincy, was elected 
moderator-elect. 

William MacDonald of 
Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, chairman of the 
Church Committee, also 
had no comment on the 
resignation. 

He said his committee 
will conduct a search for a 
permanent replacement for 
Rev. Ketcham. 

The committee held an 
emergency meeting 
Monday night to find an 
interim minister for this 
Sunday's worship service. 

Rev. M. James 
Workman, former pastor of 
First Congregational 
Church in Braintree, was 
selected. Ironically, the 
title of his sermon Sunday 
will be "A Rainbow for 
God's Children After the 
Storm." 



Rev. Ketcham came to 
Bethany in September, 
1991 succeeding Rev. J. 
William Arnold. He was 
serving at three churches 
in the New Braintree area 
when he was called in 
June of that year. He is a 
former New York civil 
engineer. 

Earlier this year. Rev. 
Ketcham was named 
"Man of the Year" by the 
Protestant Social Service 
Bureau. 

That in itself touched 
off a controversy as those 
members of the church 
dissatisfied with bis 
performance as pastor 
criticized his selection for 
the honor. 

A letter sent to the 
Protestant Bureau pro- 
testing his selection cited 
such alleged problems as 
inappropriate language, 
and actions, using 
incorrect names at 
weddings and funerals and 
other alleged incidents. 



Residents To Receive Discount 
On Flood Insurance Policies 



Quincy residents will 
receive a five percent 
discount on flood 
insurance as policies are 
renewed on or after Oct. 1 . 

In a letter to Mayor 
James Sheets, FEMA 
Deputy Administrator 
Francis Reilly informed 
Quincy that the five 
percent discount is a re.sult 
of Quincy's participation 
in the Flood Insurance 
Programs Coniniunity 
Rating System. 



Quincy became 

involved in the rating 
system through the efforts 
of Ward 1 Councillor Peter 
Kolson who brought the 
program to the attention of 
the Sheets administration. 

Earlier this year, DPW 
Commissioner David 
Colton submitted 

documentation which was 
provided by various city 
departments and compiled 
by the engineering 
department. The 

documentation included 



flood plain management, 
flood emergency education 
and flood hazard 
mitigation efforts the city 
undertakes as a matter of 
course. 

The program will 
become a permanent 
addition to the 
responsibilities of the 
engineering department. 
The department hopes to 
improve Quincy's rating in 
future years to produce 
greater savings. 



Bellotti, Ayers Office Hours Tonight 



Rep. Michael Bellotti 
and Ward 6 Councillor 
Bruce .Ayers will hold 
office hours toni"ht 



(Thursday) from 7:30 to 
8:30 p.m. at the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center. 
Citizens are encouraged 



to attend to discuss issues 

on both the state and city 
levels. 



Sun Sports 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 15 



Legion Baseball 



Morrisette Wins Exhibition 
Game At Hall Of Fame 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

After a week off from 
Zone 6 competition, the 
defending champion 
Morrisette Legion baseball 
team returned to Zone 6 
action Tuesday night 
against Weymouth. 

During the past week 
Morrisette broke even in 
exhibition games against 
out-of-state teams. 

The team traveled to 
the Hall of Fame in 
Cooperstown, N.Y., and 
walloped Whitestown, 
N.Y., 9-0, at Doubleday 
Field, Sunday. 

The team traveled by 
bus on Saturday and 
checked into a motel. The 
players visited the Hall of 
Fame and met curator Ted 
Spencer, formerly of 
Quincy, and toured the 
facility. It was the first 
visit to the Hall for most of 
the players. 

Coach Dave Perdios 



Junior Farm 



used five pitchers, Mike 
Patch, Sean Donovan, 
Matt OToole, Pat Bryan 
and Dan Duncan. They 
combined for a four-hitter 
and struck out 10. 

The highlight of the 
game was a long three-run 
homer by Jay Schnabel 
(he also had two singles). 
Also contributing to the 
attack were Dave Reinhart 
with a double and a single, 
Chris Cotter with a double, 
Robbie Kane with a 
double and Donovan, 
OToole, Duncan, Tom 
Malvesti, Adam Calvert, 
Pat Shea and Jim 
Sapienza all with a single 
each. 

Last Thursday night at 
Braintree Morrisette 
dropped a 4-3 decision to 
touring Gainsville, Fla.. 
which was on a two-week 
tour along the East Coast. 

Gainsville starter Ricky 



Burton held Morrisette to a 
single by Schnabel. he 
hurt his arm and was 
relieved in the fifth inning. 

The Florida team led 
off the game with three 
straight hits off starter 
OToole but scored only 
one unearned run. 

It scored another run off 
Donovan on a hit, double 
steal and ground out. It 
widened its lead to 4-0 by 
scoring two runs off 
Duncan on three hits. 

Reinhart greeted the 
new Florida pitcher with a 
home run over the left 
field fence, followed by a 
walk to Serge Belcastro 
and a triple by Malvesti, 
who scored on a ground 
out. Duncan also singled 
but Shea and Kane 
grounded out to end any 
ftirther damage. 

Morrisette put two more 
on in the sixth as Sapienza 
led off with a single but 



was thrown out trying to 
steal. Schnabel walked 
and, with two outs, 
Belcastro singled, but a 
strikeout ended the threat 
and the game. 

Morrisette has a busy 
schedule starting with last 
Tuesday's game with 
Weymouth. It played a 
makeup game at Milton 
last night (Wednesday), it 
will play host to Canton 
tonight (Thursday) at 8:30 
at Adams Field, will face 
a New York all-star team 

Friday at 5:30 at 
Braintree, will play at 
West Roxbury next 
Tuesday at 8 o'clock and 
will host East Hartford, 
last year's Connecticut and 
Northeast Regional 
champion that eliminated 
Morrisette from the 
regionals, next Wednesday 
at 7:30 at Adams Field. 




MATT FLYNN of North Qulncy, a ft-eshman, played for 
the Dean Junior College basketball team, whidi finished 
with a 19-8 record tliis season. Fijrnn, a graduate of North 
Quincy High, was one of four point guards. The son of 
William and Maureen Flynn, he was sidelined for a part 
of the season with an ankle injury. 



Ponkapoag Women's Results 



Faiella Indians Win World Series 



The Faiella Indians won 
the Quincy Junior Farm 
League World Series, 
defeating the Chretian 
Cardinals, 8-1. 

The Indians scored four 
runs in the first inning with 
John Fildago, Mike 
DeAngleo, Scott 

Markarian and Chris 
Lockhead scoring the runs. 
James Devlin scored in the 
second, Lockhead scored 

in the third and Fildago 
scored the final run in the 
fourth. 



Dave Germain scored 
the only run for the 
Cardinals. 

Lockhead was the 
winning pitcher, while 
Pete Turowski, Matt 
Germain and Keith 
Doherty pitched for the 
Cardinals. 

In the A Division all- 
star game the National 
League won, 5-3. 

Mark Tetrault was the 
National League MVP and 
Phil McGillicuddy the 
American League MVP. 

In the 6 Division game 



the National League won, 

13-8. 

Jeff Narbonne was the 
National's MVP and 



Charlie Sorrento the 
American's MVP. 



The Women's Division 
of the Ponkapoag Golf 
Course recently held an 
even hole tournament with 
Nancy Carlton and Dottie 

Pitts tying for first place 
and Stella Carvelli, Jennie 
Pentz and Peg Hoy tying 
for third place. 



A fewest putts 
tournament was played 
with Mary Lou Burice the 
winner with IS putts and 
Stephanie Rizza, Mary 

Michaels, Charlotte 
Dickie and Mary Garber 
tying for second with 16 
each. 



GRAND OPENING CONTINUES 



Flavin Rolls In 
Triple A League 



With 
remaining 



one game 
in the regular 
season. Flavin & Flavin is 
assured of finishing with 



the best record in the 
Quincy Triple A Baseball 
League following wins 



over the Tigers, 6-5, and 
Orioles, 8-2. 

Contributing to the two 
victories were Jamie 
Grossi, Kristen Bowes, 
Mark Fowkes, Frank 
Alibrandi and Peter 
Connolly. 



Early Sports 

Deadline 

Next Week 

Because of the Inde* 
pendence Day holiday 
Monday, there is an early 
sports deadline for next 
week's issue of The 
Quincy Sun. 

All sports releases 
should be submitted to the 
Quincy Sun office, 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center, by 5 p.m. tomor- 
row (Friday) to ensure 
publication in the July 8th 
edition. 

The Sun will be closed 
Monday, July 5th and 
reopenTuesday, July 6th, 





Great 

• Decks 

• Fences 

• Shingles 

• Siding 

• Concrete 



Works 

like 

magic! 



Premixed • Apply & Rinse • No Scrubbing 



Our Full - Serve Gas Station has five blends of 
gasoline available for your automotive needs. 

We are going back to the basics, remember the good 
old days of service at the pumps. 

Well, they're back at the one-stop-gas station. We will 
wash your windows, check your oil and check your tire 
pressure. 

Our attendants will greet and service you with a smile 
at the One-Stop-Gas Station. 



Professional, knowlegeable certified technicians 

We do the job right the first time! 



Peters 
AutomojtiA^ 



(61 7) 786-9080 (61 7) 472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 




*rm wmMAmw 



Fully Authorized Car Care Center 

WE DO IT ALU 



J 



Page 1( Quincy San Thursday, July 1, 1993 



Liberty Runs 
Win Streak To 15 



Recreation Summer 
Programs Start Today 



Liberty Lounge remains 
as the only undefeated 
team in the Quincy Men's 
Softball League as it 
defeated Shooters I, 28-6, 
and Dee-Dee's, 19-5, to 
improve to 15-0 in the C 
Division. 

In the Shooters I game 
Leo Graham blasted a 
grand slam homer, a three- 
run homer and two-run 
homer for nine RBI. Scott 
Andrews, Bob Hennelly 
and Spike Fitzsimmons 

had two hits apiece, Brett 
Loud and Dave Wahl had 
bmne runs and Jeff Drew 
and Ed Demarquez had a 
hit each. 

Against Dee-Dee's 
Graham had two more 
home runs, Fitzsimmons, 
Drew, Hennelly, Loud, and 
Andrews had two hits each 
and Willie Parsons and 
Dean Vanelli one apiece. 

In other C Division 
games Noll Electric 
defeated Washington Tap, 
16-8, and Hat Rack, 16-13. 



Steve (Stu) Sulhvan 
slammed two home runs 
and played solid defense 
against the Tap. Chris 
Leoncello and Bill Ryan 
had two RBI each, Don 
Noll and Mike Sbeils had 
two hits each, John Carroll 
had an RBI and Craig 
Wright had three hits. Dan 
Smeiling pulled off two 
double plays. 

Against Hat Rack 
Smeiling went 3-for-3 and 
made four outstanding 
defensive plays, Rob 
Sullivan had an excellent 
defensive plays, Rob 
Sullivan had an excellent 
defensive game, Shiels 
had two hits, Spaz 
Kennedy had a single and 
Carroll was the wirming 
pitcher. 

In the B Division First 
Place Washington Tap 
(13-2) defeated the 
Alumni Cafe, 16-13, and 
Brigham & Women's 
Hospital, 14-2. 

In the Alumni game 
Mike Ash and Mike Bates 



each hit two home runs 
and Bates went 4-for-4. 
Ron Colon, Mike Ainsley 
and Tim Trabucco had 
three hits each, Joe 
Godfrey, Brian Salley, 
Larry McGue and Steve 
Nieters two each and Matt 
Ostiguy, Charlie Hicks, 
Bill Bourikas, Joe 
Prendiville and Matt 
Marks one each. The Tap 
pounded out 28 hits. 
McGue (7-0) was the 
winning pitcher. 

For Alumni Frank 
Reynolds, Mike Morris 
and Kevin Durkin had two 
hits apiece. 

Against Brigham & 
Women's Ainsley had 
three hits, Ositguy, Hicks, 
Nieters, Godfrey, Marks 
and Salley two apiece and 
Bates, Colon and Dave 
Hutchins one each. Marks 
(6-2) was the winning 
pitcher. 

For Brigham & 
Women's J, Powers, Jr., 
and Matt Gibson bad two 
hits each. 



Noble Quarterback 



5 Former Quincy Youth 
Players Oilers* Starters 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

Chris Noble, one of 
Quincy High's premier 
quarterbacks of recent 
years, is one of five 
Quincy and North Quincy 
players who will be 
starters for the Randolph 
Oilers of the Eastern 
Football League, who 
open their season July 9. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



SERVICf 



MOSIK 



AUTO HOME-BUSINESS 
, • DEAOBOLTSINS'.AILED 
LOCKS REKETED 
• DOOR CLOSERS 
PANIC HAROWAME 
AUTO KETS FITTED 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRV. QUINCY 

472-2177 



Noble is joined by three 
former North Quincy 
standouts, wide receiver 
Kevin MacDougal, and 
linebacker Ryan Craig and 
Dave Joyce, a center, and 
Quincy's Joe Baker, a big 
265-pound offensive 
lineman. 

"All five are 
outstanding players and 
should help us 
tremendously," said Oiler 
owner and GM Peter 
O'Kane. "This is our 20th 
year in the league and we 
have been blessed with 
excellent quarterbacks 
throughout the years and I 
believe Noble will follow 
in the same tradition." 

The Oilers open July 9 
against the Boston Braves, 
formerly the Hyde Park 

Jason Baldock 

Jason Baldock, 79 
Brooks Ave., South 
Quincy, has been named 
to the Dean's List for the 
spring semester at the 



Cowboys, at 7:30 p.m. at 
Randolph's Memorial 
Field. Noble played one 
season for the Cowboys. 

Randolph and Marlboro 
Shamrocks usually battle 
it out for the league title. 
Two years ago the Oilers 
topped the Shamrocks for 
the crown aiKl last year the 
Shamrocks edged the 
Oilers for the title. 

The other teams in the 
league are the Mitchell 
Memorial Club Cobras, of 
Middleboro, the Braves, 
the Hockamock team out 
of Mansfield, the 
Charlestown Townies, the 
Medway Tigers, Ocean 
Park, R.I., Merrimack 
Valley and two Maine 
teams, the Sabres and the 
Lewiston Warriors. 



On Dean's List 



of 



University 
Massachusetts, Boston. 

A member of the Class 
of 1994, he is majoring in 
English. ' 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUPSCRiPTiON BLANK AND MA'L TO 






1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME — 
STREET 
CITY 



.STATE- 



2IP- 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
the opening of a variety of 
Recreation Department 
sponored programs for this 
summer. 

Among the programs 
offered are the summer 
playgrounds, boating and 
sailing instruction, and 
instructional and 

recreational swimming. 

The department 
supervises 2 1 

neighborhood playgrounds 
beginning today 

(Thursday), Monday 
through Friday, 8:30 a.m. 
to 1:30 p.m. for a seveii 
week period. 

Activities such as 
sports, games, arts and 
crafts as well as field trips 
and special events are 
scheduled. The 

playground activities are 
for children ages 6 to 16. 
Playground leaders will 
have additional schedule 
information. 

The Quincy Recreation 
Department William F. 
Ryan Boating aixl Saihng 
Facility will conduct 
registration for its annual 
program of rowing, sailing, 
winsurfing and canoeing 
instruction beginiung today 
(Thursday) and Friday 
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
The first day of lessons 
will be Tuesday, July 6, at 
the facility adjacent to 
Black's Creek in 
Merrymount Park. 



Registration will continue 
weekdays throughout the 
summer. 

The Program will be 
open to all Quincy 
residents on a fee basis. 
The instructional program 
will be divided into age 
and skill classes. Youth 
age 8-16 who have passed 
a qualifying swim test will 
be offered classes in 
rowing, sailing, canoeing 
and windsurfing from 
beginning to advanced 
levels. This program will 
be offered daily, with 
classes scheduled at 
various times. 

Interested applicants 
may take the swimming 
tests at the Lincoln 
Hancock Community 
School Pool Tuesdays and 
Thursdays at 7 p.m. 
starting July 6. 

Adults may participate 
in all programs daily from 
4 p.m. to 8 p.m. On a 
limited basis, special adult 
instruction may be 
arranged during the day for 
adults who work evenings. 

Adult and family sailing 
is conducted on weekends. 
Saturday and Sunday hours 
will be 12 noon to 6 p.m. 
The entrance to the 
boathouse is the road 
adjacent to Adams Field 
that proceeds through 
Pageant Field to the 
boathouse parking lot. 

The Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School Pool 
will re-open with its 



instructional swim 
program, for preregistered 
participants, tomorrow 
(Friday). 

The Lincoln-Hancock 
Community School Pool 
will aslo be available for 
recreational swims starting 
Tuesday, July 6. The pool 
is open to Quincy residents 
who obtain a participation 
card in the pool entrance 
on Water St. in South- 
west Quincy. Ther are a 
variety of memberships 
available for family, 
youth, adult and senior 
citezens. 

The new schedule: 
Family Swims: 
Monday through Friday 6 
p.m. to 6:50 p.m. Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday, 7 p.m. 
to 7:50 p.m. Saturday and 
Sunday, 1:50 p.m. to 2:30 
p.m. or 2:40 p.m. to 3:20 
pjn. 

Youth Swims: Monday 
through Friday, 5 p.m. to 
5:50 p.m. Saturday and 
Sunday, 1 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. 

Adult Swims: Monday 
through Friday, 8 p.m. to 
8:50 p.m. Saturday and 
Sunday, 1 p.m. to 1:40 p.m. 

Senior Citizen Swims: 
Tuesday and Thursday, 7 
p.m. to 7:50 p.m. and 
Saturday and Sunday, 3:30 
p.m. to 4:10 p.m. 

There will be no 
programs offered through 
the Recreation Department 
on Monday, July 5, due to 
the long holiday weekend. 



Basketball Camp Opens July 6 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
that the Quincy Recreation 
Department's Basketball 
Camp will be held from 
July 6, through July 9, 
from 8 a.m. to 12 noon, at 
the North Quincy High 
School gym. 

The camp is open to 
boys and girls between 10 
and 15 years old. The cost 
is $24. 

The camp is under the 



direction of Brian 
Buckley, head basketball 
coach at Boston College 
High School and Paul 
Bregoli, former head 
coach of North Quincy 
High School girls' 
basketball. 

A complete series of 
drills will emphasize 
fundamentals of passing, 
shooting, rebounding and 
individual defense, as well 
as some team concepts. 



such as the fast break. 
Scrimmage games will be 
conducted with instructors 
pointing out proper 
techniques. 

Interested persons can 
register for the camp at the 
Recreation Office, 100 
Southern Artery, between 
9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
Registration is taken on a 
first come first serve basis. 
For further information call 
376-1386 (376-1-FUN). 



Baseball Hitting Camp 
To Start July 6 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department's Baseball 
Hitring Instruction Camp 
will be held Tuesdays arul 
Thursdays, July 6-15 from 
8:30 to 10:30 a.m. or 10:30 
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 
Adams Field, announces 
Director Barry Welch. 

The camp is open to 
those of Little League and 
Bath Ruth eligibility. 
Those considered Little 
League eligible must be 



10, 11 or 12 and those 
considered Bath Ruth 
eligible must be 13, 14 or 
15 as of July 31, 1993. 

Cost of the camp is $26. 

The camp will be 
directed by Jack 
Outerbridge, baseball 
coach at North Quincy 
High School and assistant 
coach at Morrisette 
Legion. The camp will 
feature both individual and 
group instruction on hitting 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



Michael John Travers of 
Quincy has been 
recognized for academic 
achievement as a United 
National Honor Roll 
Award winner by the 
United States 

Achievement Academy. 

Travers, who attends 



Michael Travers National 
Honor Roll Award Winner 



a baseball. Participants 
will receive batting 
practice from jugs curve 
ball/fast ball pitching 
machine. 

Interested persons can 
register for the camp at the 
Recreation Office, 100 
Southern Artery, between 
9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
Registration is taken on a 
first come, first serve 
basis. 

For more information 
caU 376-1386. 



Broadmeadows Middle 
School, will appear in the 
United States 

Achievement Academy 
Official Yearbook, 
published nationally. 

The USAA National 
Honor Roll Awards provide 
honor roll students with 



many benefits and services 
and is a great tribute to a 
student's dedication, talent 
and abihty. 

Travers is the son of 
Patricia Travers. 

Grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. John E. Liimehan and 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. 
Travers of Quincy. 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Quincy Sud Page 17 



Junior League 



' 



Rotary N.L. Champs 



Rotary clinched the 
National League pennant 
in Quincy's Junior 
Baseball League after 
defeating Burgin Platner, 
15-7, and Quincy Police, 
7-3. 

Adam Goodrich pitched 
Rotary to its \ win over the 
Police, clinching the 
division title. He pitched 
four strong innings, striking 
out nine. Kevin Shaw 
pitched well in relief. 
Goodrich and Shaw led the 
team offensively with 
Goodrich going 3-for-3 
with his second home run. 
Shaw hit back to back 
home runs, his sixth and 
seventh. Billy Connolly 
doubled and Matt 
Praetsch, Jay Grazioso and 
Frank Curreri had hits. 

Jose Diaz pitched well 
for the Police and Diaz 
and Matt Graham paced 
the offense. 

Shaw and Keeva Tupe 
pitched in the win over 
Burgin Platner. Tupe 
pitched the final three 
innings, allowing one hit 
and no runs and striking 
out three. 

Goodrich went 3-for-4, 



Connolly 2-for-4 and Nick 
Cyr, Curreri and Brian 
Kalil each 2-for-2. 

Todd White, Paul 
Skarsenski, Pat Dugan, 
Jesse Winters and Will 
Tracey hit well for Burgin. 

Chris Bregoli's 
complete game victory 
over the Lions helped 
Continental Cablevision 
into sole possession of first 
place in the American 
League. Bregoli pitched 
three-hit ball and struck 
out 14 in an 8-3 victory. 

Mike Powers continued 
his excellent hitting with 
two singles and four RBL 
He had the key hits in the 
third and fourth innings as 
Cable struck for three runs 
in each inning. 

Chad Fitzpatrick had a 
hit and scored three runs, 
Bregoli reached base four 
times and Mark Dunn had 
a key hit. 

The Lions were led by 
the pitching of Mike 
McEvoy, who struck out 
seven, and Mike Riedy, 
who struck out four. 
McEvoy doubled to drive 
in two runs and Mike 
Keddy and Jim Sullivan 



had the other hits. 

In its previous game 
Cable lost to Colonial 
Federal, 8-5, as Randy 
Feetham struck out 10 for 
Colonial Federal. 

Cable touched Feetham 
for five runs in the first two 
innings with Powers, 
BregoU and Kevin Walsh 
collecting singles. 
Feetham pitched no-hit 
ball over the final four 
innings. 

Feethem also hit a two- 
run homer in the fourth and 
had a RBI single in the 
fifth. Tom Daley also had 
a big game at the plate, 
hitting a first-pitch home 
mn in the first and adding 
an RBI double and a 
single. Paul Markarian 
doubled in two runs as did 
Sean LePebre. 

The standings: 

American League 
Cable, 14-5; Lions, 13-6: 
Beacon Sports, 11-8 
Burgin Platner, 8-11 
Kiwanis, 8-11; VFW, 6-12- 
1. 

National League: 
Rotary, 16-3; Keohane's, 
12-7; Colonial Federal, 10- 
9; Police, 7-12; S.S. 
Buick, 6-13; Elks, 2-16-1. 




THE ROBINS HAD an outstanding season in girls youtli soccer witli Erin Croke's 23 
goals leading tlie team. Front, left to riglit, Ashley Higgins, Maureen Gassert, Katie 
Gassert, ball girl Aileen Croke, Amanda Murphy and Katie Murphy. Back row, Katie 
Faherty, Kerin O'Toole, Krystle Neves, Sara Pateras, Erin Croke and coach Bob Croke. 
Missing are Breanne Therrian and Neilia Giarratoni. 



Babe Ruth International 



Osco, Mansfield Finish 
In First Place Tie 



Babe Ruth 



Bryan Wins 3 Behind 
Strong Pitching 



Bryan VFW won three 
games last week in Quincy 
Babe Ruth League action 
behind the strong pitching 
of Mark Kelly, Jeremy 
Nielson, Jon Ryan and 
David Rowell. 

Kelly went the distance 
to defeat Quincy Fire, 12- 
4. He also had two hits. 
Brian Gates (two hits) 
ignited a five run rally in 
the fifth to put the game 
out of reach. Nielson 
tripled and singled and 
Rowell, Ryan, Stephen 
Wiltshire, Rob Callow and 
Billy Graney all had 
singles. 

For Fire Bob Walsh and 
Ken Hannaford had two 
hits apiece. 

Nielson pitched a 



complete game in 
defeating Local 1139, 8-6. 

Ryan led the attack 
with three hits. Nielson 
had another two-hit game 
and Wiltshire, Callow, 
Rob Churchill and Pat 
Cummings had hits. 

Shortstop Scott Pyer 
anchored the defense 
along with Ryan and 
Rowell. Gates and Matt 
Norton made outstanding 
defensive plays late in the 
game to protect the win. 

Mai Higgins and Mike 
Russo paced the Local 
with two hits apiece. 

Ryan scattered five hits 
and struck out nine as 
Bryan rallied to edge 
Houghs Neck, 6-5. 

Trailing, 5-4, in the 



Osco Drug and Steve 
Mansfield, CPA finished 
in a first place tie in the 
International Babe Ruth 
League, which will open 
the playoffs July 6 with the 
four top teams competing. 

Usco and Manstieia 
finished at 11-3. 
Everlasting Engraving (9- 

5) and Speedy Muffler (8- 

6) are the other two 
bottom of the seventh, playoff teams. Vintage 
Nielson walked with two Guitar finished at 7-7, Noll 
outs and stole second. Electric 5-9; Knights of 
Ryan tied the game with a Columbus 4-10 and 
single up the middle. Feenan Income Tax 1-13. 

Rowell relieved Ryan Osco scored six runs in 



and retired the side in 
order in the eighth inning. 
Bryan won it in the bottom 



the last two irmmgs to top 
Noll Electric, 8-4, with 
Kevin Sullivan the 



running by Churchill. 

Callow excelled for 
Bryan with two hits and 
several fine defensive 
plays. Rowell and Kelley 
each singled and Ken 
O'Connell and Kevin 
Cellucci played well as 
did catcher Mike Eddy. 

For HN Mark Glynn 
tripled and Mike Ferguson 
and Aaron Marshall 
pitched well. 



Youth Soccer Results 



Boys Under 10 
Finish On Strong Note 



The Quincy Seahawks 
(boys under 10 Div. 1-A) 
soccer team completed 
their season with strong 
showings in two post- 
season tournaments. 

They placed fourth in 
the Bridgewater challenge 
Cup, tying the Easton 
Tigers, 2-2; defeating 
Bridgewater Bobcats, 5-0, 
playing to a scoreless tie 
with Falmouth and losing 
to Easton, 1-0. 

They also finished just 
short of the semifinals in 
the Eastern Classic 
Tournament, losing to 



North Kingston Tornadoes, 
4-1, and defeating 
Bridgewater Bobcats, 8-1, 
and Easton I, 10-1. 

Playing for the 
Seahawks were Charlie 
Acton, Dan Cabral, 
Michael Campanale, Paul 
Cremin, Ryan Doyle, 
Brian Ferrara, Ryan 



Luigi Aliberti Suffolk Grad 



Luigi Aliberti of Quincy 
recently received a juris 
doctor degree from Suffolk 
University in Boston. 

Aliberti, a 1985 
graduate of North Quincy 



half of on outstanding base winning pitcher, allowing 

two hits and striking out 
six. Brian O'Connor had 
the save, allowing one hit 
and striking out one. 

O'Connor and Jason 
Lumaghini had two singles 
apiece and Katie 
Gallagher, Kerry Ginty, 
and Kevin and Eric 
Sullivan one each. 

John Harter, Mike 
Martin, Joe Lind, James 
Crowley and Lumaghini 
played strong defense. 

For Noll Juerik 
Samborski had a home run 
and Billy Norris and John 
Blaikie singles. Charlie 
Doherty pitched two 
innings of one-hit ball. 

Osco also edged the K. 
of C, 6-5, with Dennis 
Palardy the winner and 
O'Connor again having a 
save. Luke Donaher was 
the loser. 

Kevin Sullivan had two 
triples, Gallagher a home 
run, Daniel Conway a 
double, Eric Sullivan a 
double, Ginty three singles 
and Joe Vando and 
O'Connor two singles each. 
Harter, Lumaghini, Matt 
Louis and John Keeley 
played fine defense. 

Everlasting defeated 
Noll, 15-7, with John 
Lauldcanen pitching a 
complete game with eight 



strikeouts. Chuck O'Brien 
was the loser. 

Laukkanen and Mike 
Lynch had a grand slam 
homers, Steve Shaw had 
two doubles and a single 
and Matt Langille two 
singles and a triple. Mike 
Trayers, Chris Mannix and 
Pat McDonough stood out 
defensively. 

For Noll John 
Parastitides had a two-run 
homer and Derek 
Chamberlain a double and 
single. Doherty and Jeff 
Chu played fine defense. 

Mansfield rolled over 
Speedy Muffler, 15-0, 
scoring nine runs in the 
fourth inning. Vinny 



Sassone pitched the 
complete game shutout 
and had five strikeouts. 
Loser John Hassan struck 
out four. 

Johhny Lee had a triple 
and two singles, Brian 
Shaw a home run, Joe 
Barkhouse and Sassone 
three hits and Jim 
Mastroianni, Brad 
McCauley, and Jamie 
Maclsaac two hits each. 

Brian Shaw, McCauley, 
Judson Sherman-Rose and 
Maclsaac played strong 
defense. 

For Speedy Desmond 
Lui had two hits and Lui, 
Shawn Walsh and Matt 
Allen played fine defense. 




by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 

FREEZING OUT CFC'S 
Most people are aware equipment. 



Graeber, Matt Holt, Shaun 
Jafarzadeh, David Kusy, 
Steven Marinelli, Andrew 
Nestor, Michael 

Petrucelli, David Riley, 
Chris and Michael Roach, 
David Rochon and Chris 
Wilson, Mark Fitzpatrick 
joined the team for the 
Easton tournament. 



High School, received a 
bachelor of arts degree 
from Boston College in 

1989. He is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Aliberti. 



that chlorofluorocarbons 
(CFC's) are largely re- 
sponsible for the deteriora- 
tion of the earth's upper 
ozone layer. It is also a fact 
thatthe single largest source 
of CFC emissions has been 
automobile air-conditioning 
systems which use a re- 
frigerant known as R-12 
(tradename, Freon). In an 
effort to curb CFC emis- 
sions, the EPA has limited 
the sale of small containers 
of CFC refrigerant to certi- 
fied technicians (and sul)- 
stantially raised its price), 
thereby preventing drive- 
way mechanics from re- 
charging their own systems. 
By the end of 1 995, all pro- 
duction of CFC's will be 
phased out completely, to 
be replaced by the non-CFC 
refrigerant R-134a. Up to 
that time, lost refrigerant in 
leaking systems can only 
be replaced by a certified 
technician with recycling 



HINT: It is not possible to 
introduce non-CFC R-134a 
into an older air-corKdition- 
ing system intended for use 
wrth R-12. 

It is very important to 
keep your car properly 
maintained. Our entire staff 
of technicians at LEO & 
WALT'S SUNOCO is dedi- 
cated to providing automo- 
tive service excellence, so 
if its necessary to repair your 
air-conditioning system or if 
you are having a problem 
with your brakes and muf- 
fler, we suggest you come 
in and see us first. We will 
give your car the care it 
should have. For all your 
automotive needs, we are 
located at 258 Quincy Ave., 
E. Braintree (843-1550). 'A 
Place Where Your Car Can 
Live Longer.' Sunoco and 
most major credit cards 
honored. Open: Mon.-Fri. 
6am-9pm, Sat. 7am-9pm, 
Sun. 9am-5pm. 



Page 18 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

UNDER M.G.LI 83A£ 
AND 

M.G.L. 254:5 AND 5A 

UNIT 905-11, 

CAPTAIN'S COVE 

CONDOMINIUM 

200 COVE WAY, 

QUINCY, 
MASSACHUSETTS 
By virtue of Judgement 
and Order of the Norfolk 
Superior Court (Docket No. 
92-1439) in favor of 
CAPTAIN'S COVE 
CONDOMINIUM TRUST 
against NABIL N. 
MAROOF establishing a 
lien pursuant to M.G.L. 
183A:6 on the real estate 
known as UNIT 905-11, 200 
COVE WAY of the 
CAPTAIN'S COVE 
CONDOMINIUM for the 
purposes of satisfying 
such lien, the real estate 
which is scheduled for 
Public Auction at 1:00 
O'CLOCK P.M. ON THE 
14TH DAY OF JULY A.D. 
1993, at 200 Cove Way, 
Quincy, Massachusetts. 
The premises to be sold 
are more particularly 
described as follows: 

DESCRIPTION: Unit 
905-11 of the Captain's 
Cove Condominium 
located at 200 Cove Way, 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
and more particularly 
described in a Unit Deed 
therefore dated June 20, 
1991, and recorded with 
the Norfolk County 
Registry of Deeds in Book 
8981 , Page 1 1 0; subject to 
the provisions of the 
Master Deed of the 
Captain's Cove Condo- 
minium Trust dated 
October 11, 1985, and 
recorded with the Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds 
in Book 6821 , Page 1 , as 
amended, and the 
Declaration of Trust dated 
October 11, 1985, 
recorded with said 
Registry in Book 6821, 
Page 44. 

Said Unit is conveyed 
together with an undivided 
percentage interest 
appertaining to said Unit in 
the common areas and 
facilities of said Condo- 
minium, and together with 
the rights and easements 
appurtenant to said Unit as 
set forth in said Master 
Deed as amended. 

In the event of a 
typographical error or 
omission contained in this 
publication, the descrip- 
tion of the premises 
contained in said Unit 
Deed shall control. 

Said premises will be 
sokJ and conveyed subject 
to all outstanding 
municipal or other public 
taxes, tax titles, 
assessments, liens or 
claims in the nature of 
liens, right of tenants and 
parties in possessk>n, and 
existing encumbrances of 
record, if any, affecting 
said premises. 

TERMS: A deposit 
payable in cash or certified 
or bank check of 
$1 ,000.00 shall be payable 
at the Auction and the 
balance of the payment 
shall be payable by cash 
or certified or bank check 
within thirty (30) business 
days or the Auction. 

Other terms to be 
announced at the sale. 
Captain's Cove Condo- 
minium Trust, by its 
attorneys, Janet Oulou- 
sian Aronson, Esquire 
Law Offices of Stephen M. 
Marcus, 25 Braintree Hill 
Park, #101, Braintree, MA 
02184,(617)849-6185 
Dated: June 7, 1993 
6/17,6/24, 7/1/93 



mm^mm^m 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1274E1 

Estate of WILLIAM J. 

KENNEDY 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the aboye- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that LAUREL 

A. OSTER of QUINCY in 

the County of NORFOLK 

be appointed executrix 

named in the will without 

surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in sakJ 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on July 28, 1 993. 
In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this fourteenth 
day of June, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R*gUt»r o< Probate 

7/1/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92P2277E1 

Estate of MARY A. 

ROSEMOWICZ 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of Norfolk 

To MARIE A. 

FITZPATRICK of QUINCY 

in the County of NORFOLK 

and all other interest 

parties 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JOSEPH 
ROSEMOWICZ of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executor 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on July 14, 1993. 
In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this first day of 
June, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/1/93 



South Shore Bank Receives 
Better Business Bureau Achievement Award 



South Shore Bank of 
Quincy, received the 
Better Business Bureau's 
Membership Achievement 
Award, recognizing 70 
years of continuous 



membership support at the 
bureau's first annual 
awards luncheon at the 
Park Plaza Hotel in 
Boston. 

"For a company to 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 



INVITATION TO BID 
The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts will receive sealed bids for the 
"SQUANTUM FLOODING MITIGATION" project 
until 10:00 AM, local time, on Thursday, July 22, 1993, at 
which time and place, all bkls will be publicly opened and 
read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of the extension of 
520 feet of seawall and resetting rep rap along East 
Squantum Street, installing check valves at two outlets 
in Dorchester Bay, construction of 2 catch basins and 
piping in East Squantum Street, new sidewalk and curb 
construction along the length of the seawall extension 
and repaving as necessary. The work will further 
included the installation of 4 catch basins, 1 manhole 
with a flap valve, 690 feet of plastic pipe, a rip rap outlet, 
filling along the west side of Heath Street, construction 
of an earth berm, and filling at the end of Heath Street 
and Deerfield Street, all as shown on the drawings. 
All work shall be performed in accordance with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works, Standard Specifications for Highways and 
Bridges and Construction Standards, all as last revised, 
unless specified or directed otherwise. 
All work under this contract shall be completed in 90 
calendar days. 

A non-refundable deposit of $60.00 in cash or check 
payable to the City of Quincy, Massachusetts will be 
required for each set of contract documents. 
Bidders requesting contract documents by mail shall 
also include a separate non-refundable deposit payable 
to the City of Quincy in the amount of $15.00 to cover the 
costs of shipping arid handling. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 
business hours of 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday through 
Friday, at the Offices of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, 55 Sea St.. Quincy, MA 02169, on or after July 
1,1993. 

The successful bidder must furnish a 100 percent 
Construction Performance Bond and a 100 percent 
Construction Payment Bond with a surety company 
acceptable to the City. 

Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 
amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bki in 
the form described in the Instructions to Bidders. 
The bidding and award of this Contract shall be in 
compliance with Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 
30, Section 39M, as last revised. 
Bidders attention is called to the requirements as to 
conditions of employment to be observed and minimum 
wage rates to be paid, as determined by the 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries under the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
149, Sections 26 to 27D, inclusive. 
No bidder may withdraw his bid within 60 calendar days 
after the actual date of the bid opening. 
The Contract to be awarded as the result of this 
Advertisement for Bids will be funded by the City of 
Quincy. 

All prospective bidders must obtain pre-bid qualification 
certification from the Massachusetts Highway 
Department Contract Regulations Division, 10 Park 
Plaza, Suite 7552, Boston, MA 02116, prior to obtaining 
plans and specifications. 

All State and City of Quincy regulations in relation to 
Minority Business Enterprise, Women Business 
Enterprise, Minority Work Force, Employment of Quincy 
Residents, as required under City Ordinance No. 532, 
and Minimum Wage Rates shall be complied with. Goals 
for this project are as follows: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a 
not less than ten percent (10%) ration of 
minority employee manhours to total manhours 
in each job category. 

2 . A minimum of ten percent (1 0%) Minority 
Business Enterprise (MBE) and five percent 
(5%) Women Business Enterprise (WBE) parti- 
cipation by state-certified MBEs and WBEs will 
be required and maintained on this project. The 
bidder shall sutwnit complete MBE/WBE forms 
wrth the Bki. 

3. The City of Quincy's Ordinance No. 532, 
requiring Contractors working on City-supported 
construction projects to have one Quincy 
reskJent out of every three workers on the 
project must be complied with. 

4. The Contractor shall pay the minimum wage 
rates for the various tradepersons employed 
under this contract, as mandated by the Comm- 
onwealth of Massachusetts Department of 
Labor and Industries, applicable to the area. 

The City reserves the right to waive any informality in or 
to reject any or all bids when such an action is deemed in 
the best interest of the City. Non-responsive and/or 
unbalanced bids may be reiected. 

David A. Colton 
Commissioner of Public Works 
7/1 /93 



make such a commitment 
for that amount of time to 
any one organization is 
remarkable and deserves a 
special tribute," said Bob 
Williams, President & 
CEO of the Better 
Business Bureau, Inc., 
which serves Eastern 
Massachusetts, Maine and 
Vermont 

Williams and BBB 
Chairman Gary R. Gregg, 
Senior Vice President at 
Liberty Mutual, presented 
the award to Paul M. 
Diesel, Executive Vice 
President of South Shore 
Bank. 

"I was proud to accept 



this award on behalf of the 
bank, knowing that the 
bank has never let its 
commitment to ethics, 
honesty and integrity in 
the marketplace waiver 
even during the worst of 
economic times," said 
Diesel. 

South Shore Bank wus 
joined by 41 other 
members that were 
recognized for their 
membership achievement 
of 25, 40, 65 and 70 years 
of continuous support of 
the Better Business 
Bureau out of a total 
membership of 5,000 
businesses. 



Paul Riemer Promoted 
At South Shore Bank 



Paul R. Riemer has 
been promoted to Branch 
Administrator of South 
Shore Bank. 

Riemer will oversee the 
operational and sales 
functions of South Shore's 
41 branch system. His 
previous position with the 
bank was Vice President 
and Cape Cod Regional 
Manager. 

Riemer joined the 
Falmouth National Bank 



in 1986 as Vice President 
in charge of Retail 
Banking and Marketing. 
Prior to that he was with 
Third National Bank 
(subsequently Bank of 
New England). He has 
over 23 years of banking 
experience. 

He is a graduate of 
Central Connecticut State 
College and the Williams 
College School of 
Banking. 



M^ilHHiJi^.H 



!^m^^mmm 



SUSAN 
DEXTRADEDUR 

Congratulations 

on earning your D. V.M. 

Mom - Dad - G'ma m 



— v^g^M 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92D-1964-D1 

Summons By Publication 

Marek Piechowiak, 

Plaintiff 

V. 

Aneta Piechowiak, 

Defendant 
To the above named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Marek 
Piechowiak of Quincy, 
seeking to dissolve the 
bonds of matrimony with 
Aneta Piechowiak, who 
cannot be found within the 
Commonwealth. 

You are required to 
serve upon Charles 
Gennis, plaintiff's 
attorney, whose address 
is One Kendall Sq., Suite 
2200, Cambridge, MA 
021 39, your answer on or 
before September 15, 
1993. If you fail to do so, 
the court will proceed to 
the hearing and adjucation 
of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy 
of your answer in the office 
of the Register of this 
Court at Dedham, 
Massachusetts. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this 8th day of 
June, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 

7/1, 7/8/, 7/15/93 



THANK YOU 

Infant 

of Praug 

Also 
St. Jude 

B.J.D. 7/1 



Q 



LEGAL NOTICE 



3 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1375GI 

NOTICE OF 
GUARDIANSHIP 
of MENTALLY ILL 
To DORTHEA KYLE of 
QUINCY in said County 
and all persons interested 
in the estate of DORTHEA 
KYLE and to the 
Massachusetts 
Department of Mental 
Health, a petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that some suitable person 
be appointed guardian of 
mentally ill with surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 14, 1993. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham this first day of 
June, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/1/93 



Thursday, July I, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 19 



^ 



I 




FORREhfT 



SERVICES 



•-"ff 



EVEKYBOOrs MARKETPIACE 



^lllllllllllllllllllll 1 WT""W " 



HALLS FOR RENT 

N«wly Renovated 
Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 472-! 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Showers. 

Meetings, Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouinfy 

472-2223 

TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Huxfcapped ^cosssUe. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call32&-9824 

Monday through Saturday 4-7 pm tf 



SERVICES 

II M ' M I II M (II MM I>«I 



SERVrOES 



. W M I M IIIII M IIl l lll MMM iiiiiii MM ^ 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

1 suitat>le for large functions 
(350-f people); ottier suited for 
snialler functions (120 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

472-6234 0/2 



COTTAGES 
FOR RENT 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, house- 
keeping cottages. Stu- 
dio and 3 room avail- 
able. Weekly rentals 
$200-$350. Private 
beach. Tennis avail- 
able. Call 328-1300, 9 
am to 6 pm tf 



APT. FOR RENT 

Waterfront 1 bed- 
room, all new, 
Ig. porch, laundry. 
$650.00/month 
includes 
everything. 
471-3952 
773-3020 



7/1 



APT. FOR RENT 

Near bus line in Houghs 
Neck-Front porch - 2 
l)eclrm. Adults preferred. 
$675.00/month. 472-1 952 
Call after 12:00 noon ?« 



■MU^MU^^ik^^* 



IPRSALE 



Con[)puters, Components, 
systems, upgrades. 

3865X40. 2mb RAM, 130 
hardrive SV6A $999.00 1x9 
Simms $27.00 486 CPLL 
coding fan $32.00 

Steve 825-9899 7/1 



mmmm 



HAND TOOLS 
Vi^ANTED 

Wood or steel plarws. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old hand tools, all trades 
(machinist, pattern matter, 
watchmalwr, etc.) shop lots. 
Also, antiquarian books, 
frames, paintings. Antiques in 
estate lots. 

1-617-558-3839 tf 




S€i 



PRECISIQN 

LAMP 

~REBMR& 

REWIRING 



Tu-nn 

V.OHMa N.< 




EXPERt 

lAMP REPAIR 
I Rf WttlNG 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
OUINCY 



TF 



VIKING 

ROOFING 

Residential 
Specialists 

773-2884 



d/a 



y 



PROFESSQNAL 

,_REeMR 
WMXMS 
&SCREEI\B 



^Cl 



CMmph^MRE 



':m&iM 



Moved - 

SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

New Mattress Outlet -Now at 
Stoughton Center next to 
Post Office-Rte 27/1 38-344- 
4488-Opening Days Saleeos 



Retail Salespeople 
Needed 

1 year minlnHim experience 
required. Sporting Good* A 
T-shirt shop In Marina Bay. 
Call Marc (617) 32t-4141 
Monday-Friday wi_ 



oi?p0Kmmn 



BAHAMA CRUISE 

5daysM nights. UhdartMokedl 
Must Sell LimilBdTK:i«ts$279 
per oouple. 407-331 -781 8 Ext 
4625 MofvSat 9am to 10pm 

7/1 



Tu-nn 

V.OIMa ItOIMa MAMTMI 

LARRY'S 

HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • bisured 
Interior - Exterior Palntbig 
Scroll Celling 
All Home Repairs 

Smell or Large 
1-800-479-2476 tf^ 

Janl-Clean Co. 

bisured - Certified Professional 
Carpet - Window Cleaners 
10% off Carpet Cleaning 
Free Fat>ric Protector with any 
2 upholstery items cleaned 
(617)341-3862 ana 
750 Sq. Ft. 
FREE Estimates 
Ace Hardwood Fk>ors 
Woodfloors. Sanded 
Refinished-repaired 
(617)770-3023 7/18 



ATTENTION 

Local cabinetmaker needs 
work! I will resurface your 
kitchen (with laminate of your 
choice), for loss than half the 
cost of new cabinets. 

QUALITY CRAFTMANSHIP 
/ also reston antique tumlturm. 

W.F. ALLEN 
CABINETMAKER 

Over 30 yrs. experience 
(617) 328-9048 

Leave Message 7/15 



SMALL STUFF!! 

$20 & up. Cleaning, removal, 
yardwork, painting, pick-ups, 
deliveries. Ask about $10.00 re- 
moval deal. 

Call John Boy Services 
328-4596 7/1 



A&T VACUUM 

• 19.95 Overtiaul Special on 

any vacuum 

• Sewing macNne repairing 

• VCR repairing and deaning 
•Sharpening 

(sdssors, knives, etc.) 
•Ored(XLVacumis$249 

• Electrolux w/power nozzle 

$1991 

• Used vacuums $45 & lip 

27BealeSI.,Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



CONSTRUCTION 

Roofing, painting, carpen- 
try, porch work, windows, 
door, gutters. Small jobs and 
vinyl siding. FREE esti- 
mates. T. Sweeney 
825-1210 Reliable mo 



AARONS GLASS 

Lowest prices guaranteed. 
Plate and safety glass, 
screens, custom mirrors 
all shapes and colors, 
tabletops. 773-3290 eoo 



ATTENTION! 

Help an eager young college 
student finance his education 
Looking for: 

- Lawn jobs 

- Hedges Trimming 

- Gutter Cleaning 

- Odd Jobs 

Call for a free estimate and 
help me by letting me help you 

471-8541 
Ask for Ted or leave message 

7/22 



Your South Shore 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

1 1S Franklin St , So Ouincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




BINGO 



Knights of Columbus 

5 Mollis Ave 

Earlybird 7 PM, every 

Wednesday 

2 Winners take all 

Lucky 7s-Bonus 

FREE Coffee-Snacks wzs 



YARD WORK CO. 

e Reliable Lawn 

Mowing Service 
e Expert Bush & 

Hedge Trimming 
e Yard Cleanup 
e Fertilize Lawn 
e Other Work-Ask 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 



CfJI Bill Fielding 
471-6124 



a/26 



Christian Dating Service 

Meet someone special, 

free packet 

No obligation 

1-800-829-3283 7/1 





mmmmmmmm^iifiimmjmmmmmr^m^ 



HHMHUIHMWHMN 



PRAYER TO THE 
BLESSED VIRGIN 
(Never Known to Fail) 
Oh most t>eautiful flower of 
Mt. Carmel, Fruitful vine, 
splendor of Heaven, Blessed 
Mother of the Son of God, Im- 
maculate Virgin, Assist me in 
my necessity. Oh Star of the 
Sea, help me and show me 
herein you are my mother. Oh, 
Holy Mary, Mother of God, 
Queen of Heaven and Earth! I 
humbly beseech you from the 
l>ottom of my heart to succor 
me in this necessity. There are 
none that can withstand your 
power. Oh, show me herein you 
are my mother. Oh Mary con- 
ceived without sin, pray for us 
who have recourse to diee (3x) 
Hdy Molt>er. 1 place this cause 
in your hands (3x) Holy Spirit, 
you who solve all problems, 
light roads so that I can attain 
my goal. You viho gave me 
divine gift to forgive and forget 
all evil against me and that in all 
instances in my life you are 
with me. I want in this short 
prayer to thank you for all things 
as you confirm once again that 
I never want to be separated 
from you in eteinal glory. Thank 
you for your mercy toward me 
and mine. The person must say 
this prayer 3 consecutive days. 
After 3 days the request will t>e 
granted. This prayer muiit be 
published after the favor is 
granted. 

KMD. 7/1 



O'HARTE MASONRY 

Complete Masorvy 

Sen/ioe Uc. & Ins. 

Phone Ted 

at 773-8622 

after 7 p.m. 7/n 



SULLIVAN' 

Pruning, removalt, 

cableing, fertilizing, 

brush chipping. 

Fully ln»W9d Ft^Ett 

Mike 472-3595 m 



FROIANE 

20LaiANK 

DCHANGE 

S799 

WBTOMCrCNDr 

QHIf 

SBfiyMK 



FOR SALE: 

Whirlpool Washer 

arxl Electric Dryer 

Washer-2 speed, 3 cyde, Oryer- 

5 cyde, 4 temp., $1 50/both. Wil 

sell seperately. 773-3966 m 



Typesetting Equipment 
For Sale 

2 Varityper Compact 351 

with Fonts 

1 Selectline PermaKwik 
Processor 

BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 



ai^ 
^%^ 



MAIL TO: THE OUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St.. Quincy. MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment mutt accompany order. 



RATES 



INDEX 



a Services 

a For Sole 

D Autos 

a Boots 

a For Rent 

O Wonted 

D Help Wanted 

a Pets, LIveaiock 

a Lost and Found 

a Reel Estate For Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

a Miacellsneous 

a Work Wanted 

a Antique* 

O Coins A Stamos 

D Rest Home* 

a Inatruction 

a Day Care 

a Personal 

D Electrical A Appliances 



S-7WUKt 

t-iawmct 



1S^ 

OR MOKE 



D $6.00foronelnsertk)n,upto20wofds,lWfore«*addltk)nalword. 
D $4.e0 per Insertten up to 20 words for 3-7 Insertions of the same ad, 

IOC each addtttonal word. 
D $4J0 per Insertton up to 20 words for 8-12 Insertions of the samead. 

10* more each addltk>nal word. 
D $4.00perlnsertk)nupto20wordsfor13orfl»orslneertk)nso«the 

tame ad, 10« each addltkMial word. 



D Enclosed it $ — 
in The Ouincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



-weeks 



COPY: 



MO RIPUNO WNJ. N MAOC AT THM CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
OIAOUNB: MONDAY, MtPJl FLEAM INCLUOE YOUR FHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Page 20 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 




ALUMNI DAY at Snug Harbor School featured former students reading to classes. 
Attorney Michael Long reads a story about baseball great Jackie Robinson to Deanna 

White-Hebert's fourth grade class. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Mosquito Spraying Today 



The Quincy Health 
Department has been 
notified by the Norfollc 
County Mosquito Control 
Project that an early 
morning application of the 
pesticide resmethtrin, for 
the control of adult 



mosquitos, will occur 
today (Thursday). 

The areas east of 
Hancock St. and east of 
Washington will receive 
the application. The area 
may include some of the 
following neighborhoods: 



I 



Apollo Lighting & Electric 
Supply Company 

South Shore's Lighting Headquarters 

jj A Full Line Lighting and 

[ \ Electrical Distributor 

Lamp Shades • Lamp Repairs 

Hrs.: Showroom Mon-Sat 9-5 Thurs9-8 
i^ Supply Counter Mon-Fri 7-5 Sat 8-5 

767-5000 

476 South Franklin St., Rt. 37, Holbrook 



Squantum, eastern portions 
of Atlantic, Norfolk 
Downs, coastal WoUaston, 
Merrymount, Houghs 
Neck, Germantown and 
coastal Quincy Point. 

Selected areas west of 
Hancock St. and west of 
Washington St. were 
scheduled to be sprayed 
Tuesday. 

Sprayings occur 
between 2 and 7 a.m. If 
inclement weather occurs 
(high winds, rain or low 
temperatures), or 
equipment fails, the 
application is added to the 
next scheduled day, or 
rescheduled the following 
day. 



HAVE YOUR PAYROLL, 

SOCIAL SECURITY, 

PENSION, OR ANY 

GOVERNMENT CHECK 

MAILED TO US FOR... 



Car Transport 
Not To Use City 



A car transport 
company cannot use city 
streets for business 
purposes, the Quincy 
License Board ruled 
Tuesday. 

At the request of Police 
Chief Francis Mullen, 
New England Auto 
Terminal owner Michael 
Venuti was brought before 
the board to answer 
charges that he had 
violated city ordinances by 
allowing his company to 
load and unload cars from 
on McGrath Highway near 
Elm St. The business, 
which is located at 190 
Elm St., delivers cars 
around the country for 
people who are moving or 
on vacation. 

Neighbors have also 



complained that the car 
carriers used by the 
company make too much 
noise when they arrive late 
at night and early in the 
moming. 

Venuti, who appeared 
before the License Board 
March 16 because of 
similar complaints, had 
said at the time he would 
use a private lot off Field 
St. for his business. Venuti 
said Tuesday, however, 
that the land at the Field 
St. site had since been 
sold and he again has had 
to use McGrath Highway 
until he finds another lot. 

Mullen said an 
automobile recently 
slipped off a car carrier on 
McGrath Highway, which 
could have caused 



Told 
Streets 



innocent passers-by to be 
injured or killed. 

"This is what bothered 
me before, that something 
like this might happen," 
said Mullen, who referred 
to Venuti 's recent use of 
McGrath Highway as 
"defiance" of the 
itistructions the board gave 
him at its March 16 
meeting. 

Venuti's attorney, 
Melvin Ravech, asked that 
the board continue the 
matter until its July 27 
summer meeting to allow 
time for Venuti to find 
another lot. In the interim, 
both Ravech and Venuti 
agreed, the company 
would not load or unload 
any vehicles at McGrath 
Highway. 



Elderly Woman, Peace Activists 
Picket Outside Quincy IRS Office 



An 85-year-old woman 
who in conscience has 
refused for 26 years to pay 
income taxes in support of 
war and killing such as the 
recent missile attack on 
Baghad planned to picket 
the Quincy Internal 
Revenue Service office 
Wednesday. 

Cynthia Foster of 
Jamaica Plain was joined 




South Boston Savings Bank Direct 
Deposit allows you to have your 
payroll, social secunty, pension or any 
government check mailed directly to the 
bank. Some of the advantages of direct 
deposit are... you can protect against 
mailbox theft. ..you can save time... 
eliminate tnps to the bank, and your 
money is available when you need it. 



SoutI) Boston 
Savings Bank 

- "ALWAYS THE LEADER " - 



Have it deposited m a NOW checl<ing 
account that pays interest * . regular 
savings or money market account 

• No monthly service charge and 
no charge for basic checks for 
Direct Deposit customers 

and 18/65 customers. 

• No monthly service charge 

forS750 minimum balance. 
Under S750balance--$3.00 per 
month + ,25c per check. 

S'O mmimurp danv Daiance 'equirea on all accounts 
10 earn ;nterfst 



MEMBER FDIC/DIF 



MAIN OFFICE NEPONSET CIRCLE QUINCY 

■160 Wes! Broadway 740Gallivan Blvd 690 Adams St 

South Boston 825-9090 Lakin Square 

268-2500 479-9660 



NORTH QUINCY WEYMOUTH NEEDHAM WESTROXBURY 

440 Hancock St 544 Mam St 355 Chestnut St 1833 Centre St 
733-8100 377-1050 449-0210 323-8000 



by representatives of 
various peace organ- 
izations and other sup- 
porters in a demonstration 
which was scheduled to 
begin at noon in front of 
the IRS office at 1458 
Hancock St. in Quincy 
Center. 

They protested seizure 
by the IRS of the elderly 
woman's bank account. 
"I'll be there because I 
refuse to pay taxes for 
mihtary spending, for war, 
for killing," Foster said in 
a statement released to the 
Sun before it went to press 
Tuesday. 

She and her supporters 
deplore the killing of 
innocent civilians and the 



wounding of many more in 
last Saturday's missile 
attack ordered by 
President Clinton. They 
point to the killing of 
hundreds of hundreds of 
innocent, non-combatant 
civilians in military 
actions of recent years 
against Panama, Grenada, 
Lybia, Iranians in the 
Persian Gulf, Lebanon, 
and especially the Gulf 
War, where thousands of 
children have died in the 
war and its aftermath. 

Among those who 
planned to be part of the 
demonstration will be 

members of New England 
War Tax Resistance, and 
of Veterans for Peace. 



License Board 
Takes Summer Recess 



The Quincy License 
Board is in recess for the 
summer. 

City Cleik Joseph Shea, 

@ United W^y 

r^^ II hring\ «ul Ihv h<".l in all iti u\ 



the board chairman, said 
Tuesday the board will 
hold one summer meeting 
scheduled for July 27 at 10 
a.m. in the City Council 
Chamber at City Hall. 

The board will resume 
its regular schedule Sept. 
8, Shea said. 



CHARLIE'S 
MINI-MARKET 



THEI0TTERY 



^ 



Land O' Lakes 
Cheese $1.99/lb. 

COLD KEGS AVAILABLE 

Bud-Bud Lite $13.25 + dep. 

Miller $10.99 + dep. 

Suitcase 

Call 770-3245 

247 Atlantic St. North Quincy 



Historic Quincy 



A Tourist Guide 





A Special Supplement 



^ 



^\^^ 



^ 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 



V" 



\ 



Page 2A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



City of Quincy, Massachusetts 




Office of the Mayor 




^eicome ti) QriMoric Qmncv. 



This year I am proud to welcome you to Quincy, the City of Presidents and extend a cordial invitation 
to visit the National Park Service Visitors Center, located at Presidents Place, in Quincy Square. 

Quincy has many places of historical interest -- the birth-places of two Presidents (the only father and son 
Presidents to serve this great Country), John and John Quincy Adams; the burial places of these two Presidents 
and their wives; Adams National Historic Site (sometimes called the Adams' Summer White House; Abigail 
Adams Cairn; Adams Academy Building (now the home of the Quincy Historical Society); Colonel Josiah Quincy 
House; Granite Railway Incline; Hancock Cemetery; Quincy City Hall (Greek Revival structure of Quincy 
Granite); the Quincy Homestead; and many other sites. 

Soon the U.S.S. Salem will be released to the City of Quincy by the United States Navy to be berthed 
at the former Fore River Shipyard. Plans are well underway for the new United States Naval Shipbuilding 
Museum which will also be at the same location. 

Enjoy your visit in this great City while you brush up on history and come back again soon. 



Sincerely, 



JAMES A. SHEETS 

MAYOR 



i 



'.*;. 



■ 



After Painstaking Renewal Project 



Thuraday, July 1, 1993 Qiuncy Sun Page 3A 



John Adams Birthplace Has Original Look 



The birthplace of John Adams, 
second president of the United 
States, looks like it did when he 
arKl his parents, Deacon John and 
Susanna lived there. 

It took on that "as it was" look 
after a painstaking six-year 
reconstruction project in the 
1980s. 

Visitors to the John Adams 
Birthplace, which peers over the 
shoulder of the John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace on Franklin St., South 
Quincy, can now see more 
completely how the house looked. 
The house is well furnished and 
looks like it did when John and 
Abigail lived in it. 
The final renovation touches were 
to the room where Deacon John 
Adams made shoes. 

The rooms are furnished from the 
period of Deacon John and his wife 
and probably reflected her tast. They 
are furnished not elaborately, but 
sufficiently to have a lived-in look. 

The birthplace was probably built 
in the late 17th or early 18th Century 
for less than $1,000 in the pounds of 
the day and the clapboards were 
hand-hewn from trees that grew in its 
fields. 

The pine clapboards of the John 
Adams Birthplace are unpainted and 
the U.S. Natwnal Park Service, 
which restored the house, insists 
that based on research the house will 
remain that way, despite the fact that 
John Adams was known to have 
preferred it white. 

For more than 80 years they were 
the little red farmhouses at the foot 
of Fenn's Hill. But research turned 
up the fact that Abigail Adams, the 
wife of the second president, wanted 
them "stone" and white in color. 

Since what Abigail wanted, Abigail 
usually got, in the summer of 1980, 
the John Quincy Adams Birthplace 
was repainted to Abigail's taste, the 
"stone" color determined to be a sort 
of off-white mixed especially for the 
occasion from a late 18th Century 
formula. 

The John Adams Birthplace was 
painted white so that both houses 
would look as they did in 1807, the 
year the last Adams lived in them, 
but later research indicated it was 
unpainted. 



The birthplaces, parts of which 
date back to the 17th Century, were 
taken over by the National Park 
Service on May 1 , 1 979, after years of 
semi-neglect due to lack of 
restoration and maintenance funds. 

The John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace re-opened in 1982 for the 
first time in three years after 
undergoing a $175,000 rehabilita- 
tion faithful to the lives of the 
prominent family that lived there. 

If you close your eyes and give 
your imagination full rein you can see 
them now as they were more than 
200 years ago. 




There is Abigail Adams in the new 
pink gingham dress. There is the 
curly-haired infant, Thomas 
Boylston Adams, bouncing on his 
father's knee. And there is John 
Adams, home from the Continental 
Congress in Philadelphia for the first 
time in a year, sitting at the table 
drinking a cup of tea. 

The setting, right down to the 
pewter plates and candlesticks, is 
reproduced faithfully in the corner 
room of the John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace. 

The furnishings of the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace are 
precise reproductions of those that 
were in the house when the second 
president lived there. The originals 
are at the Old House, the Adams 
National Historic Site, from which 
they cannot be removed under the 
ownership agreement with the 
Adams family. 

The most interesting room m the 
John Quincy Adams Birthplace is 
John Adams' old law office, in which 
the elder Adams, James Bowdoin 
and Samuel Adams drafted the 
Massachusetts State Constitution, 
the model on which the U.S. 
Constitution was based. 

The law office is furnished pretty 
much as John Adams had it, 

There is the hutch table on which 
he wrote the State Constitution; the 
bookcase filled with books that 
probably were there in John Adams' 
day, judging by an inventory of his 
law library; his old writing desk and 
two chairs that were copies from 
those in his second law office in 
Boston. 



Pastels of Abigail and John, 
originally done in Salem, were 
photographically reproduced by 



JOHN ADAMS BIRTHPLACE 



photographer George Dow and now 
hang in Abigail's sitting room. The 
originals are in the possession of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Abigail's old kitchen cabinet was 
discovered serving as a bookcase in 
the Old House. 

The cabinet was reproduced and 
installed in the kitchen of the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace along with 
copies of the blue china that John 
purchased when he was emissary to " 
Holland. 



The Adams Birthplaces are at 
133 and 141 Franklin St. They are 
open daily, including Sundays 
and holidays, from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. from April 19 to Nov. 10 with 
guided tours. The last full tour is 
at 4:15 p.m. Admission is $2.00 
for adults and children over age 
16, which also includes 
admission to the Adams Mansion 
within seven days. Park passes 
available. 



The Cover 







QUINCY HISTORIC SITES shown on the cover arc, top row, 
Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces; First 
Parish Church with Hancock Cemetery in foreground, and the 
Adams Mansion. Middle row, Dorothy Quincy Home, the Abigail 
Adams Cairn, the Josiah Quincy Homestead, and the site of the First 
Productive Iron Works. Bottom row, old City Hall, site of the First 
Commercial Railway and Adams Academy, on the site of the John 
Hancock Birthplace. 



J 



i 



Pas« 4 A Qu'mcy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



The Adams Cottages 

Our Only Father - Son Presidents Born Here 



It was the North Precinct of 
Braintree then, a sprawling tract of 
woods and farmlands on the gently 
rolling hills some 10 miles south of 
the Boston Stone along the winding 
Coast Road to Plymouth. 

Something less than 1,500 people 
lived in the North, Middle and South 
Precincts of Braintree in the year 
1735 and two of them were Deacon 
John Adams, 44, farmer and 
cordwainer, and his wife, Susanna, 
26. 

Their home was a weathered gray 
farmhouse with a high peaked roof 
and attached lean-to kitchen set on 
seven acres of farmland at roughly 
Milepost 11 of the Coast Road, just 
where it turned up the wooded 
slopes of Penn's Hill toward the 
Monatiquot River ford. 

He was a pillar of his rural 
community. Mr. Adams was, a 
deacon in the First Parish Church, a 
lieutenant in the Braintree militia and 
a town constable with a forceful 
personality and tact that enabled him 
to collect teixes from his neighbors. 

He was a hard-working farmer 
whose cider was acknowledged best 
in town, he worked in leather during 
the winter months, and he had an 
eye on an adjoining piece of 
farmland, 954 acres owned by the 
Billings brothers, complete with a 
farmhouse similar to his own. 

Susanna Adams was a Boylston of 




JOHN QUINC Y ADAMS Birthplace (left) and the John Adams Birthplace. 



Brookline, socially a cut above her 
husband, and perhaps there were 
moments in the simple house at the 
foot of Penn's Hill when she thought 
of the home of her uncle, the noted 
Dr. Zabdiel Boylston of Brookline, 
whose furniture came all the way 







Welcome to 

Historic Quincy 

Quincy Tourist 

Information Center 

On Mclntyre Mall 

at Quincy City Hall 

Hancock St., Quincy Square 

Across from the 'Church of The Presidents' 

Free Literature About 
Historic Sites Available 

sponsored by 

The Quincy Tourism Association 
1120 Hancodi St., Quincy, MA, 02169 

617^47-0929 




from London. 

Their first child, a son who was 
named John for his father, was born 
in the southeast bedroom of the 
farmhouse on Oct. 19, 1735 (Old 
Style). He would become the second 
president of the United States. 

Deacon John purchased the 
house next door for 500 pounds in 
1744 and it was ready 20 years later 
when young John moved in with his 
brand new bride, the former Abigail 
Smith, the preacher's sparkling 
daughter from the next town of 
Weymouth. 

Their second child, a son who was 
named John Quincy Adams after his 
great grandfather. Col. John 
Quincy, was born there on July 11, 
1767. He would become the sixth 
president of the United States. 

The junction of Franklin St., 
Independence Ave., and President 
Ave. in South Quincy is the only 
place in the country where the 
birthplaces of two presidents who 
are father and son stand side by side 
in the same city. 

The precise age of the two 
cottages at the foot of Penn's Hill is 
not known. 

When the John Adams Birthplace 
was retored by the Daughters of 
Revolution in 1897, a brick bearing 
the date 1681 was discovered under 
the southeast comer, and the house 
was known to have been occupied 



by one Joseph Penniman in that 
year. 

And a man named Samuel Belcher 
was living in the John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace as early as 1663, when it 
was little more than a one-room 
shack with fireplace. It was built to its 
present size in 1716, as evidenced by 
a date brick found in the new 
fireplace. 

According to Henry Adams, a 
grandson of President John Quincy 
Adams, no member of the family 
lived in the cottages after 1818, 
although ownership remained in the 
Adams family until 1940. 

Both houses were restored by the 
Adams Realty Trust, the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace in 1896 at 
a cost of $1 ,650 and the John Adams 
Birthplace a year later at an expense 
of $515.49. 

They were presented to the city of 
Quincy in 1940 and supervised by 
the Quincy Histork:al Society until 
they were turned over to the U.S. 
Natiorial Park Service in 1979. 

The Adams Birthplaces are at 
133 and 141 Franklin St. They are 
open daily, including Sundays 
and holidays, from 9 a.ni. to 5 
p.m. from April 19 through Nov. 
10, with guided tours. Admission 
is $2 for adults and children over 
age 16, which also includes 
admission to the Adams Mansion 
within seven days. 




The Quincy Presidential Trail 




The Adeuns Birthplaces are an 
important stop on the newly 
designated Quincy Presidential 
Trail, a 10.5 mfle route that takes 
the visitor through the 17th and 18th 
Century locales associated with the 
lives of the Adams family. 

Historic sites along the trail 
include the Adams Mansion, 
Dorothy Quincy Homestead, 
Adams Academy, First Parish 
Church, Adams Crypt, City Hall, 



Hancock Cemetary, the Birthplaces, 
Abigail Adams Cairn, First. 
Commercial Railroad, First 
Ironworks, Col. Josiah Quincy 
House and Moswetuset Hummock, 
most of which are described in this 
magazine. 

The Quincy Presidential Trail is a 
National Recreation Trail, the 
seventh in the state of Massachu- 
setts and the 625th in the nation. 



TbtiTMlay, July 1 . 1 993 Quncy Sun P«s« 5A 



The Quincy City Council 

Proudly Serving Historic Quincy 

Today and Tomorrow 




PETER KOLSON 

Ward 1 Councillor 




THOMAS A FABRIZIO 

Ward 4 Councillor 



HISTORIC QUINCY 

The City of Quincy has almost everything a city can 
offer with its brilliant, magnificent shoreline, its na- 
tional historic sites, its two colleges arxi its neighbor- 
hoods, h is rich in heritage, natural and human re- 
sources - arxi it is particularly enriched by its unique 
blerxl of old and new. 

First settled in 1625 at Mount Wollaston, separated in 
1640 from Boston as a town called Braintree, our 
QuirKy was established as a town of its own in 1792 
and incorporated as a dty in 1888. 




TIMOTHY CAHILL 

Councillor At-Large 




Pas* 6A Quncy Sun Thuraday, July 1 , 1 993 




ADAMS MANSION NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



The Adams Mansion 



Summer White House And Home Of 2 Presidents 



Josiah Quincy, the one who built 
railroads around New England and 
founded the cooperative bank 
movement in Massachusetts, was in 
his boyhood a frequent visitor to the 
mansion where John Adams, the 
second president of the United 
States, lived in retirement. 

Later, he wrote with wry amuse- 
ment about Sunday dinner with the 
aging patriarch of the Adams clan ' 
and his wife, Abigail, a dinner that 
inevitably began with a thick 
pudding made from boiled corn 
meal. 

"...it being thought desirable to 
take the edge off one's hunger 
before reaching the joint," wrote 
Quincy. 

"Indeed, it was considered wise 
to stimulate the young to fill 
themselves with pudding, by the 
assurance that the boy who 
* managed to eat the most of it should 
be helped most abundantly to the 
meat, which was to follow. 

"It need not be said that neither 
the winner nor his competitors 
found much room for meat at the 
close of their contest; and so the 
domestic economy of the arrange- 
ment was very apparent." 

Quincy, as a young Harvard law 
student, stopped by several times a 
week in summer to talk and read to 
the former President. He found the 
visits delightful. Indeed, the Adams 
of the cold and austere public mien 
was never more relaxed and warm 
than he was at his country home in 
Quincy. 

The original house, a small part 
of the present building, was built 
probably in 1731 by Major Leonard 
Vassall, a wealthy West Indian 
sugar planter who lived in Cam- 
bridge and apparently used it for a 
summer place. 

His daughter, Mrs. Anna 
Borland, who was a Loyalist during 



the Revolution, abandoned the 
house to leave with the British 
forces when they evacuated Boston 
in 1776. For a while it was used as a 
haven for rebel refugees fleeing the 
war zones. 

Mrs. Borland returned to reclaim 
the house after the Revolution and 
John Adams, then in Europe as the 
first American ambassador to 
London, purchased it for 600 
pounds through the good offices of 
the Cotton Tufts of Weymouth, his 
wife Abigail's cousin. 

The Adamses were about to 
return to the United States after 
seven years abroad and Abigail was 
concerned that John's books and 
papers and the furnishings they had 
acquired in Europe would not fit 
into their old farmhouse at the foot 
of Penn's Hill where they lived 
before. 

The deal was closed on Sept. 26, 
1787, and the deed is still on file in 
the Suffolk County Registry of 
Deeds in which the Adams purchase 
is specified as a house, barn and 
other buildings on seven acres of 
land with some 76 acres more scat- 
tered around the North Precinct of 
Braintree. 

There are indications that Abigail 
was at first disappointed with her 
purchase. It was a lot smaller than 
she remembered it. 

"In height and breadth it feels 
like a wren's house," she wrote to 
her daughter, Abigail, the wife of 
Col. William S. Smith, "Let Col. 
Smith come without heels to his 
shoes or he will not be able to walk 
upright." 

Abigail and John Adams moved 
into the house, which they named 
"Peacefield," after his retirement 
from the presidency in 1801 and 
lived there until they died. 

It was from the "Old House," as 
the family called it, that John 



Adams carried on his long and 
increasingly warm correspondence 
with his old rival, Thomas Jefferson 
of Virginia, who had succeeded him 
in the presidency. In retirement, 
they became firm friends as they 
outlasted their contemporaries. 

"Thomas Jefferson lives," 
whispered John Adams as he lay 
dying in the Old House. He was 
wrong. Jefferson, in far away 
Monticello, Va., had preceded him 
in death by a few hours on the same 
day. 

It was July 4, 1826, the 50th 
anniversary of the Declaration of 
Independence. 



The Old House which served as 
summer White House for two 
presidents, was home to four 
generations of the Adams family, 
the last, Brooks Adams, dying in 
February, 1927. It was taken over 
by the U.S. National Park Service 
in 1946 to become the Adams 
Mansion National Historic Site. 

The site at 135 Adams St. is 
open to the public from April 19 
to Nov. 10 daily from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. The last full tour os at 4:15 
p.m. Admission is $2 for adults 
and children over 16, and 
includes admission to the Adams 
Birthplaces within seven days. 



The Adams Family 



HENRY ADAMS (1583-1646) 
emigrated from England in 1638 
and was granted 40 acres in 
Mount Wollaston (later Quincy). 

2. JOSEPH ADAMS (1626- 
1694), son of Henry, farmer and 
maltster of Old Braintree. 

3. JOSEPH ADAMS (1654- 
1737), son of Joseph, who 
married Hannah Bass, a 
granddaughter of John Alden 
and Priscilla Mullins. 

4. JOHN ADAMS (1691- 
1761), son of Joseph, farmer and 
selectman of Old Braintree, 
known as Deacon John. 

5. JOHN ADAMS (1735- 
1826), son of Deacon John and 
second President of the United, 
States. 

5a. SAMUEL ADAMS (1722- 
1803), revolutionary firebrand; 
great, great grandson of Henry 
and cousin of President John. 

6. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 
(1767-1848), son of John, sixth 
President of the United States. 

7. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS (1807-1886), son of John 



Quincy, minister to Great Britain 
during the Civil War. 

8. JOHN QUINCY ADAMS II 
(1833-1894), son of Charles 
Francis, state legislator and 
thrice candidate for governor of 
Massachusetts. 

8a. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS II (1835-1915), son of 
Charles Francis, historian and 
founder of the Quincy school 
system. 

8b. HENRY ADAMS (1838- 
1918), son of Charles Francis, 
author of "Th Education of 
Henry Adams." 

8c. BROOKS ADAMS (1848- 
1927), son of Charles Francis, the 
last Adams to live in the Old 
House in Quincy. 

9. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS III (1866-1954), son of 
John Quincy II, mayor of Quincy 
and Secretary of the Navy under 
President Hoover. 

10. CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS IV (1910- ), chairman of 
the board of Raytheon Co. 



Thur«i«y, July 1,1993 Q,incy S«, P.fl. 7A 



QUINCY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



A Proud Heritage 

The proud heritage of the Quincy Public Schools, established 
under the leadership of its first Superintendent, Colonel Francis W. 
Parker, continues to the present day. 

And, we are proud and pleased to honor John Adams, John 
Quincy Adams, John Hancock and the other patriots whose values 
and determination helped shape our great nation. 

We are committed to maintaining and providing an educational 
system that is responsive to all of its people by developing skills to 
become contributing citizens, self-fulfilling individuals and competent 
workers. 






EUGENE CREEDON 

Superintendent of Schools 

Secretary 

to School Comnnttee 



JIAMES A. SHEETS 

Mayor 

and 

School Comn\ittee Chairman 



STEPHEN DURKIN 

Vice Chairman 








MARGARET KING 



RONALD MARIANO 



DANIEL RAYMOND! 



1993 



FRANK SANTORO 



UNDASnCE 



I 



Page 8A Quincy Sun Thurcdav. Julv 1. 1993 




THE FIRST PARISH CHURCH 

First Parish Church 



TOMBS OF PRESIDENTS John and John Quincy Adams and their wiv 
in First Parish Church. 



Where 2 Presidents, Their Wives Are Entombed 



In 1949, when the present First 
Parish Church building, the Old 
Stone Temple, was 121 years old, it 
was ruled officially that the church 
is older than the city itself and the 
town before it. 

It was then that the late historian 
William Churchill Edwards was 
called upon to resolve a minor 
dispute that involved the rounding 
of the corners of the church lot in 
downtown Quincy. 

"Almost the first subject to which 
the minds of the earlv settlers of our 
country were turned after they 



landed here was the formation ot a 
church," said Edwards. 

The first church in these parts 
was established as a branch of the 
Church of Boston in 1636. It became 
a church in its own right in 1639. 
The Mount Wollaston section of 
Boston was incorporated as the 
town of Braintree on May 23, 1640. 
Erqo, the church came first! 

Quincy's first house of worship, 
the branch of the Church of Boston, 
was called the "Chappel of Ease," 
and if it was neglected by ea|rly 
historians it was because its first 



Welcome to Quincy 
and the South Shore 

A Nice Place to LivCy Work & Play 

Quality Housing 

Excellent Job Opportunities 

Quality Schools 

Superior Recreation 

Seashore ... Parks ... Clubs 

Modem Shopping Facilities 
Excellent Transportation Network 

The Quincy and South Shore 
Board of Realtors ® 

For infonnadon or help call fc^U 

773-0770 



ffl"/ 



MAS 



0»»O I 1WWtTT 



pastor, the Rev. John Wheelwright, 
his sister-in-law, Anne Hutchinson, 
and others were banished from the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony for 
heresy. 

The new church, the one that 
lasted, was gathered by convenant 
on Sept. 26, 1639, and it was hold- 
ing services in its third meeting 
house in 1732 when its pastor was 
the Rev. John Hancock, father of 
the bold first signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. Son John also 
was a member. 

The affairs of the church and the 
town of Quincy were one and the 
same until 1824 when church and 
state were separated in Massachu- 
setts and the Congregational Socie- 
ty was established to handle 
parochial matters. 

The old Hancock meeting house 
was still standing, although a little 
run down, on the south lawn of the 
present church lot in 1822 when 
former President John Adams 
deeded the interest from certain of 
his lands and granite from his 
pastures to build a stone temple. 

It was completed in Greek revival 
style at a cost of $30,488.56-which 
was some $3,000 less than architect 
Alexander Parrish's estimate-and 



dedicated Nov. 12, 1828, with John 
Quincy Adams, the sixth president 
of the United States holding Pew 
No. 1. 

Even before the church was 
dedicated, the mortal remains of its 
benefactors, John and Abigail 
Adams, were transferred to tombs 
in the crypt of the church and, in 
1852, the bodies of John Quincy 
Adams and his wife, Louisa, joined 
them 

It is the only church in the United 
States in which two Presidents are 
buried. The only other church in 
which a President fs buried is the 
Episcopal Cathedral in Washington 
D.C., where President Woodrow 
Wilson is entombed. 



An active Unitarian Univer- 
salist Church, it is open to 
the public for tours Monday 
through Friday from 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. through Wednes- 
day, Nov. 10. Donation of 
$1 is encouraged. For fur- 
ther information call the 
church office at 773-1290. 



Why Wc Pronounce 
It 'Quin-zee' 



Why do we pronounce Quincy 
"Quin-zee" when just about 
everyone else in the country refers to 
it as "Quin-see?" 

There are 19 other Quincys in the 
U.S., but they pronounce it "Quin- 
see." 

Can they be right and we be 
wrong? 

Not according to Quincy's late city 
historian, William C. Edwards who 
never budged an inch whenever the 
argument ever came up. And it still 
comes up. 

The reason we pronounce it 
"Quin-zcc" is very simple. 

"That's the way the Quincy family 
pronounced it," he used to explain. 



"The original Quincy family which 
settled here at Mount Wollaston 
pronounced it 'Quin-zee,' including 
I Col. John Quincy after whom 
Quincy, Mass. -the first Quincy -was 
named in 1792." 

Colonel Quincy was the great 
grandfather of sixth president John 
Quincy Adams. 

Apparently all 19 other Quincys in 
the U.S. were named after John 
Quincy Adams. 

And, apparently the early settlers 
of those communities thought John 
Quincy pronounced it John "Quin- 
see." 

Anyway, that is how Edwards 
explained it. Seems like a sound 
argument. 



ThuTKlay, July 1 , 1 993 Qwncy Sun P«g« 9A 



City Hall 

Seat Of Government 
For 149 Years 



Daniel and Hannah French 
deeded the land to the town of 
Quincy for $1,000 with the 
stipulation that it "shall not be used 
for any other purpose than as a place 
for a Town House for the said 
Inhabitants," 

And, with a few minor 
transgressions of that vow, the solid 
structure of Quincy granite on 
Quincy Square has been just that for 
the past 149 years, the nerve center 
ot government for first the town and 
then the city. 

It was the great hall on the second 
floor that the popular John Quincy 
Adams II, grandson of a president of 
the United States, held forth as town 
moderator for many years and, with 
his brother, Charles Francis Adams 
Jr., gave informal direction to town 
affairs. 

One of the earliest ordinances 
passed by the first City Council on 
March 8, 1889 was the adoption of 
the City Seal emblazoned with the 
four most significant dates in 
Quincy's history: 

1625, for the first settlement on 
Mount Wollaston; 1640, for its 
separation from Boston as the town 
of Braintree; 1792, for its separation 
from Braintree as the town of 
Quincy; and 1888, for its 
incorporation as a city. 




CITY HALL 

Designed by the architect 
Solomon Willard - who received $280 
for drawing up the plans and super- 
intending construction for five 
months - the City Hall was 
completed and occupied for the first 
time on Nov. 1, 1844. 

It cost exactly $19,115.93 to build, 
including 88 cents to John Briesler 
for lead to seal the chimney. 

In 1979, when a 3 and one half 
story reflective glass addition was 
built behind the old City Hall, the 
cost was $1.9 million. 




Rdey & Rielly Insurance Agency, Inc. 

1050 Hancock Street • P.O. Box 351 • Quiiicy. MA 02269^51 
617-471-6200/471-6015 • 1-80O4J88-1985 • FAX 617-471-5909 

The Midi at Maahpee Commona • P.O. Box 1680 

Madipee, MA 02649-1680 
Telqjhonea: 508-477-2325 • 1-800-365^995 • PAX 508-539«»6 



We Ye proud to be part of 
Historic Quincy. We are 
located on the Freedom Trail. 
Just follow the red line to 
Riley & Rielly^s door at 1050 
Hancock St., where we can 
meet all your insurance needs. 
We pride ourselves on excel- 
lent service. 

Have a safe and happy fourth! 

• Insurance • Bonding • Financial Services 
• Insurance Advisory Services 



With over a centuiy of service, Quincy Hospital combines a caring and highly qualified 
staff, a new state-of-the-ait patient care facility and the most up-to-date medical 
technology available to provide the finest in medical care. 

All Private Patient Rooms 

24-Hour Emergency Department 

Medical/Surgical/Pediatric Services 

Birthing Suites & Ob/Gyn Services 

Adult/Geriatric Psychiatric Services & Psychiatric Day Treatment Program 

Rehabilitation Sendees 

Occupational Health Services 



To find a doctor who is right for you, ca 1 The DoctorLine - 376-CARE - a free service of Quincy Hospital! 




S^m Quiiuy Hospital 

-^^ YouTl like the way we treat you. 



Quincy Hospital • 114 Whitwell Street • Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 • (617) 773^100 



Pag* lOA QuincySun Thuraday, July 1, 1993 



Quincy Was 
Almost Hancock 



If some of the early settlers had 
their way, you would be living in the 
city of Hancock today instead of the 
city of Quincy. 

Quincy, like George Washington, 
was born on Feb. 22. 

On Feb. 22, 1792, the General 
Court of Massachusetts passed an 
act incorporating the North Precinct 
of Old Braintree as the separate 
town of Quincy. 

But, just before that, quite a few of 
the residents wanted the new town 
named after native-son John 
Hancock instead of Boston-born 
Col. John Quincy. 

Colonel Quincy, who had 
represented Old Braintree in the 
General Court, was the great 
grandfather of President John 
Quincy Adams. 

Many people today think Quincy 
was named after the sixth President 
but the honor actually goes to his 
great grandfather. 

John Hancock who was bom in 
the North Precinct, was governor of 
Massachusetts when the General 
Court passed the act incorporating 
the new town as Quincy. He signed 
the act the following day. 

But at the first town meeting of the 
new town in May, a petition was 
presented to change the name from 
Quincy to HarKock in honor of the 
patriot and first signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. The 
move was finally defeated after a 
stormy verbal battle. 

Opponents argued that Hancock 




JOHN HANCOCK 

was still alive and that the honor 
should go to a distinguished-but 
deceased-person. 

Colonel Quincy met those 
requirements. He was both 
distinguished - and deceased. 

He had represented Old Braintree 
in the General Court from 1717 to 
1741 - 12 of those years as Speaker 
of the House. He died in 1767 at age 
77 - two days after John Quincy 
Adams was born. 

Quincy became a city June 11, 
1888. 

But a lot of people will go right on 
thinking Quincy was named 
after John Quincy Adams. 



Quincy has. . . 

Two Well Known 
Independents 

Doran & Horrigan 



19 Billings Road 
N. Quincy 328-0100 




WeWorkfcxYou 




THE GRANITE RAILWAY 



The Granite Railway 

First Commercial 
Railroad In U.S. 



It was the darndest looking 
contraption that many amoung the 
distinguished gathering had ever 
seen. 

Each of the three wagons had 
four wheels, 6 and one half feet in 
diameter, surmounted by a smaller 
gear wheel which was used to raise 
and lower the cargo platform that 
was slung low between the wheels. 
It rode on foot-high wooden rails, 
topped by iron plate, which rested 
on stone sleepers or cross ties, 
placed eight feet apart and firmly 
supported on crushed granite to a 
depth beyond the frost line. 

On Saturday, Oct. 7, 1826, the 
wagons were laden with 16 tons of 
the finest Quincy granite and the 
opening day guests were properly 
amazed when a single horse moved 
the whole thing with ease more than 
three miles to a special wharf on the 
Neponset River. 

The granite blocks, a particularly 
hard and weather-resistant stone 
capable of taking a brilliant polish, 
were en route to Charlestown, 
where they were building a 
monument to the Battle of Bunker 
Hill. 

The Granite Railway, the first 
such commercial venture In the 
United States, was built specifically 
•o transport stone for the Bunker 
Hill Monument. 

That it became successful, and a 
model for others around the 
country, is a tribute to three vastly 
dissimilar men, the engineer 
Gridlcy Bryant, the architect 
Solomon Willard and the financier. 
Col. Thomas Handasyd Perkins. 

Bryant was 27 at the time but 
already an engineer of note. He 
Invented the eight wheeled railroad 
car and, when a fellow named Ross 
Winans of Baltimore sued to 
establish a patent on it, Bryant was 
able to prove his claim to the 
satisfaction of the U.S. Supreme 
Court. 

Willard, then 43, was a great bear 
of a man, gentle, obliging, In- 
dustrious. Frivolity, It was said, was 
alien to him and he was never 
known to run. He could be crot- 
chety, too. He was a carpenter 
turned wood-carver, turned stone- 
carver and, finally architect. 



Perkins was the autocratic, 52- 
year-old merchant king of Boston 
who was said to have been offered 
the post of Secretary of the Navy by 
President Washington and turned It 
down with the observation that he 
owned more ships than the Navy. 

It was Perkins who lobbied the 
Railway's charter through a puzzled 
and obstinate State Legislature, 
which had never been called upon to 
Incorporate a commercial railroad 
before. It was Perkins who financed 
It, too, largely with his own money. 

Even In Its early days, the Granite 
Railway was a tourist attraction of 
some magnitude. 

Daniel Webster, who used to stop 
off for a pick-me-up in Quincy en 
route from Boston and Washington 
to his home In Marshfleld, viewed It 
and decided that It would never 
succeed because of the frost that 
would form on the rails In the 
winter. 

The President of the United 
States, a local boy named John 
Quincy Adams, visited in August, 
1827, got caught In a thunderstorm 
and took shelter In a shed where 
Wlllard's stone-cutters were 
hacking away at monument granite. 

A group of visitors were riding up 
the Railway's incline In an empty 
car on July 25, 1832, when the chain 
broke and catapulted them over a 
40-foot cliff. One was killed in what 
may have been the first railroad 
fatality in the United States. 

The Granite Railway Co. survived 
until 1870, some 27 years after the 
Bunker Hill Monument was 
finished, when most of its track was 
taken over by the Old Colony 
Railroad, which In turn became a 
division of the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford. 

Today much of the roadbed, over 
which freight moved commercially 
on rails for the first time in 
America, Is burled under the 
macadam of the Southeast Express- 
way. 

The incline of the old Railway 
has been restored and is located 
at the dead end of Mullin Ave. in 
West Quincy. It is open to the 
public year round, 24 hours a 
day. There is no admission 
charge. 



i n^iaii ir-- -^ -■■■tiinti 



• • « 



Moswetuset Hummock 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Qmncy Sun P«g« HA 



'Birthplace Of 
Massachusetts' 



The Indians saw it as a hill 
(wetusct) shaped like an arrowhead 
(mos) so they called it "Moswet- 
uset" and when English tongues 
got through mangling the word it 
came out "Massachusetts," which 
became the name of the bay and 
then the state. 

The little wooded hillock near the 
junction of East Squantum St. and 
Quincy Shore Drive was once the 
seat of the sachem Chickatabot, 
who comes down through the pages 
of Quincy history as a rather 
pathetic figure. 

He was the chief of the Moswet- 
uset Indians, a once great tribe that 
occupied the coast north of Ply- 
mouth. 

A few years before, under the 
great sachem Nanepashemet, the 
Moswetuset had been able to field 
some 3,000 warriors for a war with 
the Nanepashemet was killed. 

Then came the plague. 

In two years the mighty Moswet- 
uset were all but wiped out. No 
more than 60 of them were left to till 
their fields on the banks of the 
Neponset River. Sachem Chicka- 
tabot fled his home on the hill in 
Wollaston and took refuge on 
Moswetuset Hummock. 

That was the situation in 1621 
when Capt. Myles Standish landed 
from a shallop with an exploring 




MOSWETUSET HUMMOCK 

party of Plymouth Pilgrims that 
included the Indian guide Squanto 
(or Tsquantum), whose name was 
given to the peninsula that stuck out 
in the bay. 

The tragic Chickatabot died not 
long after the Pilgrims' visit and he 
was succeeded as sachem by his 
son, Josiah Wampatuck, a boy who 
knew a good deal when he saw one. 

Wampatuck sold what was left of 
his virtually deserted tribal lands to 
a group of whites for 12 pounds, 10 
shillings. The lands included most 
of what is today the city of Quincy 
and the towns of Braintree, 
Randolp h and Holbrook. 

Moswetuset Hummock, 
identified by a marker stone and 
maintained in its natural state, is 
open to the public. There is no 
admission charge. <^ 





TRADITIONAL 
TOURS 

Make History Come Alive 

There are many 
historical sites in Quincy. 

Join us as we visit the 
birthplace. Summer 
White House and burial sites 

of both John Adams and John Quincy Adams. See the place 
where John Hancock was bom; and learn about the city's famous 
granite industry. ICnown for years as the "Granite City," Quincy 
pronounced QUINZEE) is perhaps our nation's best kq)t histori- 
cal secret! 

And now you have the unique opportunity to make 
history come alive! 

Traditional Tours invites you to call today and reserve 
your tour. 

Guests on this narrated tour will get a first-hand view as 
shared by the special, costumed guide on board, 
t Let "Abigail Adams" show you her town! 
if Call today to relive the history of Quincy , Massachusetts. 



TRADITIONAL TOURS 




(617)659-2476 

1-800-479-2476 
FAX (617) 659-9442 



Toor package* flffaring gfOV "<*<>«*** «»^ "S'^^ 
iadqwodoidy. Stq>-an gnkfe aervkx, kM^ing. niMds aad attiactioDS. 



Quincy College 
Public Report 1992-1993 



Since opening its doors in September 1956, QUINCY 
COLLEGE has experienced significant growth and this 
year graduated its largest class ever. More than 6(X) 
students participated in June Commencement Ceremonies 
featuring the Honorable Charies F. Flaherty, Speaker of 
the Massachusetts House, as honorary degree recipient 

Quincy college continues its highly regarded 
nursing program at its Quincy and Plymouth campuses. 
QUINCY COLLEGE recently signed an agreement with 
the Han Dan Medical Center, China; an arrangement 
which would enable QUINCY COLLEGE nursing 
instructors to develop a teaching curriculum and training 
course for the Han Dan Center faculty which meets 
American standards. 

The Edward T. Sullivan Labor-Management Center at 
QUINCY COLLEGE will host its annual Ubor Forum 
enritled "Labor in Transition" and will address the 
changing relationship between labor and management. 
Governor William Weld is scheduled to appear. QUINCY 
COLLEGE in conjunction with The Sullivan Center 
offers Associate Degree and Certificate programs in 
Labor-Management. 

Quincy college serves more than 86 communities, 
and has intemational students from 35 countries. The 
average age of a QUINCY COLLEGE student is 28. Our 
student body is 68 percent female and 32 percent male. 
Minority comprise nearly 21 percent of the student body. 
This past year applications to QUINCY COLLEGE 
increased 29 percent. Total financial aid awarded by the 
college for the 1992-1993 school year exceeded $3.2 
million. 




QUINCY 

College 

34 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 02169 






The South Shore's Communitu College 



Paga 12A Quincy Sun ThuTfday. July 1, 1993 

The Thomas Crane Library 



A Romanesque 
Architectural Beauty 



He came to Quincy as a boy of 7, 
grew to young manhood on a farm in 
Quincy Point, learned the granite- 
cutters' trade, and left at the age of 
26 to win fame and fortune in stone in 
New York City. 

That was the last Quincy saw of 
Thomas Crane for half a century 
until one February day in 1880, five 
years after his death, when his son, 
Albert, appeared with $20,000 with 
which to build a memorial - 
preferably a library -- to his father. 

"My father always retained a 
strong feeling for the town of 
Quincy," was his only explanation. 

Albert Crane himself chose the 
man to design the building, Henry 
Hobson Richardson, grandson of the 
English scientist Dr. Joseph Priestly 
and the foremost architect of the 
day. 

His reputation was so formidable 
that he was able to tell Crane, "I can 
not guarantee that the building, 
when completed, shall conform to 
(your) ideas of beauty and taste," 
and still get the job. 

Richardson's Romanesque 
building, which now houses the 
reference section of the library, was 
dedicated on May 30, 1882, with the 
principal oration delivered by 
Charles Francis Adams, Jr., 
chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

It was Adams who qave the libraru 



its name. Albert Crane wanted it to 
be "The Quincy Free Public 
Library." Adams insisted on "The 
Thomas Crane Public Library." 

"Who's giving the building?" asked 
Albert Crane. 

"You are, but you wouldn't have if 
it hadn't been for me," said Adams, 
who was used to having his way 
around Quincy, and that was that. 

President John Adams' modest 
collection of books was housed in 
the library until 1893, when it was 
discovered that in 1 1 years only two 
persons, one of them Charles 
Francis Adams, Jr., had asked to see 
them. They were then transferred to 
the Boston Public Library. 

At the start, Richardson's 
magnificent building was all but 
hidden behind a grain store, a hotel, 
an office building and four homes 
that lined Washington St. 

Albert Crane, however, was a 
persistent man and, by the time he 
died in 1917, he had purchased and 
torn down all the buildings, leaving a 
broad expanse of open space to 
enhance the library. 

But before the lawn could be 
seeded. World War 1 intervened and, 
in a burst of patriotism - "Food will 
win the war," they said - the area 
was planted with potatoes, tended 
by an expert brought in from Maine. 
The experiment failed. 




There are so many options for today's busy families-places to go and things to do. The 
YMCA is your one-stop family place with activities for everyone of every age, size, 
shape and ability. So if you're looking for that one healthy, wholesome and fun place, 
then join the YMCA family. «rT 

South Shore YMCA Y 



79 Coddington Street, Quincy, MA 



479-8500 




THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



"There wasn't a potato in the lot 
that was anywhere near as large as a 
golf bail," said Mayor Joseph L. 
Whiton. The harvest was donated to 
the poor farm. 

Albert Crane also put up $64,000 
to build the Spear St. wing of the 
library in 1907-08 and the Crane 
family gave yet another $164,000 for 
the free standing addition, built in 



1936, that now houses the stacks 
and the children's section. 

The Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington St., is 
open to the public, free of charge, 
Monday to Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. It is closed on Saturdays 
during June, July and August. 



Wefcome to Historic Quincy 

AGNITTI 

Insurance Agency 
• Home • Auto • Business • Life 

770^0123 

AGNITTI 

Property Management 
Rentals • Sales • Management 

773-^5300 




Anthony Agnitti 



21 Franklin Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 



Dorothy; Quinc}^ Homestead 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Qtdncy Sun Page 13A 



John Hancock's Declaration Of Love 



An aura of romance surrounds 
the stately old house that is set back 
in the trees from the corner of 
Hancock St. and Butler Rd., on the 
banks of Furnace Brook. 

There is the wallpaper with its 
blue cupids and pink flowers that 
was imported from France for the 
wedding of Dorothy Quincy, the 
vivacious daughter of the house, to 
Quincy-born John Hancock, a 
patriot on the run with a price on his 
head. 

There are the words "You I Love 
and You alone," addressed by 
Hancock to his beloved Dorothy and 
scratched on a window pane with 
his diamond ring just before he fled 
to Lexington on the eve of the 
Revolution. 

And there are the secret 
chambers and passageways, used, 
it was said, to hide fugitive patriots 
during the Revolution and, at an 
earlier date, even certain English- 
men fleeing a charge of regicide in 
the death of King Charles L 

Parts of the house were built in 
1685 by Col. Edmund Quincy, the 
second of the name, on land that 
was granted to an earlier Edmund 
in 1638. The major part was built in 
1706 by Edmund the third. (There 
were six Edmunds in all, four in a 
direct line; two nephews.) 

The house was the social center of 
old Braintree during the regime of 



the fourth Edmund, largely because 
he sired five beautiful daughters 
around whom swirled a whole 
future generation of judges, gen- 
erals and merchant kings. 

The undisputed belle of the 
household was Dorothy, the 
coquettish youngest of the eight 
Quincy children, whose troth was 
soon plighted to John Hancock, the 
wealthy young businessman from 
Boston who was already becoming 
known as a leader of the rebels. 

Tradition has it that they were to 
have been married in the north 
parlor of the Quincy homestead 
with its French cupid wallpaper 
when Revolution intervened and 
John had to flee with the British on 
his heels. 

Eventually, they were wed Aug. 
28, 1775, at the home of Thaddeus 
Burr, uncle of Aaron Burr (later vice 
president of the United States) in 
Fairfield, Conn. 

After the Revolution and the 
death of Edmund the fourth in 1788 
the old house passed from the 
Quincy family. The Hancocks 
wanted nothing to do with it. Their 
only son, John George Washington 
Hancock, was killed in a skating 
accident at age 9 while on a visit in 
1787. 

The house was acquired in 1904 
by the Massachusetts Society of 
Colonial Dames, who restored it 




H 



k\ •Jl^' Colonial 
;m Federal 



INSURED FDiC 



serving the 
Quincy Community for 104 years 

Welcomes You To 
Historic Quincy 



COLONIAL FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK 

QUIICV 15 Beach Street 617-471-0750 

EAST WEYRMMJTH Corner of Middle & Washington Streets 617-331-1776 

HOLBROOK 802 South Franklin Street 61 7-767- 1 776 ^/^ 





DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



with vintage furniture, utensils and 
clothing, and gave it to the state 
with the proviso that the Dames 
continue to run it. 

The Dorothy Quincy Home- 
stead is open to the public May 
through October, Wednesday 



through Sunday, from noon to 5 
p.m. (last tour at 4 p.m. It is also 
open by appointment only 
Wednesday through Sunday 
from 10 a.m. to noon for groups. 

Admission is $3.00 for adults 
and $1.00 for children age 12 
and under. 




• Fine Dining 
• Lounge 
• Function Facilities 

Picturesque view for... 

Business Lunches 
Romantic Dinners 
Private Functions 



Located across from the Nonh Qujnc> ..^ 

MBTA Sution in the State Street South ofTict 
complex (ofTNewport Ave.) Function facilities Available. 



For Reservations Call 
328-1600 



Pag« 14A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



Let Us Show You The 



HIGHLIGHTS 



I. Town Hall: City Hall of Quincy - Architect and 
builder, Solomon Wiliard. Completed November 
1, 1844. Built of Quincy granite. 

2« Adams Academy - Site of the birthplace of John 
Hancock, the Patriot. Erected in 1871. Now the 
home of The Quincy Historical Society. World 
War I statue and memorial. Bust of Hancock. 
Historical exhibit. 

3. Adams National Historic Site - Built in 1731 by 
Major Leonard Vassal. Purchased by President 
John Adams in 1787, and occupied by four 
generations of the Adams Family. 

4. Dorothy Quincy Homestead - Dating from 
1685, it was the home of four generations of the 
Edmund Quincy family. Home of Dorothy Quincy 
who married John Hancock. 

5. Woodward School ■ Founded by Dr. Ebenezer 
Woodward in 1869 to educate Quincyborn girls. 

^. Milestone Marker ■ The Neponset Turnpike 
(now Hancock Street) gave people a shorter 
route to Boston. This milestone (almost illegal) 
marks 7'^ miles from Boston. An older milstone 
across the way, on Adams Academy grounds, 
marks the miles on the old route via Milton. 

7. Quincy Junior College - Formerly the 
Coddington School built in 1909, then a "modern" 
elementary school. 

S. Bethany Church ■ Built in 1928 in Gothic style, 
its gargoyles, four feet long, are the longest in 
New England. 

9. Thomas Crane Public Library - Designed by 
Henry Jobson Richardson, foremost architect of 
his era. Commissioned in 1880 by Albert Crane in 
memory of his father. 

10. United First Parish Church A fine example of 
the Greek Revival period designed by Alexander 
Parrish and constructed in 1828. John Adams and 
his wife, Abigail, and John Quincy Adams and his 
wife Louisa Catherine are buried in the church. 

II. Hancock Cemetery ■ Dated around 1640 and 
named for the Reverend John Hancock, father of 
the Patriot. The oldest headstone is dated 1666. 

12. Post Office. 

13. Christ Church -Oldest Episcopal parish in the 
state. 

14. St. John the Baptist Church - Roman Catholic. 

15. Christ Church Cemetery. 

16. Birthplaces of John Adams and John Quincy 
Adams - The nation's only father and son 
presidents. The two saltbox farmhouses, 
undergoing restoration by the National Park 
Service are a brief walk down Franklin Street. 



The Quincy Cent^ 









^Vr 



G//V 



PARKWAY 



EXTENSION 



^^ 



$^. 



^, 



Vb^ 



SgSoWAY 



15 



e'^ 



>^ 



co 



cv^ 



J 



h^ 



^ti^ 



^ 



a 



Xi\^ 



c^ 



^s 



c^ 



.^ 



Q Quincy S 

1200 Hancock Street, Quincy (Main Office 
371 Hancock Street, North Quince 

(617 



Mem 



Way . . . 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Qinncy Sun Page ISA 



Br Walking Tou 









ft? 

GO 



tO^ 



V. 



^: 



3^35; 



G^t 



^p 






•• 



^. 



V 



^> 



11 



start. 



• •• 



^^ 






cVt 



s'^? 



til?^ 



o 



finish 



6 



^. 



^ 



^: 



Jr. 



ti^ 



^•^ 



.^A 



'^ 



^^ 



'^^ 






^1 



^- 



>. 



'^. 



'^ 



CO 



tJ> 









^r."^ 



«?y 



O 



,^/ 



\ 



avings Bank 



138 Franklin Street, South Quincy 
7 461 Washington Street, Quincy Point 
) 471-3500 



ber FDIC/DIF 



Page 16A Qinncv Sun Thuvaday. July 1, 1993 




PAINTING BY Albert Herter shows John Adams, Samuel Constitution in the law office of John Quincy Adams 
Adams and James Bowdoin at work on the Massachusetts Birthplace, Franklin St., Quincy. 

(Photo courtesy of The Quincy Historical Society) 



John Adams 'Father' 



U.S., State Constitution Both Born Here 



Quincy, birthplace of John 
Adams, John Quincy Adams <ind 
John Hancock, also has claim to 
the birth of the U.S. 
Constitution. 

The seed for this precious 
document was planted here. 

The U.S. Constitution was 
modeled after the Massachusetts 
Constitution which was written by 
John Adams, Samuel Adams and 
James Bowdoin in the law office of 
the John Quincy Adams birthplace 
in Quincy. 

There is every reason to believe 
that John Adams did not want to go 
to the Massachusetts Constitution 
Convention in Cambridge in 1779. 

He had arrived home only seven 
days before on the French frigate La 
Sensible after nearly 18 months in 
Paris helping to negotiate a 
commercial and military alliance 
with France. He was in such a rush 
to get home that he apparently 
landed the day before La Sensible 
reached Boston by rowing ashore 
from Nantasket Roads. 

He missed his wife, Abigail, 
terribly, and she him. 

"One was angry, another was full 
of Greif, and the third with Mel- 
ancholy, so that I burnt them all," 
he wrote to her from Passy on Dec. 
18, 1778, listing his complaints with 
her most recent letters. "If you 
write me in ths style I shall leave of 
writing intirely, it kills me. 



"Am 1 not wretched Enough, in 
this Banishment, without this? 
What Course shall I take to convince 
you that my Heart is warm? I beg 
you would never more write to me in 
such a strain for it really makes me 
unhappy." 

"How lonely are my days?" she 
wrote on a Sunday evening, Dec. 
27, "How solitary are my Nights? 
How insupportable the Idea that 
3000 lelgues, and the vast ocean 
now devide us -- but devide only our 
persons for the Heart of my Friend 
is in the Bosom of his partner." 

Somewhere on the vast ocean the 
two letters passed each other. 

Paris and the dissolute court of 
Louis XVI held small appeal to the 
Puritan in John Adams, even when 
his closest everyday companions 
were Dr. Benjamin Franklin, still 
with an eye for the ladies at age 73, 
and the swashbuckling Capt. John 
Paul Jones, half patriot, half pirate, 
who had just taken command of the 
leaky old East Indiaman he had 
renamed Bon Homme Richard. 

The American colonies, newly 
reborn as the United States of 
America, were going through the 
most dismal period of the War for 
Independence. Inflation was 
rampant: butcher's meat, a dollar to 
eight shillings a pound; flour, fifty 
dollars a hundredweight. The news 
from the fighting front was of 
defeat, privation and horror. 
Like many Braintree wives whose 



husbands were away at war, Abigail 
Adams was forced into the unac- 
customed role of head of the 
household, a function she filled with 
determination. 

"I cannot avoid sometimes 
repining that the gifts of fortune 
were not bestowed upon us, that I 
might have enjoyed the happiness 
of spending my days with my 
partner," she wrote, "but as it is, 1 
think it my duty to attend with 
frugality and economy to our own 
private affairs; and if 1 cannot add to 
our little substance, yet see to it that 
it is not diminished." 

She abstained from drinking 
black market tea, allowing herself 
one tiny complaint: "I should like a 
little green (tea), but they say there 
is none to be had here. I only wish it 
for a medicine, as a relief to a 
nervous pain in my head to which I 
am sometimes subject." 

John Adams attended the 
opening session of the Constitu- 
tional Convention in Cambridge on 
Wednesday, Sept. 1, 1779. On 
Saturday, he was named to a 
committee of 30 to prepare the 
declaration of rights and the 
constitution. On Monday, the 
committee delegated the task to a 
subcommittee of three, John and 
Samuel Adams; and James Bow- 
doin. 

Thus it was that John Adams 
wound up in the law office of his 
home at the foot of Penn's Hill, 



paired with his firebrand cousin, 
Sam, and his ailing friend, James 
Bowdoin, to write a Constitution for 
the state of Massachusetts, which in 
turn became the model for the 
Constitution of the United States. 

The patient, hard-working John 
Adams, of course, did most of the 
work. 

"1 was by the Convention put 
upon the Committee -- by the 
Committee upon the subcommittee 
-- and by the subcommittee 
appointed a sub subcommittee -- 
so that I had the honor to be 
principal Engineer, ' ' he wrote to his 
friend, Edmund Jennings. Payroll 
records indicate that he was paid 90 
pounds for his work. 

The so-called "Adams draft" of 
the Massachusetts Constitution was 
accepted by the Convention with a 
few alterations but by that time 
John Adams was long gone back to 
Europe, this time to help negotiate 
a treaty of peace with Britain and 
serve as America's first minister 
to London. He did not see the farm 
at the foot of Penn's Hill again for 
another eight years. 

But he was immensely heartened 
by these words from the pen of his 
ever-loving Abigail, written on Oct 
15, 1780: 

"Our Massachusetts Constitution 
is read with admiration in New York 
and pronounced by the Royal 
Governor as the best republican 
form he ever saw." 



ThundiV.July 1,1993 QinncySun P«9« 17A 




WRITING TABLE in old law office is spot where John Adams labored over 
his law cases in the John Quincy Adams Birthplace. 



It Was Richard 



For years, the first name of Capt. 
Wollaston, the leader of the original 
settlers of Quincy in 1625, was lost to 
history. 

Only recently did the researches 



of H. Hobart Holly, historian of the 
Quincy Historical Society, turn up 

the information that it probably was 
Richard. 



ONE 



GAS 



STOP 



Our Full - Serve Gas Station has five blends of gasoline 

available for your automotive needs. 

We are going back to the basics, remember the good old 
days of service at the pumps. 

Well, they're back at the one-stop-gas station. We will 
wash your windows, check your oil and check your tire 
pressure. 

Our attendants will greet and service you with a smile at 
the One-Stop-Gas Station. 



Professional, knowlegeable certified technicians 

We do the Job right the first time! 





automotive 



(61 7) 786-9080 (61 7) 472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 



"im mm Am wmm ammms** 



V ;. 



Fully Authorized Car Care Center 

WE DO IT ALL! 




RESTAURANT 




Lunch & Dinner • 7 Days 

Daili; Lunch Specials from $2.95 

Early Bird Special 

w/ soup or salad along with coffee 

& dessert only $6.45 

3-6 PM 

Dinner Specials from $5.95 
• Lobster Specials everyday 

• Variety of seafood specials daily 
• King Cut Prime Rib (of course) everyday 
Perfect Setting for family gatherings 

Gift Certificates Available 

Call for directions 
617-472-1900 

Located off of Washington St. 
62 Sumner Street 

Quincy, MA, 02169 

You won^t be dissappointed! 







P«9C ISA Qidncy Sun ThuTMlay, July 1. 1993 




DOMED CEILING of the United First Parish Church, cut with classic Greek 
lines, emphasizes the size and beauty of the churdi. The dome and the crypt 
of Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams and their wives combine 
to make the "Church of Presidents" one of most awe inspiring sights in 
Quincy. 



A Third Generation 
Continues Our Traditions. 

Quincy has changed a great deal since Sweeney Funeral Home was 
established in 1917. But, it's nice to know some things will never change. 
Like the observance of traditional values and customs. 

At Sweeney Funeral Homes, older residents are quick to notice the 
subtle reminders of yesteryear, such as the grey gloves our funeral 
director still wears. Like the characteristic top hat and tails that our 
founder, Dennis Sweeney, wore over 30 years ago, they reflect our 
Tradition. One that has been built on a dignified and instinctive concern 
for the city's bereaved families for three generations. 

Today, our founder's grand-nephew, Dennis S. Sweeney has 
continued the family's philosophy of maintaining a beautiful, home-like 
atmosphere. 

And like his namesake, who started pre-arrangements in the 1940s, 
Dennis believes in helping residents to plan for the future. Pre-planning 
means that this financial decision is not left for a family to decide while 
they are attempting to cope with a major personal loss. It's a difficult 
time, a time when family members are least able to make the wisest 
choice. 

Sweeney FYineral Homes has been helping South Shore residents 
with difficult decisions for over 70 years. Call Dennis Sweeney at 
(617) 773-2728 for ifree consultation. There's no time like the present. 



^!t« 



SWEENEY FUNERAL HOMES § 

Quinty shiM liirThrcc Cjcivnilions 
74 Elm Siretl • 326 C.)peland Street • 6l7.77.v:72« 



guinrv Sqiiarv. IttW 








HANCOCK CEMETERY in Quincy Square is the resting place of the early settlers 
including Rev. John Hancock, a minister of the First Parish Church and father of 
patriot John Hancock. 



Quincy Quiz 



What was the role in Quincy's 
history of "Thomas Morton of 
Clifford's Inn, Gent.?" 
Answer: 

'suo SuiAjjeo 
ypns 0} pua ue ^nd uo^sog 
p sueiun^] aq) puc q^noiu/^i^] 
)o suiuS|!cj aqt |!;un sueipu] 
aq; mim pa^JOAeo pue a|od/^euj 
e papaja ';uno)^ liiiBy^ o; aiueu 
aq; paSueqo 'iZ9l "! fuaiuamas 
uojsB||o/y\ jj^ aqj jo |oj)uo3 >foo} 
,;a|njs!j^ p pio-]„ aq; jpsuiiq 
Buiqqnp 'uo^JO)^ seuioqx 



What was the role in Quincy's 
history of Francis L. Souther? 

Answer: 

•aB/Y\ (lAiQ aq; ui ^equioo uj 
aip o) ja<p|os uoiuf) ;sjy aq; 'X98i 
'Ot aunf uo laqjag Big p a^cg 
aqj je pail!>I sb/y\ oqm 'luauiiBay 

s^asnqDBSsej^ q^-inoj 'spacnQ 
jqBn >|DODUBH 3M^ JO jequiaui 
B SB/v\ jaqjnos -j spuBJj 







DOHERTY & WHITE 

Insurance Agency 
and 

FRANCESCO LaROSA 

Insurance Agency 

353 So. Artery Box 511 
Quincy 02269-0511 

773-4700 

Associated with 

Bernard J. Tobin 

435 Washington Street 
Quincy, MA 02269 

The insurance that you cany Is just as Important to your security and 
peace of mind as your bark account. When buying or renewing 
insurance, you should contact a professional who will treat you with 
individual, personalized service, and find the best plan for you, your 
family, orbusiness. These professionals are to be found at DOHERTY 
& WHITE INSURANCE. 

•Auto •Homeowners 

•Life •Health 

• Business & Commercial • 




ThundiV^July 1. 1993 QuincySua P«a« 19A 



John Quinci; Adams: 

The Old Flame 
Still Burned 



The old man's bitterness 
glowed from every word as he 
penned them in his diary on June 
17, 1843, the day the Bunker Hill 
Monument was dedicated. 

"What a name in the annals of 
mankind is Bunker Hill! What a 
day was the 17th of June, 1775! 
And what a burlesque upon them 
both is an oration upon them by 
Daniel Webster!" 

The old man despised Webster 
as a turncoat to his own heritage, 
one whose compromises had sold 
out to slavery. 

"The ideal associations of the 
thundering cannon, which I heard, 
and the smoke of burning 
Chariest own, which I saw, on 
that awful day . . How could I 
have witnessed all this at once, 
without an unbecoming burst oif 
indignation. 

"Daniel Webster is a heartless 





A MARKET PLACE nourished on the grounds of Adams Academy in the early 
1900's. The Academy, now the home of the Quincy Historical Society was then 
headquarters for the Boy Scouts. 



traitor to the cause of ft'eedom; 
John Tyler (the President] is a 
slave-monger. What have these 
to do with the Quincy granite 
pyramid on the brow of Bunker 
HiD? 

"I stayed home . . " 

The old flame still burned in 
John Quincy Adams at 75. 



Quincy Historical Facts 



1792: The North Precinct 
separated from Old Braintree and 
named Quincy in honor of Colonel 
John Quincy. Population about 
900. 

• 

1797: John Adams elected 
second President of the United 
States. 



1824: John Quincy Adams 
elected sixth President of the 
United States. 

•k 

1826: First Commercial 
Railroad opened to transport 
granite for Bunker Hill Monument, 
from West Quincy to the 
Neponsct River. 




BEAUTIFUL VIEW of Boston's skyline is from Squaw Rock area of Squantum. At 
right is the Myles Standish Cairn erected in 1895 to commemorate his visit here 
Sept. 30, 1621 — the first recorded visit of white men to this k>cality. He was gukled 
across the bay by Tisquantum or Squanto who became the early settlers' friend 
and benefactor. Squantum was named after him. 



1 




South Shore Buick 

Is Celebrating It*s 90th Anniversary 

with Special Edition Regal and LaSabre 




ANNIIVBnSARV 




THIS WAS South Shore Buick in 1927 when located on Hancock Street in Quincy Center. 



50 Adams Street, Quincy 



770-3300 



P«9« 20A Quincy Sun Thunday. July 1, 1993 



Josiah Quinci; Homestead 

Lookout For Spying On British Ships 



Abigail Adams stood with her 
great uncle, Col. Josiah Quincy, in a 
window of his mansion overlooking 
Wollaston Beach and watched the 
tali masts of 170 ships stand slowly 
out to sea. It was March 17, 1776. 
The British were evacuating Boston. 

But even in triumph there was 
tragedy. 

Aboard the departing ships were 
more than 1,000 Loyalists, 
Americans who had chosen King 
above country, and one of them was 
Abigail's cousin, Samuel Quincy, the 
Colonel's only remeiining son, an 
avowed Tory. 

"I take a long farewell," his sister, 
Hannah, wrote to him for one last 
time. "Let it not be published that a 
brother of such brothers fled from 
his country. Can you expect to wedk 
uprightly now? Can you take fire in 
your besom and not be burned?" 

Two of Col. Josiah Quincy's sons 
had died young. Now he had no 
more. 

But there was no time for regrets. 
The work of revolution had begun. 
The second ftoor of the house at 
what is now 20 Muirhead St., 
Wollaston, was a lookout from which 
the 66-year-old Colonel spied on 
British ship movements for his 
friend, Gen. George Washington. 

A few nrK}nths before, Col. Quincy 
watched the Royal Governor, Gen. 
Thomas Gage depart and he 
scratched on a pane of window glass 
the reminder: "Oct. 10, 1775, 



General Gage sailed for England 
with a fair wind." 

This time he remained in the 
window for three days as the British 
tall ships moved restlessly about the 
Harbor as if reluctant to leave. 
Finally, on March 20, the last of them 
passed through the roadstead and 
out to sea. 

The mansion in Wollaston 
reached full social flower under the 
aegis of the Colonel's grandson, the 
third Josiah, the "Great Mayor" of 
Boston, president of Harvard and 
Congressman, who called it 
"Tranquillia" and used it as his 
summer home. 

It was there that the Marquis de 
Lafayette visited one Sunday after- 
noon after dinner with his friend, 
exPresident John Adams at the 
Adams Mansion. He carried flowers 
from the Adams garden for Mrs. 
Eliza Susan Quincy and her five 
attractive daughters. 

The house was built in 1770 by the 
old Colonel himself, the first in a line 
of six Josiahs. It was said that, while 
most families passed their line from 
sire to son, the Quincys went from 
'Siah to 'Siah. 

But, while there were six Josiahs 
and innumerable Edmunds, the city 
was named for yet another member 
of the prolific family - Col. John 
Quincy, the great grandfather of 
John Quincy Adams sixth president 
of the United States. 






Wl It'll Josiali Quincy IV built a liousc* ' 4-;,-^ 

oi' Ills laniily ic considered location, 'V^y 

beauty, and coniniunity, and tlien lie ', ' : ". 
Ill . ' ' "', -O" 

pick'ed the best spot ui to'vv'n... , l,' ^ «»* ^^ 



■'■<> ,. ' 



V .• 4 



* ^ ^^^ 



/^^</v ?. 






,.^^^ /T ^».:«» ' 



' Y i TuUiy u\' tdli tluil siTot ' *•',/ "''•' 

' ■ Eastern Nazarene College' 

:\'(;H<I to be a pcu't oi Quincvs lici'ilcujc .since 11)19. 
iNC (liter's a liberal arts education in 32 majors. 



(ir innx\ iMl('iruuiti/-'n on 



(l( (jr'c'c I r.fn pit ti4 iH 



'r([r-(i(lu<:i1( , (jfcuhuitc (itul 
11 tlu' ?\(Jmiksu)H.s oH'ui' tit 




JOSIAH QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



The Josiah Quincy 
Homestead is open to the 

public from June 1 to Oct. 
31 Tuesday, Thursday, 
Saturday and Sunday from 



noon to 5 pan. Visits may be 
made at other times by 
appointment. Admission is 
$4 for adults, $3.50 for 
senior citizens and $2 for 
diidren age 12 and under. 



How Many Miles From Boston? 



Stone mile markers across 
Hancocl< Street from each other 
indicate that the traveler is both 7'/4 
and 10 miles from Boston. And both 
are correct. 

The 10-miles marker was placed 
on the Old Coast Road, one of the 
oWest highways in the United States 
still in existence, which went from 



Boston to Plymouth in 1639 by way 
of inland Milton. 

The 7 14-mile marker was raised 
after the first bridge over the 
Neponset River was built in 1803, 
creating the Neponset Turnpike, 
which is today Hancock St. in North 
Quincy and Wollaston. 



Compliments of 



SWEENEY BROTHERS 




RICHARD T. SWEENEY, Jr7 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

472-6344 



^ -v -% •- <* • 



Abigail Adams Cairn 

The Smoke Could Be 
Seen Over Bunker Hill 



Thuraday, Julu 1. 1993 Qinncy Sun Page 21A 



Abigail Adams was awakened at 
dawn in the farmhouse at the foot of 
Penn's Hill by the sound of farujff 
guns. All through the sweltering 
morning of June 17, 1775, as she 
hustled about with the chores, the 
dull boom of cannon intruded on her 
' consciousness. 

Riders on the Coast Road to 
Plymouth, stopping at the farm- 
house for a drink of water, told her of 
a great battle underway on Breed's 
Hill in Chariest own. 

One of them brought word that 
Dr. Joseph Warren had been killed 
in the fighting and little Abby, age 10, 
burst into tears , and John Quincy, 
nearly 8, felt bewildered and sad, for 
Dr. Warren was the Adams family 
doctor in Boston. 

In the afternoon, Abigail could 
stand it no longer. Taking Abby and 
John Quincy by the hand, she 
walked up the Coast Road to the top 
of Penn's Hill and climbed up on the 
rocks for a better view. 

The panorama of the Bay, a 
shimmering blue in the sunshine, 
spread out before them, the tiny 
houses on the three hills of Boston 
and, beyond, the black smoke rising 
in billows. 

"Good God," exclaimed Abigail, 
"they are burning Charlestown!" 

The scene etched itself forever in 
John Quincy's memory. 



The early days of the Revolution 
were times of turmoil in Old 
Braintree and its North Precinct, 
which was later called Quincy. 

Abigail's husband, John, was away 
most of the time at the Continental 
Congress in Philadelphia, leaving 31- 
year old Abigail to manage the farm 
and look to the needs of four small 
children, Abigail, John Quincy, 
Charles, 5, and Thomas Boylston, 3. 

There were days of alarm as the 
British, penned up in Boston by the 
brand new Continental Army, 
foraged up and down the coast for 
supplies. Refugees from occupied 
Boston and the inner towns of 
Dorchester and Roxbury sometimes 
slept in the kitchen and in the fields. 

As the wife of a member of 
Congress, Abigail was a center of 
attention. The house on the Coast 
Road was a favorite stopping place 
for travelers to Plymouth. Politicians 
up from Philadelphia made it a point 
to stop by for a visit with John 
Adams' wife. 

Abigail was invited to visit Gen. 
George Washington's headquarters 
at Winter Hill. The aristocratic 
Washington was suspect among 
New Englanders. He was a Virginian; 
he was an Anglican; and, it was said, 
he held slcives. But John Adams liked 
him and Abigail was soon charmed. 




Continental 
Cablevision 



serving the 

communities of 

Quincy, Milton, Randolpli 

"We put everything 
on the line for you" 

81 Sclnool St., Quincy 




f 



ABIGAIL ADAMS CAIRN 



One day, young John Quincy 
came home to find his Uncle Elihu 
melting down Abigail's pewter 
spoons in the kitchen to make bullet 
molds. He looked at his mother and 
she looked back at him and 
something indefinable passed 
between them. 

"Do you wonder," wrote the sixth 
president of the United States some 
68 years later, "that a boy of 7 who 



witnessed this scene should be a 
patriot." 

In 18%, where the old Coast 
Road (now Franklin St.) meets 
Viden Rd. atop Penn's Hill a 
stone cairn was built to msu'k the 
spot where Abigail and young 
John Quincy watched the Battle 
of Bunker Hill. It is open to the 
public free of charge. 




Church of 
dohn the 
Baptist 

44 School St. 
Quincy 

PASTOR 
Rev. William R. McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 
Rev. Francis M. Gonroy 
Rev. Richard 8. Moran 

Rev. Peter F. Quinn 
Rev. Theodore L Fortier 

(Quincy Hospital Chaplain in Residence) 



Mass Schedule 

Saturday: 4:00 & 7:00 PM 

Sunday: 7:00 AM 

9:00 AM 

11:00 AM 

12:30 PM 

5:30 PM 

Weekdays: 8:00 A.M. and 5:30 P.M. 

Confessions in Cliapel 
Saturday 3-3:45 P.M. 

(Rectory - 21 Gay St., 773-1021) 



Pans 22A Quincy Sun Thunday, July 1, 1993 






Budget cut ^i v.._*'»* H,srori. 






Sii.Mi Hinioval Tub Hinhril In 15 T/rars 

Storm Price Ta gSecn $100,000 

Wk I liii^i^W 

THE QUINCY SUN 

TODAY IS 

QUINCY'S HISTORY 

TOMORROW 

We Are Proud To 

Be Part Of It 

And To Record 

It For Posterity. 

Keeping It Accurate 

Is Important To Us 

And To You. 

We're Celebrating Our 

25th Anniversary 

As Quincy 's Own Newspaper 







1372 Hancock Street 
Quincy Square 

471-3100 




First Iron Works 



Steel Industry Born 
Here In 1644 



It failed after nine years of 
effort and, since failure was 
anathema in a growing America, 
perhaps that is why the site and 
even the memory of the first 
commercial iron blast furnace in 
the United States was lost for so 
long. 

It flourished, if that is the word, 
from 1644 to 1653 on the banks 
of the Mount Wollaston River in a 
section of Old Braintree called, 
"the Woods." It left its name on 
the river, now Furnace Brook in 
West Quincy. 

Iron was an important 
commodity in Colonial 
Massachusetts, particularly for 
nails and pots and pans. 
Unfortunately, iron utensils had 
to be imported from England, a 
costly process for the penny-wise 
colonists. 

With this in mind, John 
Winthrop Jr., son of the governor 
of the Massachusetts Bay colony 
[Did someone cry "Nepotism?"), 
went to London and formed the 
"Company of Undertakers for the 
Ironworks in New England." He, 
of course, was the local agent. 

The Company gave Winthrop a 
thousand pounds of capital and a 
work crew of indentured servants, 
many of whom ran away when 
they heard they were going to 
the wilds of America. Jail was 
better than that! 

When, aft<>r a search from 
Maine to Plymouth, he decided to 
locate in Quincy, Winthrop was 
also granted 3,000 acres of land, 
with subsidiary land rights 
elsewhere in the colony, and a 21- 
year monopoly. 

The operation was deemed of 
such importance that the iron 
workers were given exemption 
from militia duty, this at a time 
when war was imminent with the 



Narragansett Indians and with 
Ninigret, sachem of the Niantics. 

The first iron was turned out in 
1644, but young Winthrop was 
fired the next year, to be 
succeeded by Richard Leader. It is 
interesting to note that one of 
America's earliest magnates toiled 
for a salary of 100 pounds a year. 

The ore from which iron was 
blasted on the banks of Furnace 
Brook came from the swamps arxl 
bogs. It was not a high quality 
product. Water power from a 
dram thrown across the Brook 
was inadequate. Quincy iron 
proved to be more expensive than 
the imported kirxl. 

The Company of Undertakers 
appealed for fresh money in 1646 
and apparently there were enough 
investors ready to send good 
money after bad because the 
furnace was still in operation in 
1650 when the Scotch Prisoners 
arrived. 

The Scots were rugged 
Highlanders, soldiers in the army 
of the future King Charies II who 
were captured by Oliver Cromwell 
in the Battle of Dunbar. They 
suffered the fate common to most 
17th Century prisoners of war. 

Cromwell shipped 272 of them 
to New England, cheap labor in an 
effort to make Quincy iron works 
a paying proposition. It didn't 
work. The Company of 

Undertakers went bankrupt in 
1653 and "the Woods" went back 
to the bear and the deer. 

Meanwhile, with the same 
Richard Leader as agent, 
construction began on a second 
iron works on the North Shore in 
Saugus in 1646. When it was 
completed in 1650 it was 
recognized as the firet integrated 
iron industry in America. 



■■ 



Adams Academ}^ 

On Site Of 

John Hancock's 

Birthplace 



Thuraday, July 1, 1993 Qidncy $un P«s« 2$A 



By modern standards, the 
boarding house at the corner of 
Hancock and Depot Sts. had all the 
aspects of a genteel prison. 

Residents were forbidden to leave 
between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. They 
could not enter or leave at any time 
except by the hall door. They were 
banned from pool halls and bars. 
Smoking materials also were 
forbidden to them. 

In exchange for good behavior, , 
plus tuition ranging from $75 to 
$150 a year, they were given the 
best prep school education of the 
day for they were students at 
Adams Academy, which flourished 
from 1872 to 1907 in Quincy. 

The academy was a gift of John 
Adams, the second President of the 
United States, who always had his 
checkbook ready to fill the spiritual 
and educational needs of the 
citizens of his beloved Quincy. 

The trust fund, nourished by 
"rents, profits and emoluments" 
from certain Adams-owned 
properties, was set up in the Adams 
will of 1822, but it was not until 1869 
that the fund was deemed large 
enough to start construction. 

The location was specified by 
Adams himself as the corner of 



Adams and Hancock Sts. , site of the 
birthplace of his childhood friend, 
John Hancock, the first signer of the 
Delcaration of Independence. 

The doors opened to the first 
students, 24 of them, on Sept. 4, 
1872. Five years later, the academy 
reached a peak enrollment of 154 
with an international student body 
---25 from Quincy, four from 
Washington, D.C., 125 and 14 
states, two from England and one 
from Chile. 

It had one of the earliest prep 
school football teams, too, record- 
ing a tie with the Resolutes of 
Boston on Oct. 21, 1876, a scant 
seven years after Princeton and 
Rutgers played the first college 
game. It whipped Andover three 
times from 1877-79. 

The admissions catalogue 
specified that applicants be "well 
prepared in the usual studies of 
good grammar schools" and 
warned that "no pupils are desired 
to give them a collegiate educa- 
tion." 

The best known headmaster was 
Dr. William Everett, once ac- 
claimed as one of the seven smart- 
est men in the world. He ran the 
academy with a firm hand from 1878 



J 



To Be Part Of 
Quincy's Proud History 
Is A Proud Honor 



\- 




Quincy Lodge No. 1295 
Order Sons Of Italy In America 





ADAMS ACADEMY, now home of the Quincy Historical Society. 

the Adams Academy officially 
closed it doors. 



to 1893 and again from 1897 to 1907. 
From 1893 to 1897, he was a U.S. 
congressman from Lynn. 

Dr. Leverett, an aimiable if some- 
times waspish eccentric, was widely 
known as the man who hated 
Abraham Lincoln. He had reason. 
His father was Edward Everett, 
whose masterful oration at Gettys- 
burg was over-shadowed by Lin- 
coln's notes scribbled on the back of 
an envelope. 

It was Dr. Everett who signaled 
the passing of Adams Academy - 
and many other 19th Century 
classical prep schools — at gradu- 
ation exercises in 1907 when he said 
that "unless someone comes for- 
ward and planks down $50,000, 
the academy will be closed." 

Nobody did and on June 22, 1907, 



The building today is 
occupied by the Quincy 
Historical Society, which 
maintains a museum and 
research library in the old 
classrooms as well as an 
eiqianded ^ft shop. 

The museum and gift shop 
are open all year, Monday 
throu^ Friday from 9:30 a.m. 
to 4 p.m., and Saturday from 
1 to 4 p.m. The Ubrary is open 
Monday and Wednesday from 
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m, 
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. or 
by appointment. It is closed 
Sunday and holidays. There is 
a $1 fee for non-members; 
children age 12 and under are 
admitted free. 



120 Quarry St., Quincy 




Page 24A Quincy Sun Thuraday, July 1, 1993 



Constitution Common 




CONSTITUTION COMMON links old City Hall buUt of famed Quincy 
granite in 1844 and the new glass wing dedicated in 1979. At left is the 
"Church of The Presidents" where Presidents John Adams and John Quincy 



Adams and their wives are entombed. Old City Hall was designed by Solomon 
Willard who was also the architect for the Bunker Hill Monument in 
Charlestown. 



PROFILE OF A CITY 

QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 



The City Of Presidents 
1625-1992 



>A, 



1625 
1640 
1735 
1737 



QUINCY - YESTERDAY 

1614 -Explored by Captain John Smith 
1621 - Visited by Captain Myles Standish 

Settled by Captain WoUaston 

Mt. Wollaston was incorporated as the Town of Braintree 

Birth of John Adams 

Birth of John Hancock J 

1767 - Birth of John Quincy Adams 

1779 - John Adams drafts the constitution of Massachusetts in Quincy 
1792 - The North Prcdnct of Old Braintree and part of Dorchester 
becOTTie ttie Town of Quincy 
1888 - Chartered as the City of Quincy 

QUINCY - TODAY 

Population: State Census 85,375 
Land area: 16.77 square miles 
Shoreline: 26 miles 

Tax Rate: $13.46 Residential, $28.79 Commercial 
Assessed Valuation: $4,450,597,279 





23rd Annual 

Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival 

Thursday, Friday, July 15-16' 

10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Saturday, July 1 7 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Great Buys and Great Entertamment 

Concerts, Mime Circus, l\/lulti-Cultural Food Fair, 
Wildlife Exhibit, Pony Rides, Children's Ferris Wheel 
and Merry-go-Round, Magician, Clowns, Trolley 
Bus Tours to Quincy's Historic Sites, and lots more. 

Come join the fun on Hancock St. which will be 
closed off as a pedestrian mall. 

Sponsored by tt^e 
Quincy Center Business 
& Professional Association 







ThuTMlay, July 1, 1993 Qidncy Sun Pas« 25A 



i\ 



1 
f 

i 
I 



Shop In Quincy s Historic District 





Where youll find 
thousands of new Hard & 
Softcover Books for i 

Presidents Place 

Historic Downtown Quincy 

Mon-Fri 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 to 6:00 p.m. 

328-4719 



Call for a Free Catalog 
Highest Quality • Lowest Prices 

A. E. Goodhue Company 

• Trophies • Plaques • Jackets 
• Religious Goods • Gifts • Engraving 

9 School Street TeL (6 1 7) 47 2-3090 

Quincy, MA FAX (617) 472-6304 



NEED CASH? 

Loans secured with your gold, jewelry, 

gems and precious watches. 

Pre-Owned 

Buy • Sell • Trade • Loan 



^j^Oi^&tf 



Jewelers 



So. Shore Bank BIdg. 
1402 Hancock St., Quincy 



773-3636 



Hanlon's Shoes 

Serving the Community 
for over 35 years 

• Hush Puppy • Daniel Green 

• Trotters • WiJlits • Converse 



Caryn^s Corner 

Casual Clothing and Accessories 
... at Reasonable Prices 

Historic Quincy 
T-Shirts and Sweatshirts 

VISA - MASTERCARD - AMERICAN EXPRESS 



1360 Hancock Street 
Quincy Square 



770-0536 



27B Cottage Avenue 
Quincy 



472-4926 



• Diamonds • 14K Gold Jewelry 

Phase II Jewelry & Gifts 

//, Jewelry at Discount Prices 

%^' (Wc*S£td. CAROLERS 

kjiik ^'H^* t?«W^ CoUectibles 
"Quincy" Pottery 

All wood, hand painted Adams House replicas 
1361 Hancock Street 
Quincy Square, MA (617) 472-6618 



Frantic Framers 

"Complete Picture Framing Service " 

Artists Materials • Prints • Ready Made Frames 

Nielsen Aluminum 

PICTURE FRAMING SPECIAL 

$39.95 ($85.00 value) 

• Up to 24" X 36" • Dry Mounted • Regular Glass 

• Ready to Hang • 52 Colors 

1592 Hancock Street 

Quincy, MA 02169 (617) 479-4352 




oS^^tifinitv * Crooks 

Downtown Quincy 's 
Full Line Book Store for the Entire Family 

Special Orders • Gift Certificates 
Cards • Books-on-Tape • Jewelry 
• T-shirts • Gift Items • Souvenirs 

1514 Hancock Street ^—^ ^^ ^^ 

Quincy 479-9941 



JOHNSON MOTOR PARTS 

Your Discount Auto Ports Store 

Full Service Machine Shop 
Serving the City of Presidents since 1942 



65 School Street 
Quincy 



472-6776 



Everlasting Engraving 

when the occasion is worth saving 

Souvenirs • Trays * Paperweights 
IVophies • Plaques • Clocks • Gifts 

1241 Hancock Street 770-7771 



Page 26A Quincy Sun Thursday, July 1, 1993 



Abigail Adams Wife, 
Mother Of Presidents 



Mrs. John Adams, the former 
Abigail Smith of Weymouth, is the 
only woman to be wife of one 
president and mother of another --- 
and she could have been 
grandmother of a vice president. 

Husband John was chief 
executive from 1797 to 1801; son of 
John Quincy occupied the White 
House from 1825 to 1829; and 
grandson Charles Francis Adams 
ran for vice president on the Free 
Soil ticket in 1848. 

An early advocate of women's 
rights. Abigail Adams once wrote to 
her husband, John: 

"In the new code of laws which I 
suppose it will be necessary for you 
to make, I desire you would 
remember the ladies and be more 
generous and favorable to them 
than your ancestors. 

"Do not put such unlimited 
power into the hands of the 
husbands. Remember, all men 
would be tyrants if they could. ' ' 




ABIGAIL ADAMS 



Abigail Adams: 
A Woman Of Special Honors 



Abigail (Smith) Adams was the 
only woman to be the wife of one 
President and mother of another. 

She was the wife of John Adams, 
our second President. 



She died in 1818, however, and did 
not see her son John Quincy Adams 
elected our sixth President. 

John Adams did live to see his son 
become President in 1825. 



We are proud 
to be a part of 
Quincy, a city 
with a rich and 
historical past 
and a great future. 



690 Adams St.. 
Lakin Square 

440 Hancock St. 
North Quincy 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

ALWAYS THE LEADER' -^ 



Hancock Cemetery 

Patriots, Early 

Settlers, Intrigue 

Buried Here 



Henry, the first Adams in Quincy, 
is buried there. So is the Rev. John 
Hancock, father of the first signer of 
the Declaration of Independence, 
And Col. John Quincy, for whom the 
city is named. 

But of all the 800 graves in the 
Hancock Cemetery, the Old Burying 
Ground of Colonial Quincy, most 
intriguing is one marked by a 
tombstone bearing this cryptic 
epitaph: 

"Erected to the memory of John 
R. Grieve: Died Nov. 12, 1850, age 22 
years, and Hannah Banks, his wife, 
died Nov. 12, 1850, age 15 years. 
Both of Zanesville, Ohio. Deluded by 
the writings of A.J. Davis." 

The mystery of John and Hannah 
has never been fully solved. 

They came to Quincy in 1850, not 
as man and wife, but as male cousins, 
John Green and George Sands. 
They obtained work in a shoe factory 
but rarely left their lodgings on Elm 
St., spending long hours reading 
books on spiritualism. 

Co-workers thought that George 
Sands looked frail, almost 
effeminate. It was widely suspected 
that "he" was a girl. A scheme was 
devised to test the theory. 

One day at lunch one of the shoe 
workers tossed George an apple. A 
man would catch it by closing his 
legs; a woman by spreading her skirt. 
Guess what "George" did! 

Humiliated, John and Hannah 
never went back to the factory. Nor 
did they ever return to the house on 
Elm St. Their frozen bodies were 
found next spring by rabbit hunters 
on Penn's Hill, locked in a loving 
embrace. 

Several months later, the father of 
John Grieve arrived from Ohio to 
bury the young couple. It was he who 
directed the words to be chiselled on 
the headstone. He explained no 
further. 

A.J. Davis was never identified for 
sure. But Andrew Jackson Davis, a 
spiritualist, hypnotist and faith 
healer, was then practicing in 
Boston. 

Among the belongings found in 
the Elm St. lodging house were these 
words, written by 15-ycar-old 
Hannah Banks: 

"To the oppressed and down- 
trodden, to the suffering and 
afflicted, I would cry out.. .Death is 
only an event, only a circumstance in 
the eternal life experience of the 
human soul. Death is simply a birth 
into a new and perfect state of 
existence." 

Not far from the grave of John and 
Hannah is a tomb bearing words that 
cry out of an earlier injustice: 

"Three precious friends under this 
tombstone lie 

"Patterns to aged, youth and 
infancy. 




HANCOCK CEMETERY 



"A great mother, her learned son, 
with child. 

"The first and least went free. He 
was exiled. 

"In love to Christ, this country, 
and dear friends 

"He left his own, cross'd seas and 
for amends 

"Was here extoll'd, and envy'd all 
in a breath, 

"His noble consort leaves, is 
drawn to death, 

"Stranger changes may befall us 
ere we die, 

"Blest they who will arrive 
eternity. 

"God grant some names, O thou 
New England's friend. 

"Don't sooner fade than thine, if 
times don't mend." 



The tomb with its hidden message 
contains the family of the Rev. 
Leonard Hoar, third president of 
Harvard College, a man too liberal 
for his times. 

He was forced by the General 
Court of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony to resign at the instigation of 
religious opponents and jealous 
colleagues for permitting Harvard to 
"languish and decay." Eight months 
later in November 1675, he was dead 
at 45. 

In 1975, the same General Court, 
now of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, righted the 300-year- 
old wrong done to the Rev. Mr. Hoar 
by "proclaiming and confirming his 
innocence of any misdeeds while 
president of Harvard College." 

The cemetery, on Hancock St., 
Quincy Sq., next to City Hall, is 
open to the public. There is no 
admission charge. 



Thursday, July 1, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 27 A 



Quinc\;'s Newest Tourist Attraction 



The U.S. Naval And Shipbuilding Museum 



The Quincy Fore River Shipyard, 
one of the most productive and prolific 
sfiipyards in the country before closing 
in 1986, will be the site of the city's 
newest tourist attraction in 1994. 

The $5 million United States Naval 
and Shipbuilding Museum is scheduled 
to open next spring on a six-acre site 
on the banks of the Fore River. The 
museum will consist of an array of 
naval vessels and three exhibit halls full 
of artifacts explaining and detailing 
ship-building in Quincy, naval history, 
naval life and ship design. 

The museum will also be the home 
ofthe Massachusetts Military Research 
Center, the most extensive private 
collection of U.S. military artifacts, 
documents and records in the United 
States. 

The museum's crown jewel will be 
the U.S.S. Salem (CA-139), the largest 
"big gun" cruiser for the USN which 
was built by Bethlehem Steel and 
launched at the Quincy shipyard in 
March, 1947. The Salem is expected 
to steam home in late August or early 
September and museum organizers 
hope to have the ship open for tours 
later this year. 

Equipped with 8-inch guns arvJ au- 
tomatic firing, the U.S.S. Salem was 
faster, more durable and more heavily 



armed than its predecessor. The 718- 
foot ship was longer than any battleship 
attacked at Pearl Harbor. It once 
served as the flag ship of the Sixth Reet 
in the Mediterranean Sea. 

Other ships are expected to join the 
Salem, including submarines, destroy- 
ers and other historical vessels . Besides 
visitation, these ships will be used for 
educational and instructional purposes. 

But Quincy 's naval museum will be 
more than just a naval museum. With 
the Massachusetts Military Research 
Center, the museum will be unlike any 
other in the country. 

The military collection, with thou- 
sands of artifacts from the Revolutionary 
War to the present, is the second largest 
military archives in the United States. 
Only the federal government's National 
Military Archives in Washington is 
larger. 

The collection, valued at $50 to $60 
million, consists of: 

Four tons of historical documents; 
200,000 paintings, lithographs, and 
photographs; hurxireds of antique flags, 
uniforms and firearms; and thousands 
of nniscellaneous military artifacts dat- 
ing from the early Massachusetts Mili- 
tia ( 1 7 76- 1 820) to recent engagements 
like the Persian Gulf War. 

In addition, there are weapons, tanks. 



armored personnel carriers, howitzers, 
cannons and a variety of small arms, 
swords and bayonets. 

One of the oWest artifacts is a war 
document signed by John Hancock 
when he was governor of Massachusetts 
in 1787. Recent additions include a 
captured Iraqi armored vehicle and two 
U.S. tanks. 

The museum will be unique in that 
many artifacts will be grouped into 
exhibits. Each exhibit will have a par- 
ticular theme and explain a facet of 
military past told from a human per- 
spective. The exhibits will change 
continually, giving the museum a new 
look and visitors a reason to return 
again and again. 

For instance, a working trench sys- 
tem will be recreated inside the museum 
"right down to the smell. " The research 
center has one of the largest collections 
of WorW War I artifacts and visitors will 
be able to walk through the sourxl- 
wired trench and hear "bullets whizzing 
by." 

A ballistics range complying with 
federal and state regulations is also 
planned so reenactment groups who 
drill on the USNSM can test fire their 
period weapons. 

The museum will also feature many 
state-of-the-art amenities. 



A 1 00-seat theater will show vin- 
tage feature films and video interviews 
with shipyard workers and sailors. A 
benefactor's lounge and function room 
will accommodate up to 800 people 
for ship reunions and social functions. 

Drill grounds will be the site of militia 
musters by historical reenactment 
groups. A museum gift shop will offer 
gifts, photos, books and other memo- 
rabilia. 

For most of the 20th century, the 
Quincy Fore River Shipyard bustled 
with activity, producing more than 700 
Navy vessels as well as cargo and pas- 
senger ships from 1903 to 1986. 

The United States Naval and Ship- 
building Museum and Massachusetts 
Military Research Center will preserve 
that proud heritage and allow visitors of 
all ages to relive those glory years, and 
remember the thousands of workers 
who helped manufacture some of the 
world's mightiest ships. 

To learn more about the 
United States Naval and Ship- 
building Museum, call 6 1 7-479- 
7900 or send for a free bro- 
chure: USNSM, 1250 Hancock 
St., Suite 105N, Quincy, MA 
02169. 



"Quincy built ... " 

It was the best thing you could say about a ship. It stood for quality, durability, 
craftsmanship, innovation, and pride. And it was the hallmark of the more than 700 
vessels built at Quincy's famous Fore River Shipyard. 

Now, that history will be preserved at the new US Naval and Shipbuilding Museum 
scheduled to open in the Spring of 1994. The 10-acre complex on Quincy's Fore River will 
feature: 

♦The U.S.S. SALEM heavy cruiser open for guided tours ofthe crew's quarters, 
bridge, and command centers~and special events in the Admiral's suite. 

♦The new Massachusetts Military Research Center including historical archives and 
hands-on exhibits of artillery, tanks, and other equipment from U.S. and enemy forces. 

♦Three exhibit halls full of displays on Shipbuilding in Quincy, Naval History, Naval 
Life, and Ship Design. 

♦A 1 00-seat theater showing vintage 
feature films and video interviews with 
Shipyard workers and sailors. 

♦The Benefactors' Lounge and 
Function Room accommodating up to 800 
people for ship reunions and social 
functions. 

♦Drill grounds for militia musters by 
historical reenactment groups. 

♦Visiting Tall Ships and other foreign 
vessels. 

♦A museum shop offering gifts, photos, 
books and other memorabilia. 

♦Easy access by Water Shuttle from 
Boston and by car from Route 3A. 



s 




Be on board when the USS SALEM 

makes the final voyage to her berth at 

the USNSM this FalL 

Those who have donated at the "Plankowner" 
level before the voyage will be invited to join 
original SALEM plankowners from 1 949 as the 
ship is towed with all due honors from the Port 
of Boston to the Fore River Shipyard where she 
was built. 

Call the Museum office for details: 
617-479-7900 



/ 



To learn more about the history we're rebuilding 
in Quincy, call us at 617-479-7900 or send for 
our free brochure: USNSM, 1250 Hancock St., 
Sutte 105N, Quincy, MA 02169. 



i m 



Page 28A Qiiincv Sun Thursday. July 1. 1993 




John Adams 



Welcome 

to the 

City of 
Presidents 



Recycle 




John Quinci; Adams 




TM 



A Neighborhood Recycling Program 

Specialists in 

Recycling and Waste Collection 

for Industrial, Commercial and 

Residential Customers. 





\\Xik. 



"Proud to he part of the Cleaner Greener Team oJQuincy." 



"Waste 




TM 



QUINCY DISTRICT 

22 Nightingale Ave. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

617/471-7900 







VOL. 25 No. 42 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 




A Quincy 4th 



^ 




MISS MERRYMOUNT, Dianne McGunigle, left, poses with last year's winner, 
Michelle Glennon, during the Merrymount Fourth of July Parade. 




FIFE AND DRUM (Joe Doyle, left, William Gardner) was part of a costume contest in 
the Squantum Fourth of July Parade. 




ANDREW TRUBIANO, age two, patiently awaits the decision of judges on the bicycle 
decorating contest at the Ward 2 Field Day at Fore River Field. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



Immunization Clinic 
For Children July 16 



The Quincy Health 
Department and the 
Alliance for The Homeless 

will hold immunization 
clinics for children at the 
John F. Kennedy Health 



Center Auditorium Friday, 
July 16 from 9:30 to 11:30 
a.m. 

The clinics will provide 
immunization to children 
ages one month to six 
years who are Quincy 



In The Parkingway 

$9 Million Senior 

Health Care 
Facility Planned 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

A plan to construct a $9 million elderly nursing and health care facility in 
Quincy Center was unveiled Tuesday, signaling what city and development 
officials hope is the next significant step toward downtown revitalization. 

Welch Healthcare and nursing and rehabilitation and trade unions. 



Retirement Group of 
Norwell will develop the 
facility to be known as 
Hancock Park. The 
announcement was made 
by the Quincy 2000 
Corporation, the public- 
private corporation 
charged with revitalizing 
Quincy 's business districts. 
The project calls for 
several components, 
including: a 142-bed 



center, an adult day health 
center and an assisted 
living residence. 

Mayor James Sheets 
said the project, the first 
for Quincy 2000, will help 
revitalize Quincy Center, 
especially the southern 
end of Hancock St. He 
said Quincy 2000 was 
instrumental in bringing 
together numerous parties 
including the developer 



"This is why Quincy 
2000 was formed- to bring 
together all parties in order 
to facilitate development. 
This clearly indicates that 
Quincy 2000 works as a 
concept and in practice. 

"It's kind of the opening 
gun so to speak in terms of 
Quincy 200 which is the 
city, the business 
community and labor all 

Cont'd on Page 2 



Public Hearing Tonight 
On MWRA Pump Project 



State Sen. Michael 
Morrissey and State Reps. 
Stephen Tobin, Ronald 
Mariano and Michael 
Bellotti announce that the 
MWRA will hold a public 
hearing tonight (Thursday) 
at part of its facilities 
plarming process for the 
MWRA's Quincy Pump 
Facilities project. 

The hearing will be 
held at 7:30 p.m. in the 
second floor Conference 
Room at City Hall, 1305 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. MWRA officials 
will give a brief summary 
of the project, describe the 
recommended alternative 
and the associated 



impacts, and answer 
questions and receive 
comments from the public 
arid local officials. 

The project will consist 
of the rehabilitation- 
replacement of three pump 
stations and three force 
mains located in Quincy. 
The stations are owned 
and operated by the 
MWRA and provide 
exclusive use to the 
residents of Quincv. 

The Quincy Pump 
Station is a 52 m.g.d. 
(millions of gallons per 
day) facility which went 
on line in 1906. The 
Squantum Pump Station is 



an 8 m.g.d. facility 
constructed in the late 
1930s and the Houghs 
Neck Lift Station is a 2.8 
m.g.d. facility which has 
been in continuous use 
since 1942. 

MWRA officials have 
said that the rehabilitation- 
replacement of the 
facilities and related force 
mains is necessary to 
provide the city with 

reliable service into the 
next century. The 
completion of the project 
will reduce the likelihood 
of back-ups, overflows and 
breakage in the city's 
sewerage system. 




residents. Contact the 
public health nurses to 
schedule an appointment. 

Nurses can be reach 
weekdays from 1 to 4 p.m. 
by caUing 376-1284. 



AN AUTOMOBILE involved an accident on the Fore River Bridge several months ago 
was part of a thought-provoking display with the message "Don't Drink and Drive -- 
Make It a Safe Holiday" set up outside the Quincy Police SUtion on Sea St during the 
holiday weekend. According to Chief Francis Mullen, approximately 50,000 vehicles 
pass through the intersection of Sea St., Coddington St. and Southern Artery on a daUy 
basis. Mullen said he thought the display was effective and sent a message to motorists. 
"This holiday weekend was relatively quiet compared to other Fourths," Mullen said, 

adding there were no fatal accidents in Quincy. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Mosquito Sprayings 
Scheduled This Week 



The Quincy Health 
Department has received 
notice from the Norfolk 
County Mosquito Control 
Project regarding early 



described above will be 
entirely sprayed on a given 
date. Attempts will be 
made to spray as large an 
area of western Quincy on 



morning applications this Tuesdays and as large an 

week of the pesticide ^ea of Eastern Quincy on 

resmethrin for the control Thursdays. The spraying 

of adult mosquitoes. will occur between 2 and 7 

Sprayings were a.m. 
scheduled for the following If inclement weather 

dates and sites: occurs or equipment fails, 

•July 6 (last Tuesday) the application will be 

in selected areas of added to the next 



Quincy west of Hancock 
St. and west of 
Washington St., including 
Montclair, western 
portions of Atlantic, inland 
portions of Wollaston, 
South Quincy, and inland 
sections of Quincy Point. 

•July 8 (today) in 
selected areas of Quincy 
east of Hancock St. and 
east of Washington St., 
including Squantum, 
eastern portions of 
Atlantic, Norfolk Downs, 
coastal Wollaston, 
Merrymount, Houghs ' 
Neck, Germantown, and 
coastal Quincy Point. 

Not all areas as 



scheduled day, or 
rescheduled for the 
following day. 

Resmethrin is used due 
to its compatibility with 
the environment, very low 
toxicity to mammals, low 
irritation levels, and the 
fact it does not harm other 
wildlife. 

Notice of future 
spraying dates (the 
following week's 
schedule) will be made 
available to the Health 
Department from the 
Mosquito Control Project 
(762-3681) each Friday 
afternoon through 
September. 



16 Residents Receive 
Boston College Degrees 



Sixteen Quincy 
residents recently received 
degrees from Boston 
College. 

They are: 

Sean Capplis, 150 

Milton St., AB in English; 

Jeffrey P. Connor, 1 Pratt 

Rd., BS in finance; Tim J. 

Evans, 23 Ruthuen St., BS 

in finance cum laude; Paul 

J. Flynn, 118 Highland 

Ave., BS in marketing; 

Kristin C. Hatch, 28 

Glendale Rd., AB in 

history; Brian K. Howlett, 

75 Presidential Dr., BS in 

marketing; Brian Leong, 



NEWSCARRIEhS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



144 Farrington St., BS in 
computer science and 
economics; Robert W. 
Luiso, 43 Union St., BS in 
marketing/finance cum 
laude; Paul M. 
McDonnell, 121 Shore 
Ave., AB in economics; 
Alison P. McGowan, 133 
Urica St., AB in 
psychology; Cara M. 
McNally, 60 Division St., 
BS in nursing; Annie S. 
Mui, 30 Dunbarton Rd., 
BS in info systems; Sheila 
M. O'Connor, 83 Burgin 
Parkway, BS in 
accounting; Nancy L. 
Salters, AB in English 
magna cum laude; Patrick 
G. Thompson, 64-2 
Precedertial Dr., AB in 
sociology; and Sandra P. 
Wysocki, 981 Sea St., BS 
in env geo science. 




WELCH HEALTHCARE and Retirement Group of 
Norwell has unveiled a plan to construct a $9 million 
elderly nursing and health care facility in Quincy Center 
in the Parkingway. The facility would be located 



adjacent to two existing senior housing centers, Hancock 
House and Hancock Court. Officials hope to start 
construction in September, 1994. 



$9 Million Senior Health 
Care Facility Planned 



(Con'i From Page 1) 

working together. This is 
also indicative of the fact 
that we ore moving to put 
more retail clients on the 
southern end of Hancock 
St. 

"The residents of the 
health care facility and 
their visitors will give that 
end of Hancock St. a 
tremendous boost." 

D'Aprix agreed. "This 
project cements the 
revitalization of a key part 
of Quincy Center. There is 
no doubt that this 
development project will 
spawn additional 
development in Quincy 
Center. 

"Moreover, the jobs 
provided will serve to 
stimulate the Quincy 
economy." 

Sheets also praised the 
development concept and 
Welch Healthcare whom 
he called a "top notch 
group." We're pleased 
they have chosen to move 
into Quincy and this part 
of Quincy Center." 

The mayor and Charles 
D'Aprix, executive 
director of Quincy 2000, 
thanked Peter O'Connell 



BRENNAN'S 

fine tobacco • cigarettes • lottery 

Name Brand Cigarettes 

Only $2.21 per pack + tax 

Many Brands as low as 

$ 1 .45 per pack + tax 



In Store Lottery Raffle 

stop in for details 
No Purchase Necessary 



Hours: Mon-Sat 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sun 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Two convenient locations 

1 442 Hancock St 1 255 River St 

Quincy Square Cleary Square 

61 7-786-8610 Quincy Square 

6 1 7-36 1 - 1 444 Cleary Square, Hyde Park 



for helping to facilitate the 
project. O'Connell's 
development firm is 
selling the land for the 
project to the Welch 
Healthcare and Retirement 
Group. 

The six-story, 100,000- 
square-foot building will 
be located on the 
Parkingway adjacent to 
the existing senior housing 
centers in Quincy Center 
known as Hancock House 
and Hancock Court. 
Essentially, the facility 
will have four aspects. 

The 142-bed nursing 
) and rehabilitation center 
will focus on post-acute 
rehabilitation, skilled 
nursing care, specialized 
Alzheimer's care and 
respite care. 

The adult day health 
center will serve up to 24 
clients per day by offering 
therapies, counselling, 
meals and social 
stimulation. 

Transportation and respite 
for caregivers will be 
available. 

The assisted living 
residence will feature 40 
private studio and one- 
bedroom apartments. The 
residence is geared toward 
elders who may need 
additional care but not 
daily care services and 
skilled nursing. 

Among those services 
will be meals, 
housekeeping, personal 
care and wellness 
programs, 24-hour 
emergency response, and 
activities and 

transportation. 

The assisted living 
residence will also include 
"the Commons," which 
will consist of a dining 



room, library and parlor, 
club room, wellness 
center, and shops such as 
a cafe, general store and 
salon. 

Finally, Hancock Park 
will be integrated with 
Hancock House and 
Hancock Court to make up 
a "care campus." The 
campus will allow a 
delivery of services to all 
residents, coordination of 
activities and 

transportation and access 
to shops. 

Officials behind the 
project say the facility will 
address the growing 
elderly population in 
Quincy. Presently, there 
are approximately 14,000 
citizeiis age 65 or older in 
Quincy. That number is 
projected to increase to 
15,000 by the end of the 
decade. 

According to Paul 
Casale of Welch 
Healthcare, Massachusetts 
estimates a need for 1146 
nursing home beds by the 
year 2000. Current supply 
is 485, he noted. 

Casale said projects 
such as Hancock Park 
gives seniors housing and 
support services for those 
75 and older while 
allowing elders to remain 
independent and avoid 
premature 
institutionalization. 

Economically, Hancock 
Park has other pluses. 
Officials say the project 
will provide construction 



In addition, the facility 
will generate real estate 
tax revenue and have little 
impact on city services, 
officials said. 

Construction is 
expected to start in 
September, 1994 and 
continue for 12 to 14 
months. Welch 

Healthcare is confident the 
project will be financed by 
the Department of Housing 
and Urt)an Development in 
the form of a FHA 
mortgage, similar to the 
Quincy Hospital 

reconstruction project of 
the late 1980s. 

"We feel very confident 
that HUD will go along 
with it," Casale said. 
Welch Healthcare went 
through a similar process 
in receiving permission to 
build a similar facility in 
Hingham later this year. 

One business. Prestige 
Cleaners, will be relocated 
in the immediate area to 

make way for the 
demolition. 

The building's exterior 
will consist of granite, 
bricks and a metal roof. 
Architect Richard Heym 
said the building was 
designed incorporating 
features of other buildings 
in the area 

The Zoning Board of 
Appeals was expected to 
approve a variance for the 
project at its meeting 
Tuesday. The project 
would not need City 
jobs '^and stimulate the Council approval because 
local economy. Once *^ ^^^ is zoned business, 
finished, the facility is °o* Planned Unit 
expected to employ 160 Development. Sheets has 
fijll and part-time workers ^^"^ ^ better to the Zoning 
with an annual payroU of ^osid stating his "full 
about $3.6 million. support" for the project. 



Kathryn Wenniger Awarded 
Liver Foundation Student Research Fellowship 



North Quincy Resident 
Kathryn E. Wenniger, of 
Tufts Medical School, 
Boston has received the 
Anjani E. Panikker 
Memorial Award from the 
American Liver 

Foundation. 

She is investigating 
how cholesterol is 



transported within cells 
and is working in 
collaboration with Laura 
Liscum, Ph.D., Assistant 
Professor of Physiology of 
Tufts University. 

The American Liver 
Foundation Student 
Research Awards provide 
$2,500 to encourage young 
scientists their work in 



liver research. 

Since it began funding 
research in 1980, the 
Foundation has awarded 
$2,961,000 in research 
grants. This year the 
Foundation has awarded 
four Liver Scholars, 14 
Postdoctoral Research 
Fellowships and six 
student Research Awards. 



No Threat To Environment 

10,000 Gallon Animal Fat 
Spill Quickly Cleaned Up 



Thursday, Julj 8, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 3 



By BILL DONCASTER 

Ten thousand gallons of 
animal fat that spilled 
from a Procter & Gamble 
rail car on Monday, was 
cleaned up by Tuesday 
afternoon, according to the 
Coast Guard marine safety 
office in Boston and Fire 
Chief Thomas Gorman. 

The bulk of the animal 
fat was contained on a 
gravel roadway with 10 to 
20 percent flowing into a 
storm drain and into the 
Fore River. 

Coast Guard sources 



said the spills of this 
nature are usually cleaned 
up quickly, since the fatty 
acids float to the surface. 
It was cleaned up using a 
containment boom and 
removed from the water 
using absorbant pads or 
vacuuming. 

It posed no threat the 
environment, according to 
the Coast Guard, as it is 
had a very mild acidic 
content. It is used as an 
animal feed supplement. 

The spill happened 



Monday at 3:45 as a 
20,000 gallon capacity rail 
car spilled roughly 10,000 
gallons at the Procter & 
Gamble Plant while 
awaiting shipment. 

According to Gorman, it 
was the result of a drain 
cap being knocked off the 
car. 

The cleanup was done 
by Clean Harbors, Inc., of 
Boston, with the 
cooperation of Procter & 
Gamble and the Coast 
Guard. 




One Injured But Little 
Trouble At H N Bonfire 



QUINCY DEPUTY FIRE Chief Paul Cuddy shows KrisU Aronson, age six, how to "Stop, 
Drop and Roll" at Quincy Hospital's recent Safety Saturday program as a group of 
children look on. Cuddy said it is important for young children to react quickly if they 
are faced with a fire emergency. 

Wreath Laying To Mark 
John Quincy Adams Birthday 



Despite an injury, 
Police Chief Francis 
Mullen said there was 
little trouble at the Houghs 
Neck 4th of July bonfire 
Saturday night. 

"It was a bigger crowd 
than anticipated," said 
Mullen. "Any time you 
have that many people 
gathered in one place, you 
have a potential situation." 

There was one injury 
when someone threw a 
firecracker, an M-80, into 
the fire. Diane Cole was 
hurt when it exploded near 
her leg. According to 
Mullen she was treated at 
Quincy Hospital and 
released. 

He said in years past 
there has been little 
incident at the 
neighborhood 4th of July 
bonfire. 

"With the exception of 
the firecracker," Mullen 



said, "there wasn't a 
problem this year either." 

Mullen did add that 
there was drinking going 
on at the event, and it 
seemed as though people 
were coming in from 
outside the area. 

Mullen said that before 
next year's bonfire he 
plans to meet with Houghs 
Neck neighborhood leaders 
and councillors to see if 
the event can't be even 
safer. 

Fire Chief Thomas 



Gorman said the Quincy 
Fire Department does not 
officially condone the 
bonfire. 

"But if we tried to put a 
stop to it we'd have a 
pretty unruly crowd on our 
hands," Gorman said. 

The fire department for 
the past three years has 
been on hand at the event 
and extinguishes the fire 
about midnight, after the 
fireworks are over. 

By BILL DONCASTER 



At the order of 
President Bill Clinton, a 
wreath will be placed on 
the tomb of President John 
Quincy Adams in a 
ceremony Sunday, July 11 
at noon at United First 
Parish Church (Unitarian), 
Quincy. 

The ceremony will 
commemorate the 226th 
birthdate anniversary of 
President John Quincy 
Adams, sixth president of 
the United States, who 
was bom July 11, 1767, 
son of President John and 
Abigail Adams. 

The tomb is in the crypt 



of the church alongside the 
tombs of his parents and 
his wife Louisa Catherine 
Adams. The church is 
located at 1306 Hancock 
St., Quincy Center, 
opposite City Hall. 

Commander Peter 
Ligman, CO., U.S. Naval 
Reserve Center, Quincy, 
will present the wreath on 
behalf of President 
Clinton. 

Mayor James Sheets 
and Dr. Sheldon W. 
Bennett, minister of 
United First Parish 
Church, will deliver brief 
remarks. 



The public is invited 
and encouraged to attend. 
Call 773-0062 for 
information. 

The placing of 
presidential wreaths at the 
tombs of deceased 
presidents of their 
birthdate anniversaries is 
an annual observance first 
ordered by President 
Lyndon Johnson in 1966. 

Save Gas and Monay 
Shop Locally 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



DRIVERS WANTED 



Deliver The Quincy Sun to 

news outlets and carriers 

on Wednesday afternoons. 

Must have own car. 

Familiarity with 

Quincy streets a plus. 

Call Bob at 471-3100 






FLY TO 
CAPE COD 
BY BOAT! 

Back by popular demand - 
our 2-1/2 hour cruise 
to Provincetown! 

Fly by the highways and bridges. 
This is the fastest, most fun way 
to the tip of Cape Cod! 
Spend 4 hours exploring the sights, 
shops, and streetside eateries. You can 
even explore the sand dunes, or climb the 
Pilgrim Monument and see back to Boston 
After your fun-filled day, relax with a 
cocktail on your cruise back as we watch 
the sun set over the Boston skyline. 
Sailing from Bay Pointe Marina in Quincy, 
every Wednesday & Thuraday, June 23- 
Sept. 2. [)eparts at 9, returns at 6:30. Kids 
age 8 and under go free. 



^""^^^^ 






617»770»1008 



r Quincy to 

• Provincetown 
BOAT EXPRESS 



Most trips 
reservations 



Located 3/4 mile north of the fore River Bridge 
Bay Pointe Marina. Washington Court. Quincy 




NOW OPEN 




Selections from our Menu 
Garden Greens 

• Ceasar's Salad • Grilled Chicken Salad 

Burgers & Sandwiches 

• 10 oz. Basic Burger • Prime Rib Sandwich 

Little Italy 

• Pizza • Sauteed Chicken Broccoli & Ziti 

Appetizers 

• Ultimate Nachos • Buffalo Wings 

• Fried Chicken Wings • Fried Zuccini 

Charbroiled Specl\lties 

• Steak Tips • Baby Back Ribs 

• Pork Chops • Roast Prime Rib of Beef 

The Daily Catch 

• Native Broiled Schrod • Broiled Scallops 

• Fish & Chips * Fried Seafood Platter 

/>^^y Lunch and Dinner Specials ] 



(617) 479-2400 

520 Washington Street, Quincy 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



OPINION 





USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr . Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 



30« p«r copy. $12.00 p«r year by mail In Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outside Quincy. $17 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 47l-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Ouincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St . Ouincy. Mass 02169 



The Quincy Sun aisumas nc financial responsibility lor 
typographical errors m adxeriisemenis but will reprint that 
part o( an advertiserrent in which the typographical erro' 
occurs 



'A^- 



Snug Harbor School 
Holds Reading Day 



Snug Harbor 

Community School 
recently held its second 
annual Reading Day. 

Former students, 
college age through adult, 
were invited to read a 
book to a class and talk to 
the children about 
Germantown and Snug 
Harbor School when they 
attended. Alumni were 
encouraged to talk about 
their life since they left 
the school and what they 
are doing now. 

Alumni who 

participated this year are: 

Rep. Steve Tobin, 
Attorney Thomas S. 
Barrett, Attorney Paul 
Wahlberg, Attorney 
Michael Long, Dawn 
Elwood, assistant publisher 



of Parents' Paper, Nancy 
Hebert, second grade 
teacher, Bernazzani 
School; Edmund Grogan, 
social studies teacher at 
Atlantic Middle School; 
and Delores Terry, first 
grade teacher. Snug 
Harbor Community School. 

Pictures were taken of 
the alumni and each of 
them filled out a form 
which the school plans to 
use for a "Wall of Fame." 
The wall will include the 
picture of each alumni 
accompanied underneath 
with the Germantown 
address where they Uved, 
their occupation (if 
working outside the 
home); and words of 
advice to current students. 




BUYU.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



^ Medically 
^ Speaking 

by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C. 




US THE SEASON FOR 

Maybe all those 
children's songs about "Mr. 
GoMen Sun" and "Let The 
Sun Shine In' should get a 
rewrKe. After all, the sun is 
responsible for most cases 
of skin cancer, and skin 
cancer is the most common 
type of cancer in the United 
States. That means that 
now, during the season of 
sun-worshipping, we need 
to be careful. Protection 
from the sun is a must, in 
the form of protective 
clothing (sun hats, long 
sleeves and pants) and 
sunscreen, with the higher 
the Sun Protection Factor 
(SPF) the better. However, 
protection must be linked 
with being alertto the signs 
of skin cancer. Any new 
growth, change in skin 
color or texture, or sore 
that doesn't heal should 
receive prompt profes- 
sional attention 
P.S. All skin cancers are 



SKIN CANCER ALERT 

curable - IF they are 
treated before they have 
a chance to spread to 
other parts of the body. 

Remember to apply 
your sunscreen at least a 
half hour before venturing 
outside. If you woukJ like 
to learn what you can do 
to stay healthy and ward 
off the dangers of heart 
attacks, feel free to call 
any of the doctors — my- 
self. Dr. Lisa Antonelli, or 
Dr. Ronald Dunlap, at 
COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE at 472- 
2550. If necessary, we will 
refer you to another 
medical professional. Of- 
fice hours are by appoint- 
ment. We have more 
parking at our new office, 
located in Crown Colony, 
700 Congress St, Suite 
2C, in Quincy. I am affili- 
ated with Quincy Hospital 
and South Shore Hospi- 
tals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Republican Movement 



The Republicans are coming. 
Not like the British. But they're coming. 

They're coming back to the political front. 

Of the seven new faces in this year's city election, 
five are Republicans. The other two are Democrats. 

Of course, the city election is non-partisan and 
candidates don't have a D or R designation with their 
names on the ballot. 

But the fact there are five new Republicans running 
for office in a Democratic stronghold like Quincy is 
interesting to say the least. 

For some time now a lot of Republicans haven't been 
too gimg-ho about taking on Democrats. Oh, they've 
thought about it and dreamed about it but when it came 
right down to it, political discretion often seemed to be 
the better of political valor. 

You can't blame them either. Not if you look at the 
voter registration figures. As of the last official count 
last Oct. 22 Quincy had 48,048 registered voters. Of 
these, 27,808 were Democrats, 6,894 were Republi- 
cans and 13,346 were imenrolled. 

It means Republicans are oumumbered by Demo- 
crats by 20,914. It also means Democrats outnimiber 
Republicans and the imenrolled together by 7,568. 

So, even allowing for the fact that the city election 
is non-partisan, the five new Republican candidates 
deserve a pat on the back. 

The five — all candidates for School Committee — 
are: Wendell Caley, Jr., Christine Cedrone, Shareda 
Hosein, Ron McCarthy and John Spada. 

The two new Democratic faces, incidentally, belong 
to Michael D'Amico, Ward 4 City Councillor candi- 
date and Gregory Hanley, School Committee candi- 
date. 

It's encouraging to see the Republican activity in 
this year's city election. 

Which raises a question: Will it carry over into next 
year's state election which is partisan, openly pitting 
RepubUcan against Democrat? 

Q 

MARTINERVIN has officially taken himself out of 
this year's mayoral race. He withdrew in a letter 
received on Tuesday by City Clerk Joseph Shea. The 
request in writing to withdraw is necessary because 
Ervin had aheady filed his nomination papers. 

ERVIN'S DEPARTURE leaves Mayor James Sheets 
with a possible date with history. 

Sheets could be the first mayor in the city's history 
to twice nm for re-election unopposed. No other mayor 




has had that political distinction. 

He is one of the only three mayors who have been 
unopposed for re-election once. That was 1991. The 
only other two accorded the distinction were Thomas 
Burgin in 1940 and Frank McCauley in 1983. 

Unless someone enters this year's mayoral field 
Sheets would be the first to nm twice unopposed. 

□ 
FORMER CITY COUNCILLOR Warren Powers 
will be sworn in Tuesday, July 19 as 
associate justice of Quincy Disuict 
Court. 

He will take the oath of office at 
5:15 p.m. in the chamber of the House 
of Representatives at the State House 
at a ceremony headed by Gov. William POWERS 
Weld and Lt. Gov. Paul Cellucci. A reception will 
follow. 

Powers, 5 1 , served as Ward 5 councillor from 1 974 
to 1 977. He has been a Norfolk County assistant district 
attorney since 1971 and has been in charge of all 
district court jury uials in the county. 

Powers is married to the formerly Holly Grazioso of 
Quincy and they now live in Norfolk. 

U 
FRANK McCAULEY always liked to look and plan 
ahead when he was Quincy mayor. He 
still does. He's already preparing for 
the fifth annual Jiminy Fimd Marathon 
Walk which will be held Sunday, Oct. 
10 with a 7 a.m. starting time. 

The 26.2-mile walk, which 
McCAULEY covers the same route as the Boston 
Marathon, is sponsored by the Dana-Farber Cancer 
Instimte. 

McCauley was among the more than 400 walkers 
honored recently at a reception for those who last year 
raised $500 or more. 

McCauley raised $9,61 1 — third highest total among 
3,500 walkers bringing his four-year total to $23,564. 
His time for last year's walk was six hours and 13 
minutes. 

Anyone wishing to sponsor Frank this year and help 
a most worthy cause, can reach him at 479-6230. 

□ 
WONDER HOW MANY people down through the 
years have stepped on the scales in the lobby of the 
South Shore Bank in Quincy Sq. for a free weight 
check? It's hard to walk by without getting on. 




Readers Forum 



Commends Morrissey For Not 
Bowing To Special Interest Pressure 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 
This letter serves to 
commend Sen. Michael 
Morrissey who stood up for 
the environment, for 
students' rights and for 
MASSPIRG. It also serves 
to point up another 
outrageous example of 
public interest sway on 
Beacon Hill. 

At approximately 7 a.m. 
on Wednesday, June 23 
the state Senate adopted 
an amendment to the 
Fy94 budget sponsored by 
Sen. Brian Lees (R-E. 
Longmeadow) to destroy 



MASSFIRG's college 
campus program. 

This amendment was 
being lobbied for by the 
Associated Industries of 
Massachusetts, a special 
interest trade association 
at odds with MASSPIRG 's 
consumer and 

enviroiunental agenda. It 
was stuck onto a budget, a 
tactic which precludes 
both the public hearing 
process that legislation is 
supposed to go through, as 
well as the citizens' right 
to repeal it (budgets 
carmot be repealed through 



referendum). 

The passage of this 
amendment, by a vote of 
20-19, with Senate 
President William Bulger 
casting a rare deciding 
vote, is a shameless and 
anti-democratic move on 
the part of the state 
legislature. There are 
hundreds of students, 
faculty, administrators, 
and college presidents 
signed onto a statement 
denouncing this attack for 
what it really is-a 
political attack on an 
effective interest 



organization that counters 
some of the tremendous 
special interest influence 
on public policy in 
Massachusetts. 

The Senate's action is a 
black mark against the 
efforts of all who work to 
protect the environment. 

We are lucky to have a 
senator that stands up for 
us and does not bow in the 
face of special interest 
pressure! 

Chris Mullin 

8 Hammond Court 

Quincy 



Devotes Life Helping Disabled Owner 

Time Running Out On 
Chelsea- A Very Special Dog 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 5 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Chelsea is a very 
special dog. 

A seven-year-old 
Doberman Pinscher who 
has been specially trained 
as an "assistance dog"— 
one that helps people with 
limitations caused by 
illness, injury or birth 
defects— she has helped 
countless people 
throughout the South 
Shore, most notably her 
owner. North Quincy 
native Ann Sava. She has 
brought hope to the 
hopeless, companionship 
to the lonely, joy to the 
saddened. 

And now, Chelsea is 
dying. 

Sava, 41, who now 
lives in North Weymouth, 
explained in a recent 
interview that Chelsea 
began having intestinal 
problems last February, 
and after a series of tests, 
a malignant melanoma 
tumor was discovered. The 
intestinal problems were 
treated with medication 
and the tumor removed, 
Sava said, and it appeared 
that Chelsea had 
weathered the storm. 

Unfortunately, Sava's 
joy quickly turned to 
renewed anguish when 
Chelsea was diagnosed 
last week with cirrhosis of 
the liver, a common 
disease among Dobermans. 
The cirrhosis, which 
doctors now say was the 
cause of the original 
intestinal problems, will in 
all likelihood spread very 
rapidly, leading to either a 
coma or a quick and 
relatively death. 

Originally, Sava said, 
Chelsea had been 
diagnosed with Wobbler 
Syndrome, another illness 
common among 

Dobermans which affects 
the neck vertebrae and 
eventually leads to 
complete paralysis. 
Because Chelsea has had 
problems walking in recent 
days, it was believed that 
Wobbler Syndrome was 
the reason, but it has since 
been ruled that the liver 
disease is the root of her 
problems. 

The bottom line, 
however, remains the 
same: Chelsea, who has 
helped so many others find 
the way to independence, 
is now for the first time in 
her life dependent on 
others. 

It wasn't supposed to 
end this way. Sava, who 
was injured in an industrial 
accident in 1986—an 
occurrence which caused 
her to lose the use of her 
right arm, damaged her 
back, and left her in 
constant pain--had 
purchased Chelsea as a 
newborn puppy that same 
year with the idea of 
keeping her as an 
everyday housepet. 

In 1988, however, 
doctors told Sava that her 



injuries bad left her 
permanently disabled. 
Sava, who knew her dog 
was exceptionally smart- 
Chelsea had been 
completely house-trained 
at six months— decided to 
have Chelsea trained as an 
assistance dog. 

With the help of Mike 
Kelley, a local 
professional trainer, Sava 
taught Chelsea the many 
responsibilities of living 
with a disabled person. 
The results, she said, have 
exceeded even her own 
expectations. 

"She learned so 
unbeUevably quick," said 
Sava. "She started doing 
everything for me." 

Indeed, Chelsea helps 
Sava in and out of bed and 
the shower, picks up any 
items that Sava drops 
("even those as small as 
rings and coins"), assists 
Sava at the supermarket 
by taking items off shelves 
to low for her to reach, and 
even answers the phone. 

Most importantly, 
Chelsea has the uncanny 
ability to predict the 




au«»^ .u P..U..V c». h °^i:?.t: T *!^'^"»?y "' Doberm.n Pinscher who 

chrome migr^nes which ^^^'^^'t ^o'k ••*"'*!^ ^T^' "^'^ disabilities, 

ho„„ «io„.,rH Co„o e; snuggles up to her owner, Ann Sava, in their North 

Weymouth home. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



have plagued Sava since 
her accident. According to 
Sava, Chelsea can sense 
the migraines IS to 40 
minutes before they occur, 
and experts have various 
theories on why certain 
animals are equipped with 
this talent. 

Sava said for the first 
time since her accident, 
she felt a new sense of 
freedom-and all because 
of Chelsea. 

"She changed my life 
drastically," said Sava. 
"She made me feel safe 
and gave me the courage 
to go outside. It's often 
very frightening when life 
changes and you're 
suddenly faced with 
certain limitations. 

"She gave me so much. 
She gave me 

independence, and I 
wanted to share that with 
others, so I 
program." 



elementary and middle 
school as well as The 
Woodward School, Sacred 
Heart School, St. Mary's 
School and various other 
groups and organizations. 
Two schools they visit 
annually are the Squantum 
School and the Lincoln- 
Hancock School, the latter 
of which holds a birthday 
party for Chelsea each 
May. 

In addition to the 
demonstrations, Sava and 
Chelsea have provided 
literature and additional 
information to those who 
request it, and have helped 
other individuals find 
assistance dogs of their 
own. 

Sava has experienced 
many memorable moments 
started the through the program. 

"We'd go to places like 



The program Sava Children's Hospital (in 

referred to is Partners For Boston) and Chelsea 

The Disabled, which she would always seem to find 

began in 1989 under the ^^ person most in needs 

sponsorship of the South o^ cheering up-she would 

Shore Humane Society, always pick the right one 



Since its inception, Sava 
and Chelsea have visited 
schools, church groups, 

community associations 
and other organizations 
throughout the South Shore 
and given demonstrations 
teaching people the value 
of assistance dogs. 

(Assistance dogs, Sava 
noted, can be categorized 
into three types: "seeing 
eye" or "guide" dogs that 
assist the bUnd, "hearing 
ear" or "signal" dogs for 
the deaf, and "service" 



out of the crowd," said 
Sava. "Everyone who 
meets her just sees there's 
something very special 
about her." 

For Sava, the thought of 
life without Chelsea is not 
a pleasant one. Although 
she has owned a second 
Doberman, Zephyr, for the 
past two years— he already 
performs some of 
Chelsea's duties, said 
Sava, but cannot predict 
the migraines and seems 



purchase a puppy for 
assistance training as soon 
as possible, Sava said she 
knows there will never be 
another Chelsea. 

"I'm scared," said 
Sava. "I feel very 
vulnerable, like I did 
before I got her." 

For now, however, 
Chelsea is her number one 
priority. In an effort to 
make Chelsea's final days 
as comfortable as possible, 
the South Shore Humane 
Society has set up a fiind 
to help Sava pay for the 
medical bills which have 
begun to accumulate since 
Chelsea became sick. 

Sava has vowed, 
however, that she will not 
allow Chelsea to suffer 
any unriecessary pain. 

"She is much too 
dignified," said Sava. 
"When the time comes, 
I'm going to have to love 
her enough to let her go. 
You have to love them 
(animals) enough to let 
them go. 

"I promised myself I 
wouldn't get emotional," 
she said, fighting off tears 
and apologizing for doing 
so. 

But her sadness, and 
her pain, are all too 
understandable. Chelsea 
is, after all, a very special 
dog. 

[Donations may be made 
payable to The South Shore 
Humane Society Inc., Box 
187, Braintree. MA 02184. 
Attn.: Chelsea's Medical 
Fund]. 



Quincys 
Yesterdays 



Rickover Lauds 
Fore River Built 
USS Long Beach 

Navy Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, an advocate of a 
nuclear Navy, said the Fore River-built nuclear fiigate USS 
Long Beach "marics an historic first step in the development 
of our nuclear powered surface fleet." 

Rickover, writing at sea " 



July 8-14, 

19<il 

32 Years Ago 



ft^om the Long Beach en route 
home from sea trials, said in a 
letter to Quincy Mayor 
AmeUo Delia Chiesa: 

"Once herpotentialities are 

understood the Long Beach 

may weU have the significance for surface naval warfare that 
the (nuclear submarine) Nautilus had for undersea warfare. 

"The ship made her design full power, in fact she ex- 
ceeded it" 

HEDGES HONORED 

Col. Charles W. Hedges of Quincy was awarded the 
Massachusetts Medal of Merit for his "outstanding leader- 
ship as a senior officer" in the State Air National Guard. 

Hedges, a fonner Norfolk County Sheriff and state sena- 
tor, received the medal from Gov. John A. Volpe during 
ceremonies at Otis Air Force Base on Cqje Cod. 
LANGUAGE PROBLEM 
It took aty Qeric John Gillis nearly an hour to accom- 
plish the three minute chore of filling out amaniage intention 
form for Harry Kari Bei^glund and Maria Rosa Una. Both of 
Houghs Neck. 

Seemed Berglund spoke only Sweedish, Una only Span- 
ish and Gillis only English — and the inteipieter wasn't 
really well versed in any of them. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Mayor John F. CoIUns of Boston assured Mayor Delia 
Chiesa that Boston was making eveiy eflFcMt to eliininate the 
smoke nuisance from the South Boston dumps that has been 
plaguing Squantum and North Quincy . . . Parking meter 
receipts for June were placed at $9,243.33, an increase of 70 
per cent over June of 1 960 . . . Atty. George V. Flavin of 78 
Hihna St., Monclair, was named to a $10,000 post on the 
State Pubhc Utilities Commission . . . WiUiam A. O'Connell 
observed his sixth year as chairman of the (Quincy Shipbuild- 
ing Committee . . . "Butterfield 8,"starTingElizabeth Taylor, 
Eddie Fisher and Laurence Harvey and "Where The Boys 
Are," with Connie Francis, was playing at the Art Theater . 
. . City Forester A. Warren Stewart reported that someone 
stole $100 worth of manure from the Forestry Department's 
stockpile on Penn St , South Quincy . . . Pfc. Michael Cleary, 
19, of 1 17 Doane St., Germantown, returned home after 26 
months with the army in Germany . . . Joseph N. Gildea, a 
candidate for the City Council from Ward 6, e;q>lained his 
plan for the merger of the Park and Recreation Boards at a 
meeting in the Monclair Men's Qubhouse . . . Sacco was at 
the "Back Room Barrel House Honky Tonk 88" at Louis 
Cafe 1269 Sea St, Hough Neck . . . David A, Mulholland of 
29 French St., North QuiiKy, became the first Quincy resi- 
dent selected for the Peace Corps when he was directed to 
leave for the Philippines July 29 . . . Chuck Roast was 49 
cents a pound at the Shop n' Save, 20 Indepeixlence Ave., 
South Quincy . . . The 1 7 1/2-acre Faxon Estate at the comer 
of Adams and Whitwell Sts. was sold to Sevenel, Iik., for 
development into 25 house lots . . . Quincy and three 
adjoining towns filed suit in Federal court in New Haven to 
prevent the state from taking over 10 mUes of Old Colony 
Railroad track for a rapid transit system . . . Paul A.M. Hunt 
of 57 Ellington Rd., Wollaston, was sworn in as an assistant 
district attorney for Massachusetts . . . Mayor Delia Chiesa 
ai^aled to residents to help police fight vandalism after a 
new $900 protective wire fence was torn down at Held and 
Wildes Quarry . . . Ace-In-The-Hole, a 31 -foot day cruiser 
built for Milton Yakus of Quincy, was the first boat launched 
at Boston Harbor Marina in 30 years. 



to lack Chelsea's self- 
dogs like Chelsea that confidence-and plans to 
help people with other ^^ 

disabilities). o^^s. UnibGcl W^y 



In Quincy, Sava said 
she and Chelsea have 
visited every public 




of Massachusetts Bay 

Something to feel gooJ abon* 




BUYU.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Quincy Helps Set New 
Daffodil Days Benefit Record 



Quincy volunteers, 
residents and businesses 
helped the South Shore 
unit of the American 
Cancer Society sell over 
120.000 daffodils and raise 
a record $61,000 during 
the recent Daffodil Days 
program in support of the 
Society's program of 
information, education and 
service in South Shore 
communities. 

Quincy turned in 
receipts of $26,550 from 
the sale of 5,310 bouquets 
of these "first flowers of 
spring" that stand as a 
symbol of the increasing 
hope made possible for 
cancer patients by 
research sponsored by the 
Cancer Society. 

"Once again people 
responded wonderfully and 
I want to thank the 
volunteers, residents, 
businesses, and schools in 
Quincy who helped make 
it possible," said Pauline 
Sweeney, long-time co- 
chair of the Daffodil Days 
program of the Unit. 
"Even in these difficult 
times and with a new snow 
storm to make things more 
difficult, the South Shore 
again set a record and led 
all 40 Cancer Society 
units in the State for the 
third year in a row." 

The South Shore Unit, 



with an area office in 
Stoughton, serves the 
communities of Braintree, 
Cohasset, Hingham, Hull, 
Milton, Norwell, Quincy, 
Scituate, and Weymouth. 
Volunteers carry out 
programs of professional 
education, referral and 
transportation in these 
towns. 

Sweeney singled out for 
special commendation 
employees of State Street 
South who raised a total of 
$3,500 in da^odil sales. 

She also cited the effort 
of the students and faculty 
of Quincy public schools 
who together raised 
$11,595 in a program 
headed by Pat Drew and 
Jean Healey, teachers at 
Central Middle School. 
Members of the Quincy 
High School Key Club 
sold daffodils at the 
Quincy Center MBTA 
Station; Esther Remick 
and Maureen Kelly sold at 
Shaw's supermarket. 
Quincy residents who 
helped deliver daffodils 
included Lisa Gusmini, 
Rosemary McLaughlin, 
Bill and Georgia Center, 
Paula McNally and 
Barbara Campbell. 

Major contributors 
noted by Sweeney 
included Arbella Mutual 
Insurance Company; 



Burgin Platner Insurance; 
Colonial Federal Savings 
Bank; Mary Cooney; The 
Cooperative Bank 
employees; Continental 
Cablevision, Curry 
Hardware, which provided 
flowers for Quincy 
Hospital patients; GTE 
Shareholders' employees; 
Harvard Community 
Health Plan; Interstate 
Distiributors employees; 
Lappen's Auto Supply; 
Margaret Madden; Manet 
Community Health Center; 
Charles Murphy, Inc.; 
National Fire Protection 
Association employees; 
Patriot Ledger employees; 
The Putnam Company 
employees; Quincy City 
Hall employees; Quincy 
Courthouse employees; 
Quincy Hospital 

employees; Quincy 
Municipal Credit Union 
employees; Quincy VNA; 
Carol Rizzo; Sacred Heart 
School students and 
teachers, headed by Lena 
O'Connell; South Shore 
Bank employees; South 
Shore 

Hematology/Oncology; 
and St Joseph's School. 

Pick-up sites in Quincy 
were at the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 
and Curry Hardware in 
West Quincy and North 
Quincy. 



5 Quincy Residents 
In NDA Honor Society 



Five Quincy residents 
were named by Notre 
Dame Academy to the 
Julienda Chapter of the 
National Honor Society at 
a candle-lighting 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



ceremony recently. 

They were: Amy 
Madden, Christine 
McDonnell, Tara Murphy, 
Mary O'Brien and Traci 
Anastas. 

Emily 
Middlebury 

Adam G. N. Moore of 
Squantum, received a 

Emily K. Moore, 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. 
Bachelor of Arts degree in 



Members were selected 
by a faculty council for 
meeting high standards of 

scholarship, service, 
leadership and character. 

Moore 
Graduate 

Italian from Middlebury 
College. 

She graduated Cum 

Laude with High Honors in 
Italian. 




FOUR QUINCY TRAFFIC supervisors were recently honored at a retirement party held 
at the Common Market in West Quincy. From left, Dolly Smith-Spirito (35 years); 
Nancy DiCarlo (23 years); Mary Morris (22 years); and Isabella Ollveri (20 years). 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Auxiliary Presents Quincy 
Hospital With $40,000 Check 



The Quincy Hospital 
Auxiliary annual luncheon 
was held recently at the 
Venezia Restaurant. 

Auxiliary President 
Marie Wilkinson presented 
Neil Stroman, chief 
operating officer of the 
hospital with a check for 
$40,000 which was raised 
through profits of the 
hospital gift shop. The 
shop is staff by volunteer 
members, and from other 
fundxaising activities. 



Peg Crehan, director of 
volunteer services, 
presented the auxiliary's 
annual scholarship to 
Matthew Lee, who has 
been a volunteer at the 
hospital and will attend 
Curry College. 

Officers presented by 
Nominating Committee 
Chairman Ardelle O'Brien 
were; Carol Herbai, 
president; Esther 
Grossman, first vice 
president; Janet Hassler, 



second vice president; 
Yolanda Romanelli, 
treasurer; Ilda DeMascio, 
recording secretary; Marie 
McKeever, corresponding 
secretary. 

Directors include Marie 
Wilkinson, three years, 
Marion DeSantis, two 
years, and Mildred Jacobs 
one year. Mary Sullivan 
chaired the luncheon and 
made favors for each 
person. 



Nine Members Initiated 
Into Quincy Emblem Club 



The Quincy Emblem 
Club welcomed nine new 
members at a recent 
meeting. 

They are: 

Ruth Doherty, Kay 



Ricks, Ursula Norton, 
Marguerite Houde, 
Mildred Holbert, Anna 

Ebbs, Margaret Houten, 
Barbara Capozzoli and 



Jeraldine Cleary. 

First Supreme Assistant 
Marshall Sue McGregor 
presided over the 
initiation. 



Holly Rendle Colgate Graduate 



Holly Rendle, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Rendle of Wollaston, 
recently received a 
bachelor of arts degree 
from Colgate University in 
Hamilton, N.Y. 





A graduate of North 
Quincy High School, she 
concentrated in sociology- 
anthropology at the 
university and is now a 
certified secondary school 
teacher. 

While at Colgate, she 



was captain of the varsity 
volleyball team, as well as 
a member of the Lambda 
Alpha Society and Colgate 
Dance Theatre. Miss 
Rendle was also named to 
the Dean's List each of her 
last three semesters. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



|SnUSH120-SEATEf 

DBCOVODNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOUGHT TO BE 

AMELIA'S. 

The sasct's out 

E functton room at Amelia's 
I has become one of Boston's 
I most popular spots for wed 
dings, shower, corporate 
rrwetings, and get togethers 
of aO k^s We feature an 
I extensive menu at affordable 
prices We overlook Manna 
I Bay and the Boston skyline 
We'd like to nvake your next 
function really fly. 

II Please eaQ 617471 1453. 



i 



MELIA 



LVctoiy Rd. No Quincy. t^l 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



BEAUTY & SKINCABE 



ELECTRIC BEACH 
Tanning Center 

11 Parkingway 

Quincy Center 

472-5256 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



INVITATIONS & FAVORS 



15% off on Invitations 

E & T CERAMICS & 
PRINTING 

516 SEA STREET -QUINCV 

(617) 47M107 

Ask about our Custom Made Favors & 
Centerpieces for all Occasions 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography , 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6886 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



C^OlSOn R"e Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The ColettI Family Al - Dave - Mark* 

730 HANCOCK ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



J 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



Thig^lttcy Stttt will continue to p| 
tographs with engagcwient aunouncemeots as it 
aiwa)^ }aa. 

The Son will also continae lo use in wedding 
annottncements the names of all members of tlJB 
wedding party including maid or matron of bonca'^, 
best man, parents, bridesmaids, ushers* flower ' 
girls and ringbearers, etc. 

We invite engaged couples to submit their 
ph<«os with their announcements-and when sub- 
mitting flieir wedding photo to iaclnde a complete 
listing of the wedding pany. 

Black and white phota^ are preferred. The Sun 
can convert most color photc« to black and white 
for publication but the photo loses some clarity in 
the process. 

We suggest that when you have your engage- 
ment photo taken, you request the studio to send a 
copy to The Sun with the reminder that The Sun is 
continuing its policy of publishing engagement 
phcHos. 

The Sun also publishes articles and photos of 
wedding anuiversaries beginning with the 25Ui 
anniversary. 

And, as in the past, there is no charge. 



Scholarship Recipients 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 



\ 




KATHLEEN McDONALD (right) from North Quincy 
High School received an annual scholarship from The 
Co-operative Bank for academic excellence and 
outstanding citizenship. She is a member of Students 
Against Drunk Driving, the French Club and Amnesty 
International, she Is also listed with Who's Who Among 
American High School Students and the U.S. 
Achievement Academy. Annette Spring (left), Assistant 
Treasurer from The Co-operative Bank, presented the 
award. 




ERIN PELLETIER (left) of Quincy is the recipient of an 
annual scholarship from The Co-operative Bank. 
Pelletier, a student at The Woodward School, is a 
member of the National Honor Society, has served as 
class officer, and also tutors fellow students. Doris Baker 
(right) Assistant Vice President from The Co-operative 
Bank, presented the award. 



*|»»^, !!'^«.»*«, ^ 




JENNIFER KELLEY (left) of Quincy High School 
recieved a scholarship from The Co-operative Bank for 
academic excellence and outstanding citezenship. Kelley 
Is a member of the Q-Club and the junior and senior 
prom committees, she is also a member of the award 
winning cheerleading squad and is involved in the 
Students Against Domestic Violence program. Joanne 
Gavoni (right), an assistant branch manager from the Co- 
operative Bank, presented the award. 

Michael Kellj, Pamela Carroll 
Parents Of Daughter 

Mr. Michael Kelly and and Mrs. Richard J. Carroll 

Sr. of Lynn, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph P. Kelly of 
Westwood. 



Ms. Pamela Carroll of 
Quincy are parents of a 
daughter, Alexander 
Simone Kelly, bom June 
19 at St. Elizabeths 
Medical Cfenter in Boston. 
Grandparents are Mr. 



SAVE GAS 

AND MONEY.. 

SHOP LOCALLY 



Social 




MR. and MRS. ROBERT REIDY 

(Paul Gladstone photo) 

Susan Megnia Wed 
To Robert Reidy 



Susan M. Megnia, 
daughter of Mrs. Robert 
Megnia of Quincy, was 
recently married to Robert 
M. Reidy. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Dennis 
LeFort of Quincy. 

The double ring 
candlelight ceremony was 
conducted at St. Boniface 
Church in Germantown 
and co-officiated by Rev. 
DeVeer and Rev. 
Alexander Wyse and Rev. 
Gregory Wyse, both 
cousins of the mother of 
the bride. A reception 
followed at La Casa 
Bianca in Canton. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her brothers, 
Robert Megnia and John 
Megnia, both of 
Marshfield 

Cahe Craig of Hull 
served as Matron of Honor 
for her sister. 

Bridesmaids were Mary 
Megnia-Connors and Jodi 
Megnia, both of Quincy, 
sisters of the bride; and 
Dianne Holler, Cheryl 
Crispo and Maureen 
Keeley, all of Quincy. 
Hower Girl was Michelle 



Megnia, niece of the bride. 

Donald Reidy of 
Marshfield served as Best 
Man for his brother. 

Ushers were Jim 
Megnia of Quincy and 
Joey Megnia of 
Somerville, brothers of the 
bride; Matt Higgins of 
Quincy, Jack Outerbridge 
of Braintree, Bob 
Kozlowski of Quincy and 
Dominic Camillo of 
Quincy. 

The bride, a 1984 
graduate of Quincy High 
School and 1989 graduate 
of Quincy College, is 
employed by the law firm 
of Meehan, Boyle & 
Cohen, P.C, in Boston. 

The groom, a 1985 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School, is employed 
by The Boston Globe. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Hawaii, the 
newlyweds are living in 
South Weymouth. 



Kussell Edward's 




JAMES BURKE and SUSAN KICHLER 

Susan Kichler Engaged 
To James Burke 



Mr. and Mrs. John A. 
Kichler of Hull announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Susan Marie, to 
James G. Burke. He is the 
son of Mr. Thomas G. 
Burke of Quincy and the 
late Mary E. Burke. 

Miss Kichler is a 
graduate of Hull High 
School and Sabina's 
Beauty Academy of 



Quincy. 

Mr. Burke, a graduate 
of Quincy Vocational- 
Technical High School, 
attended Quincy Junior 
College and Northeastern 
University. He is employed 
by Building Technology 
Engineers Inc. of Boston. 

A fall wedding is 
planned. 



Quincy Catholic Club 
Awards $1500 In Scholarships 



The Quincy Catholic 
Club recently awarded six 
high school seniors 
scholarship certificates 
totaUng $1500 at a Mass 
in St. John's Church. 

The Rev. William 
McCarhty, pastor of St. 
John's and club chaplain, 
was celebrant. 

Those receiving 
scholarships were: 

Maryellen Eddy, a 
recent North Quincy High 



graduate; Dennis 
Lawrence of Quincy High 
School; Cindy Buonopane, 
Lincoln Sudbury Regional 
High School; Joshua 
Eggleston, Falmouth High 
School; Brandon Gibbons, 
Thayer Academy in 
Braintree; Monica Shea, 
Milton High School. 

A summary of each 
student's interests and 
accomlishments was 
prevented by the chairman. 




Summer Clearance 

25-50% Off Selected Items 

Think of Us for Showers and Weddings! 

OPEN YEAR ROUND 

Open Tues.-Sat. 10-5, Closed Sundays & Mondays 

853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 ^S^ 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by tHiilding a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 






mSURANCE Al';F,NrV.IN{ 

"Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later" 

OUR NEW LOCATION IS: 
62 DERBY STREET, HINGHAM. MA 

PO BOX 522 ACCORD STATION 02018-0522 

Rear BIdg., behind SHEARSON & LEHMAN 

(OFF RTE 3, EXIT 15 NEXT TO HINGHAM PLAZA* 

TEL: (617)740-4070 
COME BY AND VISIT OUR NEW OFFICE 



\ full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 f 

TUES&THURS ■ ^ 

Men's Special $13.00 j 

WEDNESDAY ' 

Perm Special 

Starting at $42.00 „ .,^. . .^ , ,^„ 

^ Narl Tipping & Overlay $60 

All specials Include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 

redi<:en KMS ^^M^ pfrxmitcihell ymatrix 

472-1060 

\ Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Spanish Music Concert 
At First Parish Sunday 



Soprano Lila Deis and 
pianist Douglas Riva will 
perform 19th century 
Spanish music Sunday at 3 
p.m. at United First Parish 
Church (Church of the 
Presidents), 1306 Hancock 
St., Quincy Center. 

The concert is part of 
the Presidents Church 
, Summer Music Festival 
produced by the 
Scarborough Chamber 
Players. Works by Rossini, 
Mompou, Granados, 
Albeniz, de falla, Turina, 
Vives and Luna will be 
performed. 

Deis has sung both here 
and abroad with orchestra, 
in recital, chamber music 
and opera. She has 
appeared with many 
ensembles, such as the 
Stuttgart Philharmonic, 
Orchestre de la Suisse 
Romande, the Oratorio 
Society of New York, 
Boston Masterworks 
Chorale, the Dallas 
Symphony and others. 
Deis, who has also 
appeared in the Dunbarton 
Concert Series in 




DOUGLAS RIVA and LILA DEIS 



Washington, D.C. the 
Philips Collection and the 
National Gallery of Art, is 
artistic director and co- 
founder of the Rockport 
Chamber Music Festival, 
now in its 12th season. 

Riva received his 
musical education at the 
JuUiard School in New 



p — CLIP 4 SAVE 8€— — — — — — — — -^ 

Sutnmerfest V3 

Free Summer Concerts 
Our 1 1th Year 

All performances will be held at 
the Ruth Gordon Ampitheatre at 
Merrymount Park on Wednesday 
evenings, 7 PM - 9 PM 

July 7 Quincy Choral Society 

Broadway tunes and 
popular music 

July 14 Majic 

Top forty, standard 
oldies 

July 21 Continentals 

Big Band Sound 

July 28 Obsession 

Top forties, musical 
variety 

Aug, 4 Reminisants 

Fifties-sixties 
musical variety 

Aug. 11 Crossroads 

Easy listening 
light rock 

Aug. 18 Navy Show Band 

Newport, R.I. 

Aug. 25 Yankee Jack 

Country-Western 

Sept. 1 Army Show Band 

Fort Devens, ^4A 

Sponsored by the 
Quincy South Shore 
Cultural Commission Inc. 



Joseph J. LaRaia 
President 




'Sailor's Joy' To Open 
Crane Storytelling Series July 13 



York and at the Academia 
Marshall in BarceloDa. He 
has discovered 

unpublished works for 
piano by Granados and has 
performed at the White 
House and in many parts 
of the United States, 
including Carnegie Hall 
and Town Hall in New 
York. Riva has been 

soloist at International 
Festivals in Segovia and 
Barcelona, has toured 
Spain for Jeunesses 
Musicales, and has 
recorded for Centaur 
Records, Dial Discos and 
the Musical Heritage 
Society. 

Tickets are $7, $5 for 
children and seniors. Those 
attending may also 
participate in 

Cultureshare, a special 
program offering free 
admission to any adult 
who brings a child. For 
more information or 
reservations caU 328-0677. 



New England storyteller 
and folk singer Jim 
Douglas will present 
"Sailor's Joy" Tuesday, 
July 13 at 7 p.m. at the 
Thomas Crane Public 
Library, Quincy Square. 

His program of stories 
and songs of sailors, 
pirates and whales, which 
will launch the library's 
six week series of 
storytelling concerts, will 
be enjoyed by adults and 
children age 5 and older. 

A resident of 
Sturbridge, Douglas has 
spent the last 16 years 
sharing stories and songs 
of New England's land and 
sea with audiences 
throughout the Northeast. 
He has made yearly 
appearances at schools, 
libraries, historical 
societies, coffee houses 
and folk festivals. He has 
also worked as a 
shantyman on the Hudson 
River Sloop Clearwater 
and has been a frequent 
performer at Mystic 
Seaport and Old Sturbridge 
Village. 

Douglas currently has 
three books and six 




JIM DOUGLAS 

recordings available. His American Library 

most recent recording Association, and his 

received a 1992 Notable newest book is being used 

Recording Award from the in area schools. 



Arts, Crafts Camp 
Registration Underway 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch, Director of 
Recreation, aimounces the 
Quincy Recreation 
Department's Arts and 
Crafts camp will be held 
from July 12 through July 
16, or August 16 through 
August 20, between the 
hours of 8:30 a.m. and 
12:30 p.m. at the Dawes 
Memorial Estate. 

The camp is open to 
boys and girls ages 8 



through 12. The cost of 
the camp is $30. No 
previous experience in arts 
and crafts is necessary. 

The camp is under the 
direction of Aim Howie, a 
professional arts and crafts 
instructor for area 
agencies. The camp is for 
youngsters with beginner 
and intermediate skill 
levels. Campers will be 
instructed on simple 
projects that may include 



decorations, arrangements, 
paintings as well as ribbon 
and lace work. 

Registration will take 
place at the Recreation 
Office, 100 Southern 
Artery, between 9 a.m. and 
4 p.m. Registration is 
taken on a first come first 
serve basis. More 

information can be 
obtained by calling the 
Recreation Office at 376- 
1386. 



Recreation 
Barry Welch 
the Quincy 



'History Hikes Camp' 
To Begin July 12 



Director 

announces 

Recreation 



Oar PunHe iXnosaur 
Delivers Balloons 




690 Hancock ST. • Quincy 
773-0690 




Department's "History 
Hikes" Camp, will be held 
Mondays July 12, 19 and 
August 2,9 between 8 a.m. 
and noon. 

The camp will be run 
by Steve CantelH, Lincoln 
Hancock school teacher. 

The camp program will 
include walking the 
Patriot's Trail in Quincy 
and the Freedom Trail in 
Boston. 



' CLIP & SAVE K 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



The camp is one of the 
self-supporting summer 
programs offered by the 
Recreation Department 
and is for boys and girls 
entering grades 5, 6 and 7. 

The cost is $34. 
Registration is conducted 
weekdays 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
at 100 Southern Artery as 
long as openings still exist. 
Additional information can 
be obtained by calling 
375-1386. 

Free Concert 
At Memorial 

Congregational 

The Milton Band will 
hold a free concert 
Monday, July 12 at 7 p.m. 
on the lawn at Memorial 
Congregational Church, 
Newbury Ave. and 
Sagamore St., North 
Quincy. 

The event will be held 
inside Memorial Hall if it 
rains. 



DARE Program Expanded 
To Include 7th Graders 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



The D.A.R.E. program, a 
partnership between the 
Quincy Pubhc Schools and 
the Police Department, 
has recently been 
expanded to include grade 
seven students 

The focus of this 
program 'S smoking 



prevention and the effect 
of the media on our 
decision-making. 

The seventh grade peer 
leaders at Central Middle 
School as well as the other 
three middle underwent 
two full days of training, 



The parking meters in 
the Vane St. Parking Lot 
in Norfolk Downs, North 
Quincy have been changed 
from a two hour limit to a 
five hour limit at a rate of 
5 cents an hour. 

The change was made 
through the collaborative 
efforts of Ward 6 City 
Councillor Bruce Ayers, 
Traffic Engineer Jack 
Gillon, and North Quincy 
Business Association 
President Joe Doran. 

Ayers said he initiated 
the change to help 
increase the number of 
patrons in the North 
Quincy business area 
while also providing a 
parking option for the 
merchants. 

"Being a small 
businessman myself, I 
realize how important 
businesses are to an area 
and it is important to try to 
meet the needs of both 
patrons and merchants," 
Ayers said. 

Jed Scolnick 

Loomis 
Chaffee Grad 

Jed Scolnick, son of 
Stephen and Sara Scolnick 
of 2001 Marina Drive, 
North Quincy, recently 
graduated from The 
Loomis Chaffee School in 
Windsor, Conn. 

Scolnick served as vice 
president of the Asian 
Oub at the school. He will 
anend Tulane University. 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



SPONSOR 



Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door witti personal- 
ized, measurable adverti- 
sing to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usually by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood. We tell them all 
about your business. 
Interested? Call tor more 
details: 

Barbara Nawrot MendAz 
479-2587 



^/&lSI|C 



provided by Prevention 
Resources, to learn the 
harmful effects of 
smoking, why some teens 
decide to smoke and 
techniques for saying "no." 
They will visit fourth 
graders in the elementary 
schools and give them 
facts about smoking's 
hamihil effects and discuss 
ways to deal with peer 
pressure. 

The five hour limit on , T^^^^ ^^'^ /^ peer 

the parking meters will 'eaders at Central wortang 

also help to prevent people ""^^^ '^' guidance of 

from paiidng in the Im and *'^^*^^^ ^^"^ Cammack. 



Vane St. Parking Lot 
Meter Costs Reduced 




walking to the MBTA 
station, which was not the 
intended use for the lot, 
according to Ayers. 



Besides working with 
the fourth graders, they 
will be working with their 
seventh grade peers. 



SEVENTH GRADE peer leaders at Central Middle School. Front row from left: Adam 
Knowles, Matt Kisiel, Mike Stockdale and Michelle Boncek. Middle row: Katelyn 
Sweetson, Alma Batac, Nicole St. Pierre, Ed Smith, Bryan Linsky. Back row: Christie 
Myers, Erin Barry, teacher Jane Cammack, and Alan Lam. 



See US about 

a personal loan 

ibda^ before 

youirindim 

forfi 

i; 




Why pay more for a personal loan when 
you can get a great deal at Quincy Savings: our 
11.75% fixed rate personal loan, good when you 
have your payment 
automatically trans- 
ferred from any 
Quincy Savings 
deposit account* 

Use it for bill 
consolidation to lower 
your monthly pay- 
ments, the summer 
vacation you've always 
dreamed of, or that 
new personal computer for your children. 
Borrow a minimum of $2,500 to a maximum of 
$10,000 for a term of up to 48 months. Since 
most loans are approved within 24 hours, you 




can be er\joying lower loan payments before 

you know it. 

But huny, because a low personal 
loan rate like this 
won't last forever. 
We've got $5 million 
to lend to people 
like you who are 
looking for low 
rates. So call 
Quincy Savings at 
(617) 471-3500 and 
ask for a consumer 
loan representative, 

or rush in to your nearest branch office for an 

appUcation. 

*The rate is 1% higher without an automatic transfer from 
a Quincy Savings account. 




Quincy Savings Bank 

Braintree, Brockton, Hanover, Hingham, 

Marshfield, Norwell, Quincy, Scituate, Plymouth 

(617)471^3500 • Member FDIC/DIF 



Page 10 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Celebrating The 4th, Quincy Style 




AN APPROPRIATE GREETING Is carried along the Merrymount Fourth of July 
Parade route celebrating the nation's 217th birthday. 



ARRIVING IN STYLE at the Adams Shore Independence Day Cookout at Arthur 
Boyson Park are Andrew Paine, left, twin brother Brendan, right, and Daniel Rogers. 
The twins' mom puUed them to the festivities. 




PATRIOTIC DALAMATIANS, from left, Kathleen Gorman, Sean Walsh, Monica 
Broughton and Scott Gorman participate in the Merrymount Fourth of July Parade. 



LAURA JANOWITCH, age nine, was the winner of the Ward 2 Field Day bicycle 
contest at Fore River Field. 








CHILDREN DRESSED AS dinosaurs io a boat was part of Squantum Yacht Club's MOLLY ROSE enjoys a pony ride as Nolyn Gosselin guides "Trotts" during the 

Jurassic Park them float in the Squantum Fourth of July Parade. The float was a Adams Shore Neighborhood Association's Independence Day cookout. 

take-off of the summer's hit movie. 



r*> HEALTH STOP '" 
^^ BRAINTREE 



Health Stop./Braintree 

759 Granite Street 

Braintree, MA 02184 

(617) 848-1950 



Your Neighborhood Doctor's Office 



COMPLETE FAMILY 
HEALTH SERVICES 

• On Site Lab & X-Ray 

• Continuing Care for Hypertension, 
Diabetes, Asthma & Allergies 

• Minor Emergency Care 

• Women's Health Care 



Now Participating in 
Pilgrim Health Care 

and 
Tufts Managed Care 

David Egilman M.D., MPH Board Certified in 
Internal and Preventive/Occupational Medicine 



Mon-Fri 8 am-7 pm • Sat 8 am-1 pm 

No Appointment Necessary 

We submit to Blue Shield, Medicare, 

Medicaid and other major Insurance plans 



Qulncy Health Stop Patients: 
You may continue your medical care at 

Health Stop/Braintree, 
where your records are now available. 



Quincy Sun Photos by Tom Gorman 



JAMES A. SHANNON 

ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION 
OF HIS LAW OFFICE TO 

PRESIDENTS PLACE 

1250 HANCOCK STREET, 

SUITE 802N 

QUINCY, MA 02169 

TELEPHONE: (617) 472-4547 
FACSIMILE: (617) 479-0006 



Thursday, Julj 8, 1993 Quincj Sun Page 11 



Thomas Fabrizio Candidate 
For Re-election In Ward 4 



Ward 4 Councillor 
Thomas A. Fabrizio 
announces he is a 
candidate for reelection to 
a third term. 

Speaking before 275 
supporters recently at the 
Common Market Place, 
Fabrizio cited 

accomplishments made in 
South and West Quincy 
over the past three and a 
half years, and the 
upcoming challenges and 
goals for the ward's 
immediate and long range 
future. 

Fabrizio noted his key 
role in the 1990 7(M) 
West Quincy rehabilitation 
project that successfully 
replaced the overburdened 
antiquated neighborhood 
sewer system and eased a 
long standing flooding 
problem that had plagued 
the area. 

He said he successfully 
prevented the creation of a 
water transfer station in 
South Quincy. Fabrizio 
worked with neighbors and 
convinced his City 
Council colleagues the 
high impact site would 
adversely affect the 
largely residential area. 

Fabrizio said he also 
established an order to 
prevent illegal dumping in 
the former West Quincy 
Landfill. He is a leading 
proponent to turn the site 
into a municipal recreation 
facility and a golf course. 

In 1990, Fabrizio said 
he had the former 
Antonello ironworks site 
on Williard St. rezoned. 
The zoning change was 
designed to allow the 
neighborhood to have 
broad input on future 
development at the site. 
Later, Georgia based 
Home Depot was allowed 
to develop the site under 
strict conditions set forth 




and 
the 

his 



TOM FABRIZIO 

after neighborhood 
meetings. 

At the time, the Quincy 
Citizens Association 
recognized Fabrizio's 
efforts, proclaiming, 
"Fabrizio has heard and 
recognized community 
concerns and has come up 
with measures to assure 
that the Home Depot 
project will not only be a 
financial asset to the city, 
but also that the 
neighborhood will be 
improved, that 

employment opportunities 
will be available for local 
residents and that the 
city's interest won't vanish 
after the permit is issued. 
This the group added is 
certainly a break through 
for the voters of Quincy. 
this councillor (Fabrizio) 
has proven himself to be a 
thinking representative of 
the people of Quincy." 

As Chairman of the 
City Council's Education 
Committee, Fabrizio said 
he was able to uniquely 
assist Ward 4 through the 
recently approved Capital 
Project. In South Quincy. 
the abandoned Lincoln 
School has been leveled 
and construction is under 
way at the site for a new 
early childhood center that 
will reheve overcrowding 
at the Lincoln Hancock 



School. The Charles A. 
Bemazzani School, which 
is located in Ward 3 but 
serves many West Quincy 
school children will also 
be expanded 
modernized under 
project. 

Fabrizio told 
supporters: "Together we 
have worked long and hard 
on issues of importance 
both large and small. Yet 
despite these many 
accomplishments there are 
still many challenges that 
lie ahead." 

Fabrizio noted that a 
new Ward 4 Community 
Center will be included in 
the new Early Childhood 
School in South Quincy. 
He also spoke on his 
proposed site plan review 
ordinance which would 
establish community 
standards for development 
pertaining to issues of 
traffic, aesthetics and 
overall neighborhood 
impact. Fabrizio pledged 
to continue his 
commitment to public 
safety. He has worked 
closely with the Police 
Department on crime 
prevention issues and has 
asked that the city's 
ambulance contractor 
station an ambulance in 
Ward 4. He said he was 
also instrumental in 
replacing Engine 5 in 
West Quincy with a brand 
new fire engine. 

He thanked the Ward 4 
neighborhood association 
for their cooperation with 
his monthly community 
meetings. 

Fabrizio, 38, is 
employed by the 
Department of Social 
Services in the Family 
Resource Unit. He and his 
wife Kathy (Graham) are 
the parents of two 
daughters. 



Joseph Zooa Graduates 
The Lawrenceville School 



Joseph John Zona, IV, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Zona of Emerald St., 
Quincy, recently graduated 
from The Lawrenceville 
School, an independent 
secondary school in 
Lawrenceville, N.J. 

Zona was assistant 
captain of the varsity 
hockey team and was 
captain of the varsity 
baseball team, winning the 
Ronald A. Hulit Baseball 
Award for his contributions 



to the team. He was also 
vice president of his house. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 

471 -31 or 






Always Buying 
New&QM 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Nfaple St., 
Qmncy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Gomideie Line (tf Supplies 






GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



SERVICE 



M09IU 



AU10 HOME BUSINESS 
• OUDIOLTS INS. AILED 
I* LOCKS REKETED 
DOOR CLOSERS 
, • PANIC HAR0WAS4E 
'• AUTO KETS FITTED 



VlS^r OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRY. QUINCY 

472-2177 



DRIVERS WANTED 



Deliver The Quincy Sun to 

news outlets and carriers 

on Wednesday afternoons. 

Must have own car. 

Familiarity with 

Quincy streets a plus. 

Call Bob at 471-3100 



Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival 
Biggest In 23 Years 



This year's Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival 
to be held July 15-16-17 
will be the biggest in its 
23 year history. 

"We will have more 
activities this year than 
ever before," said Kathy 
Missell, chairman of the 
Quincy Center Business 
and Professional 

Association Promotions 
Committee. 

The event will be held 
on Hancock St. which will 
be closed off to vehicular 
traffic between Granite 
and School Sts. 

Activities are scheduled 
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Thursday, July 15 and 
Friday, July 16 and from 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, 
July 17. 

Nearly 50 Quincy 
Center member stores and 
businesses will be 
participating with the 
accent on good family fun 
and good shopping buys, 
said Missell. 

Two stages will be set 



up on Hancock St. where exhibition, pony rides, a 

entertainers and musical miniature golf course, 

units will perform. children's ferns wheel and 

Musical units will merry-go-round, 

include the Roma Band, moonwalk, dunk tank, a 

the Quincy Alumni Band, magician and clowns, 

the Yardrockers Blues marionette puppets, and a 

Band, and the Trailside visit by Bart Simpson. 

Coffee House Bands. There will also be many 

Among the many booths including those of 

features will the Mime the Navy Shipbuilding 

Circus, the Scarborough Museum, National Park 

Chamber Players, New Services and Quincy 

England Wildlife animal Tourism, Quincy 

show. Young People's Recycling, Quincy 

Theatre, Norfolk County Hospital and Quincy 

drug sniffing dog Visiting Nurses 

demonstration, Quincy Association, 

firefighters demonstration, "It will really be three 

Multicultural Food fair, full days of family fun," 

greek dancers, karate said Missell. 

Cara McNally On BC Dean's List 



Cara M. McNally, 
daughter of Thomas A. and 
Mary T. McNally of 
Division St., North Quincy, 
received academic honors 
at Boston College by 
making the university's 



Dean List for the spring 
semester 1993. 

She received a bachelor 
of science degree in 
nursing at the college's 
recent commencement. 



Agnitti 

INSURANCE 

HOME •AUTO 'BUSINESS 




CALL FOR A QUOTE ON 
PROraJt P»ISURANCE 

COVERAGE AT 
COMPETTITVE PRICES 

770-0123 




TOTAL FAMILY 
DENTISTRY 

Denis J. Condon, D.D.S. 

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME! 




m\ DentJ 



BLUE CROSS 
& BLUE SHIELD 



QUINCY-MILTON 
DENTAL ASSOCIATES 

Saturday & Evening 
Appointments Available 

479-9191 

611 Adams Street, Quincy 

Initial Visil FREE Includes Exam. 
X-RaijS. and Consultation. 




Join the Am! Children 3 thru 12 

for a summer filled with 

activities and events. 

AT/O CAMP CAMPS NATURE C APERS 

Elementary School Children Pre-Schoolers 

SUMMERTIME ACADEMICS CHESS CLUB TUTORING - ALL SUBJECTS 



COMPUTER CAMP 

ATrniTT<^T ART CLUB 



SCIENCK WIZARnRY KTNDEROARTEN 

WATRRCQLOR 



TEEN ART gjVSS 

Beecbwood 



Ooiiiiiiiimiliy life Cmto 



225 FENNO STREET - QUINCY 
471-5712 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Obituaries 



Thomas J. Gallagher, 71 

Retired Machinist, WWII Veteran 

A funeral Mass for High School. He later 

lived in St. Gregory's 
Parish, Dorchester, for 36 
years before moving to 
Wollaston three years ago. 

After leaving the Navy, 
he worked a few years in a 
shipyard as a machinist- 
welder and then worked at 
Westinghouse 13 years 
before joining the MBTA. 

He was a eucharistic 
minister at St. Gregory's. 
He was a member of Local 
264, a fourth-degree 
member of Bishop 
Cheverus Knights of 
Columbus Assembly and a 
member of the Lower 
Mills Council. Knights of 
Columbus. 

Mr. Gallagher is 
survived by his wife of 45 
years, Barbara C. (Bohan) 
Gallagher; a son, Thomas 



Thomas J. Gallagher, 71, 
of Wollaston, a retired 
machinist for the MBTA 
and a World War II Navy 
veteran, was celebrated 
Tuesday in St. Gregory's 
Church, Dorchester. 

Mr. Gallagher died July 
1. 

He was a machinist for 
the MBTA for 23 years 
before retiring in 1982. 

For five years he had 
been active with the 
Belleau Wood (CVL-24) 
Association of Shipmates. 
He served on the aircraft 
carrier in the South Pacific 
during the war. 

A shipfitter on the 
Belleau Wood, he was on 
board when it was hit by a 
Japanese kamikaze plane 
and several of his 



shipmates were killed or J. Gallagher, Jr. of 



injured. 

Mr. Gallagher was a 
charter member and past 
commander of the St. 
Mark's Veterans of 



Plymouth; two sisters, 
Anne Nasuti of Quincy and 
Margaret Darhng of South 
Boston; and a grandson. 
Burial was in St. Mary's 



Foreign Wars post in Cemetery, Canton. 
Dorchester. Funeral arrangements 

Bom in Winchester, he were by the Alfred D. 

was raised in Canton and Thomas Funeral Home, 

graduated from Canton Milton. 

Nancy Rogers, 60 



A funeral Mass for 
Nancy Carol (Salvaggi) 
Rogers, 60, a homemaker 
and lifelong Quincy 
resident; was celebrated 
Tuesday at Sacred Heart 
Church, North Quincy. 

Mrs. Rogers died July 1 
at Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 

She was bom, raised 
and educated in Quincy. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Arthur M. 
Rogers; a son, Ronald A. 
Rogers of Quincy; a 
daughter. Dona Dyer of 
Enfield, Ct.; three brothers, 
Alexander Spere of 
Quincy, John Speredelozzi 
of Brockton and William 
Salvapgi of Abington; 



three sisters, Josepn 
Fiorini of Avon, Janette 
Lawyer of Quincy and 
Dorothy DiRamio of 
Taunton; and five 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hamel, 
Wickens and Troupe 

Funeral Home, 26 Adams 
St., Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, 
Oncology Research, in 
care of Dr. Robert W. 
Carey, Treasury Office, 
P.O. Box 135, Boston, 
02114. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 



"When you get where you are 
going, where will you be?" This 
is a leading question that often 
is very provocative for people 
willing to do a little soul search- 
ing. 

Some people answer: "I'm 
not going anywhere any more." They assume they are 
going nowhere in life, that they're standing still. But the 
fact is we're ahways moving in some direction. From the 
moment of conception we are moving on a course that 
carries us through life to death, and we trust, to something 
beyond. 

There may be times when we might want to stop the 
world and get off, but life moves on, even then we think we 
are standing still. 

Actually, none of us are created to stand still in life. We 
are created to grow and develop, not just in the beginning 
of life, but through to the very end...Too many Christian 
adults assume that they've done all the growing that's 
expected of them. "Howmuchmoregrowing am Isupposed 
to do?" Perhaps tfie t>est answer is found In Paul's ansv/er 
to the church at Ephesus: "until we all attain the unity of 
the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature 
manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of 
Christ, so that we may no longer b>e children." (4: 13, 14) 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust' 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



Michael F. Kelly, 77 

Former DPW Deputy Commissioner; 
Retired Business Manager 



John J. Swanson, 75 

Handwriting Expert, Lecturer 

A funeral Mass for John Air Force, he pursued the 



A funeral Mass for 
Michael F. Kelly, 77, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
July 3 in Star of the Sea 
Church. 

Mr. Kelly died June 30 
at home after a long 
illness. 

He worked for 20 years 
as a business manager for 
Howard Needles 

Engineering in Boston 
before retiring 11 years 
ago. He previously worked 
for the Post Office in 
Chestnut Hill. 

Active in politics, he 
was an administrative 
assistant to former Gov. 
Foster Furcolo and .served 
as a deputy commissioner 
in the state Department of 
Public Works. 

He served in World 
War II with the Army Corp 
of Engineers. During 
fighting on the island of 
Guinea, north of Australia, 
he was hit by shrapnel and 
was in and out of hospitals 
for five years. A leg injury 
continued to plague him 
for the rest of his life. 

Bom in Boston, he grew 

up in Roxbury and was a 

graduate of Roxbury 

Memorial High School. 

A eucharistic minister. 



he distributed communion 
for patients at 
Massachusetts General 
Hospital in Boston. 



J. Swanson, 75, of 
Weymouth, formerly of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
July 3 in St. Clare's 
Church, Braintree. 

Mrs. Swanson died June 



He played baseball with 29 at South Shore Hospital 



his children and 
grandchildren in his yard 
and often attended their 
games. 

He enjoyed traveling, 
singing, reading and taking 
care of his lawn. 

He was a member of 
the Nickerson Disabled 
American Veterans Post in 
Squantum. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Norma (Garcia) 
Kelly; a son, Michael J. 
Kelly of Pennsylvania; 
three daughters, Kathleen 
Minukas and Marie 
Valenti, both of Quincy, 
and Theresa Thomas of 
Marshfield; four sisters, 
Mary Williams, Alice 
O'Brien, Katherine 
Keaveny, all of 
Dorchester, and Helen 
Aheam of Quincy; seven 
grandchildren, and many 
nephews and nieces. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Michael J. Walsh Sr., 75 

Machinist, Army Veteran 



A funeral Mass for 
Michael J. Walsh Sr., 75, 
of Quincy, a retired 
machinist, was celebrated 
Wednesday in St. Ann's 
Church, Wollaston. 

Mr. Walsh died July 2 
at home. 

He was a machinist for 
General Devices Company 
for 10 years before retiring 
in 1979. 

He was a past 
commander and member 
of VFW Thaddeus 
Kusciuszko Post 2091 for 
mote than 30 years. 

He was an Army 
veteran of World War II. 

Born in Boston, he 
lived in Dorchester, South 
Boston and Hyde Park 
before moving to Quincy 
23 years ago. He 
graduated from Hyde Park 
High School in 1935. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Marie E. (Allen) 



Walsh; four sons, Peter J. 
Walsh of Pembroke, 
Michael J. Walsh of 
Sharon, Robert E. Walsh 
of Portsmouth, N.H., and 
David W. Walsh of South 
Dartmouth; three 
daughters, Mary Jane 
Davis of Quincy, 
Margurite R. Sacramona of 
Kingston, and Cheryl M. 
Walsh of Quincy; one 
brother, William Walsh of 
Hyde Park; 19 

grandchildren and 18 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in the 
veterans' section of Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 247 

Commonwealth Ave., 
Boston, MA 02116. 



in Weymouth after a brief 
illness. 

Owner of J.J. Swanson 
Professional Associates in 
Weymouth, he was a 
document examiner, 
lecturer, teacher and 
author on handwriting 
analysis and forgery 
detection. He traveled 
widely as a lecturer. 

Certified by the 
Graphoanalysis Society in 
Chicago, he was a 
consultant to banks, credit 
card firms and security 
organizations. He taught 
courses for the American 
Institute of Banking, the 
Massachusetts Credit 
Union League and the 
State Police Fraudulent 
Check Association. 

He was in court many 
times to testify as an 
expert in criminal cases 
and even in a murder. 

Bom in Bosron, he grew 
up in Quincy and was a 
1938 graduate of Quincy 
High School. 

In 1943, he joined the 
Army and served with the 
Army Air Corps, later the 
Air Force. 

During World War II, 
he was on Okinawa and 
stationed at several bases 
during his 22-year Air 
Force career. After his 
1964 retirement as a 
master sergeant from the 



study of handwriting. His 
years of study qualified 
him for the title of 
handwriting expert in 
Massachusetts. 

Among his awards were 
the "Man of the Year" of 
St. Clare's Church Holy 
Name Society and "Man 
of the Year" of the Quincy 
Lions Qub, both in 1991. 

He was a voracious 
reader and a member of 
the Braintree Council 
Knights of Columbus, the 
World Association of 
Document Examiners, the 
International Association 
of Credit Card 
Investigators, the 
American Society of 
Industrial Security and the 
International 

Graphoanalysis Society. 
He was a past president of 
the Quincy Lions Club. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Mary-Pat (Sacca) 
Swanson; a son, Kenneth 
M. Howes of Burlington; a 
daughter, Karen Howes- 
Duclos of Hanson; a 
brother, Carl O. Swanson 
of West Quincy; a 
granddaughter, and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Old North 
Cemetery, Weymouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Heart 
Association, 486 Forrest 
Ave., Brockton, MA 
02401. 



Benton B. Levinson, 81 

Orchestra Leader 

A memorial service for War U. An avid ham radio 



Benton B. Levinson, 81, of 
Quincy, an orchestra 
leader in the Boston area, 
was held Wednesday in 
Schlossberg and Solomon 
Memorial Chapel, Canton. 

Mr. Levinson died 
Monday in the Mediplex 
of Newton. 

He was an orchestra 
leader for many years, 
playing under the name of 
Ken Benton and his 
orchestra. 

He served in the Army 
Air Corps during World 



operator, he helped many 
servicemen contact their 
families. 

Bora in New Yoik City, 
he was raised in Quincy. 
He was a 1928 graduate of 
Quincy High School. 

He is survived by two 
brothers, Vernon Levinson 
and Sherin Levinson; two 
sisters, Helen Levy and 
Alice Young; and many 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in 
Odom Cemetery. 



Chai 



Helen E. Doyle, 87 



A funeral Mass for 
Helen E. (McBride) 
Doyle, 87, of Quincy, was 



CHRISTIAN OtOR e SOPHIA LORCr; 3 JOAN COLLiNS e VUAfiNET S PIEHRE CAfi::iN 



Fashion 
ewear 
SAVE 

'35 



J» OPTICAL & 

• D« HEARING AIDS J 



UXafsriMilMr 



773-3505 • 773-4174 

"aI"^ $499 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 



HAi <;TnN 



«Df>JTA » Vvf<; 54IM1 



celebrated July 3 in St. 
Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Doyle died July 1 
at Carney Hospital after a 
brief illness. 

Bom in Cambridge, she 
lived in Quincy for 45 
years. 

Wife of the late James 
E. Doyle, she is survived 
by a brother, Francis W. 
McBride of Arlington; and 
a grandchild, Janice 
Roderick. 

She was the mother of 
the late Edward V. Doyle 
and the late Judith 
Roderick. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Robert J. Riley, 73 

Insurance Company Supervisor 



A funeral service for 
Robert J. Riley, 73, of 
Wollaston, a employee of 
Hartford Insurance Co., 
was held Wednesday in 
Deware Funeral Home, 
576 Hancock St., 
Wollaston. 

Mr. Riley died Sunday 
at Quincy Hospital. 

He worked for the 
Hartford for 30 years and 
was supervisor of the 
actuary department when 
he retired in 1982. 

He was an Army 
veteran of World War II, 
operating 16-inch artillery 
guns with the Battery A-36 



Coastal Artillery Battalion. 
He was stationed in 
Portsmouth, N.H., and 
served in Panama. 

Bom in Yonkers, N.Y., 
he lived in Wollaston 
many years. He received 
his master's degree in 
business administration 
from Boston University. 

He is survived by a 
sister, Dorothy E. Riley of 
Wollaston. He was the 
brother of the late John F. 
Riley. 

Burial was in the 
veterans' section of Pine 
Hill Cemetery. 



Cornelia W. MacDonald, 93 

Former Head Accountant 



A funeral Mass for 
Cornelia W. (Maclntyre) 
MacDonald, 93, of 
Quincy, a retired 
accountant, was 

celebrated Wednesday in 
St. Ann's Church. 

Mrs. MacDonald died 
July 3 in Brockton. 

She was head 
accountant for the John 
Liner Insurance Agency in 
Boston for 50 years before 
her retirement in 1978. 



A native of Canada, she 
lived at Wollaston Manor 
for the past several years. 

Wife of the late J. Fred 
MacDonald, she is 
survived by many nieces 
and nephews, including 
Franklin C. Jay of Quincy. 

Burial was in Mount 
Benedict Cemeteiy. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keobane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 



Anna J. MuUin, 89 

Retired Teacher, Guidance Counselor 



A funeral Mass for 
Anna J. MuUin, 89, of 
Quincy, a retired teacher 
and guidance counselor for 
many years in the Boston 
school system, was 
celebrated Wednesday in 
St. EUzabeth's Church. 

Miss Mullin died July 2 
at Quincy Hospital. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Dorchester many 
years. She was a graduate 
of Mount St. Joseph 
Academy, Radcliffe 
College, and Harvard 
Graduate School. 

She worked for the 
Boston public schools as a 
teacher and guidance 
counselor at Jamaica Plain 
High School until her 
retirement in 1973. After 
retirement, she was a 
lecturer at Catherine 
Laboure School of Nursing 
and the Cardinal Cushing 
College, both of Boston. 

Miss Mullin was a 
member of Delta Kappa 
Gamma of Radcliffe 
College, the Boston, Club, 



Boston, and Emma Foibes 
Carey Guild. She also 
helped found and was a 
leader of the St. Ambrose 
Girl Scouts and remained 
active in the troop. 

She is survived by two 
cousins, Mary A. Mullin of 
Milton and Leonard 
Flaherty of South 
Yarmouth; a friend, 
Katherine H. McLeod of 
Quincy; two nieces, Mary 
St. Pierre of Duxbury, Kate 
Glynn of Connecticut; and 
three nephews, Robert 
Stiles of Plymouth, 
Richard Stiles of Scituate 
and Gregory Stiles of 
Duxbury. 

Burial was in New 
Calvary Cemetery, Boston. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Alfred D. 
Thomas Funeral Home, 
Milton. 

Donations may be made 
to the Carmelite 
Monastery, 61 Mt. 
Pleasant Ave., Roxbury, 
02119 or Covenant House, 
346 West 17th St., New 
Yoric.N.Y., 10011-5002. 




U.S. SAVINGS BONDS 




\ 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St, Quincy. MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 1 1 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

\ Rectoiy-21 Gay St. 773-1021 



Religion 



Thursday, July 8, 1»3 Quincy Sun Page 13 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Services at Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church, 310 Manet Ave., 
will be held Sundays at 
9:30 a.m. throughout the 
summer. 

Dr. Peter Corea's 
sermon topic Sunday will 
be "Familiarity Breeds 
Support." Chris Carlson 
and Paul Schofield will 
serve for the Diaconate. 



Music will be directed by 
Arden Schofield, organist. 
Greeter for July is Pam 
Lemieux. 

A coffee hour following 
the worship service is 
hosted by Gayle Mackay 
in the Conference Room. 

The church is air 
conditioned and 

handicapped accessible. 



Bethany Congregational 




Guest minister Rev. 
Arthur Curtis will preach 
Sunday at the 10 a.m. 
worship service at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Quincy Center. 

Rev. Curtis is the 
present pastor of the 
Pilgrim Congregational 
Church, North Weymouth, 
and a former assistant 
pastor of Bethany Church 
several years ago. 

Scripture reader will be 
Lisa Lundin. Musical 
selections will feature 
Robert Desmond, tenor 
and Gregory Flynn, 
organist. Worship greeters 
will be Marion McPberson 
and Gwen Fieberg. 

Hosting the Fellowship 



Hour following the worship 
service will be Mr. and 
Mrs. Qayton Simpson. 

Next Wednesday, July 
14th the second in a series 
of free mid-week concerts 
will feature the 
Sindelar/Strong Duo with 
flutist Virginia Sindelar 
and guitarist Berit Strong. 
They will perform 
Hispanic music of 
flamenco, tango, samba 
and choro. 

The concert is from 
12:15 to 12:45 p.m. with a 
lunch available following 
the concert. Conceit goers 
will have the opportunity 
to tour Bethany's 
sanctuary, Chapel and 
Gilchrist library. 



MAYOR JAMES SHEETS presents a proclamation 
acknowledging the importance of "Emergency Services 
Week" to the city's ambulance provider's (right) Robert 
J. Zammito, Jr., President, Ambulance Systems of 
America, in afTiliation with Norfolk-Bristol Ambulance, 
Stavis Ambulance and Worcester Himmer Ambulance. 

United Methodist 



Margaret Minyard's 
sermon will be "Where 
Are We In the 'Endless 
Line of Splendor?'" at the 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 

Beale St., Wollaston, at 
the 10 a.m. service 
Sunday. 

Music will be by Choir 



Director Scott Walker, the 
scripture reader will be 
Paul DelGreco. The 
greeters are Paul and 
Linda DelGreco, ushers 
are Mildred and Russell 
Peterson. 

There will be a 
fellowship hour in Susanna 
Wesley Hall following the 
service. 



William Chu On Tufts Dean's List 



William Y. Chu of 224 
Palmer St., Quincy, has 
been named to the Dean's 



List for the spring semester 
at Tufts University. 



For those times 

when the 
darkness lingers 



With I he loss of a loved one through death, it is helpful to be able to 
share the feelings and emotions which we all experience. 

iy«*«i-r!r:«^ K I For most of us, there are family members, 

clergy, and friends who are ready to listen in a 
caring way. 

Yet, there are those who find if helpful to 
share their grief with someone outside their 
immediate circle of support. 

Because of our continuing commitment to 
the families we serve, Keohane Funeral 
Service is pleased to announce that Dr. 
Sherry Johnson has joined our staff as a Grief 
Counselor. Her educational background, professional experience and 
understanding manner can be particularly helpful. 

We are the first funeral home in New England to offer the service of 
a Grief Counselor. 





^odano funeraf Service 



KEOHANr: FUNKRAI. IIOMK. INr. 

711) Hancock Slr«l 

Quincy. MA 02170 

617-77.1-1551 






PYNE FUNERAL HOME. INC. 

21 Emerald Strcti 

Hinfham. MA 0204) 

617-749-OJIO 



KEOHANE FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

)]} Hancock Sircci 

Quincy. MA 02171 

6I7-77J-J55I 



Page 14 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Sun Sports 



Lincoln-Hancock 
Race Benefits 
Fr. Bill's Place 




in Lincoln-Hancock School's recent second annual 2- 
Mile Run for Fr. Bill's Place. Also in photo are race 
organizer Steve Cantelli, a teacher at the school (left) and 
Fr. Bill's Place Executive Director Joe Finn. The event 
raised $700 for the homeless shelter, $150 more than last 
year's total. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 




LINCOLN-HANCOCK SCHOOL students recently 
participated in the second annual 2-Mile Run for Fr. 



Bill's Place. In all, 92 students ran in the race, which 
raised $700 for Quincy's homeless shelter. 



Golf 



Conboy Team Wins 

Broom Classic On 

4th Sudden Death Hole 



Donald Conboy ot 
Quincy hit a wedge to 
within a foot of the cup on 
the fourth sudden death 
hole as the team of Mitch 
McBride, Doug 

MacFarlane, Jim and Don 
Conboy won the 13th 
annual Broom Classic at 
the Presidents Golf Course. 

McBride, formerly of 
Quincy, was steady all day 
as was North Quincy 
teacher MacFarlane and 
former Quincy College 
basketball star Jim 
Conboy. 

It was Don Conboy's 
shot that dimmed the 
hopes of Quincy natives 
Ed Miller, Bruce Buckley, 
Chris Bell and Gerry 
Laydon. 

Buckley lipped out a 
putt on the third sudden 
death hole that would have 
won at that time. 

It was the second 
playoff in the 13 years of 



the classic as both teams 
finished in regulation at 13 
under par. Three teams 
finished tied at 7-under-par 
and two at 6- under. 

The scores: 

Phil Carlino, Robert 
Doyle, John MacFarlane 
and Alex Coutts, -7; Sam 

Abraham, Dave Robinson, 
George Peachey and 
Roger Conboy, -7; George 
McCall, Ken Furfari, Ed 
Lizzone and John 
Distephanis, -7. 

Don Smith, Jay Sarson, 
Doug Lane and Walter 
Sullivan, -6; Mike 
Donoghue, Stan Radzik, 
Mike Bellotti and Don 
Comis, -6; Ged Phelan, Al 
Bortolotti, James Doyle 
and Gus DeBoer, -4; Mike 
Conlon, Walter Hannon, 
Paul Prezioso and Fred 
Murray, -4; Dave DiCarlo, 
Paul Nestor, Ed 
McDermott and Tim 
Donovan, -4; Brain 
Buckley, Paul Radzik. 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRiPTtON BLANK AND MAIL TO 

LOST 



1372 HANCOCK STREET. QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



.STATE- 



.-ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



Pomarico, Rappoli 
Winners At Presidents 



Dave Haight and Paul 
Gill, -3; Barry Sullivan, 
Chip Ennis, Fred Gennelly 
and Chris Butler, -2; Roger 
Homan, Charlie Bergeron, 
DiFasio and Rich 
Newcomb, -1; Paul 
Donoghue, Paul Cadigan, 
Rick Radzik and Robert 
Wall, +1. 

Closest to the pin were 
Doyle on the second hole, 
McCall on the fourth, 
Abraham on the seventh, 
Mike Donoghue on the 
10th, Sarson on the 13th 
and Miller on the 18th. 

Jim Conboy had the 
longest putt on the ninth 
hole. Rick Radzik the 
longest drive on the 12th 
and Bortoltti had the best 
costume. 

Quincy Family Youth 
Services, Inc., is the 
benefactor of this fund 
raiser which recieves 
sponsorships form several 
indiviHiials and businesses. 



The Presidents Golf 
Course Ladies Association 
held a July 4th mixed 
open-pro shop tournament 
with mixed teams and 
individual men and 
women. 

In individual play for 
men Joe Pomarico had low 
gross of 71 and George 
Theobold was second at 
72. 

For women Carol 
Rappoli was first at 73 and 
Sandra Jordan was second 
at 81. 

In team play Steve 
Drysdale and Carol 
Rappoli were first with 65 
gross and Joe Pomarico 
and Paulene Connolly 
were second at 70. 

Scott Prebble had the 
low net for men at 64 and 
Dave Pomarico, Bob 



Meehan, Colin Robertson 
and Bruce Miller tied for 
second at 67. 

Kerri McGlynn had low 
net for women at 65, 
Barbara Robertson and 
Margaret Murphy tied for 
second at 68 and Carol 
Maglio, Susan Martinelli 
and Lorraine Feeney tied 
for fourth at 69. 

In team play Patrick 
McGIynn and Kerri 
McGlynn, Colin Robertson 
and Barbara Robertson 
tied for low net with 58, 
Dick Cahill and Carol 
Cahill, Scott Prebble and 
Maureen Savage tied for 
third at 60 and David 
Pomarico and Veronica 
Bertrand, Rick Maglio and 
Carol Maglio, Bob 
Maloney and Celeste 
Maloney, Mitch McBride 
and Marie McBride tied 



for fifth at 61. 

Joe Pomarico and 
Barbara Robertson came 
closest to the pin on the 
second hole, Colin 
Robertson and Lorraine 
Feeney on the fourth, 
Robbie Robertson and 
Carol Cibotto on the 
seventh, Patrick McGlynn 
and Susan Martinelli on 
the 10th, Will Hynes and 
Kerri McGlynn on the 13th 
and Scott Prebble and 
Carol Rappoli on the 18th. 

Joe Mclsaac had low 
skins gross at one, Tom 
Higgins was second at 5 
and Will Hynes third at 13. 

Jan Kelley had low 
skins net at two, Carol 
Cahill was second at nine, 
Carol Rappoli third at 15, 
Rusty Murphy fourth at 16 
and Karen Deane fifth at 
17. 



Triple A 



Shawmut Rallies 
For 11th Win 



Shawmut Class scored 
three runs with two outs in 
the bottom of the sixth 
inning to edge Local 2222, 
14-13, for its 11th Quincy 
Triple A Baseball League 
victory. 

Fred Butts second 
double drove in the tying 
run and he scored the 
winner on an overthrow. 

Josh Silverman had 
three hits, including a 
clutch double with two 
outs in the sixth to keep 
the rally alive. He also 
threw out two runners from 
center field. Pat Mullen 
relieved Kevin Markham 
and earned his second win. 

Shawmut tied Toddie's, 
4-4, with Shawmut's Vinny 
Chiu and Toodie's Matt 
Flynn pitching complete 



games. 

Tom Gaeta had two hits 
and Brian Correia, MuUen 
and Marham played strong 
defense. 

For Toodie's Jocelyn 
West, Sean Haidul and 
Jay Oriola played fine two- 
way games. 

Shawmut again scored 
two runs with two outs in 
the final inning to by KFC, 
17-16. 

Silverman's third hit of 
the game drove in Rick 
Loughmiller and Coneia 
with the winning runs. 
Chiu, who reheved starter 
Paul Galligan in the top of 
the inning, got the win. 

In addition to pitching 
five-plus innings in his first 
Triple A start, Galligan 
had three hits and fielded 



his position well. Chris 
Lee, Steve O'Hare and 
Craig Royce had two hits 
each and played strong 
defense. 

KFC rallied for five 
runs in the final two 
innings to take the lead. 
The standings: 
American League: 
Flavin & Flavin, 17-2-0; 
Local 2222, 13-5-0; 
YeUowCab, 10-7-1; IHOP, 
8-9-1; KFC, 7-10-0; Papa 
Gino's, 2-16-1; Green 
Pastures, 1-18-0. 

National League: USA 
Realty, 14-5-0; Shawmut 
Glass, 11-6-2; Kenny's 
Lock, 10-7-0; Toodie's, 10- 
7-2; Hurley Insurance, 9-9- 
0; Femald Plumbing, 8-11- 
0; Locker Room, 5-13-1. 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Legion Baseball 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The Morriseite Legion 
baseball team, defending 
Zone 6 champion, is 5-1-2 
in zone play and tonight 
(Thursday) will play at 
Canton at 6 p.m. 

Morrisette hosted East 
Hartford, last year's 
Connecticut and Northeast 
Regional champions, last 
night (Wednesday), will 
host Wollaston Saturday 
night at 7:30 at Adams 
Field and will be home to 
Randolph Monday at 8:30 
at Adams. It will face 
Holbrook in a double 
header starting at 5:30 
next Wednesday at 
Adams. 

Last Friday Morrisette 
lost to a New York all-star 
team, 7-5, in an exhibition 
game at Braintree. 

New York got off to a 
fast start against 
Morrisette starter Dan 
Duncan with three hits and 
a walk for a 2-0 lead in the 
first inning. 

He then settled down 
and allowed only two hits 
through the four innings he 
woiked. 

Morrisette scored four 
runs in the fourth. Jay 
Shiiabel drove in two nins 
with a bases-loaded 
double, Tom Malvesti 
singled Schnabel home 
and the fourth run scored 
on an error. 

Coach Dave Perdios 
then gave two of his 
younger pitchers a chance. 
Chris Cotter took over 
in the fifth and got out of a 
jam when he retired three 
in a row after giving up 
two singles. 

In the sixth New York 
scored four runs to take a 
6-4 lead. Cotter developed 
a blister with two outs in 
the sixth and Perdios 
called upon young Sean 
Dolbeare, making his first 
Legion pitching 

appearance. 



Morrisette 5-1-2 In Zone 6 Action 



He got out of the sixth 
and gave up a run in the 
top of the seventh on a 
wild pitch. 

Morrisette added a run 
in the bottom half when 
Dave Reinhart doubled 
and Malvesti singled. 

Reinhart and Malvesti 
had two bits each, 
Reinhart and Pat Shea had 
two hits and Schnable had 
his two-run double. 

"Wins and losses aren't 
important to us in these 
exhibition games," said 

Perdios. 

in Its latest zone 6 
game Morrisette rolled 
over Canton, 14-3, as 
Mike Patch pitched a one- 
hitter as Canton scored 
three unearned runs. He 
struck out six and walked 
three. 

Morrisette had 12 hits 
and took advantage of 
seven walks and two hit 
batters. 

Morrisette sent 12 men 
to the plate in the second 
and scored six runs for a 6- 
1 lead. It added four in the 
fourth, three in the fifth 
and one in the sixth. 

Malvesti had a double 
and single, was bit by a 
pitch and walked and 
drove in four runs. 
Schnabel had a double and 
single and two RBI, Serge 
Belcastro two singles and 
two RBI, Robbie Kane a 
triple and two walks and 
an RBI, Shea a single and 

RBI, Reinhart single and 
three walks and an RBI, 
Mark Cahill, Patch and 
Dolbeara a single each 
and Adam Calvert and 
RBI. 

Morrisette defeated 
Weymouth, 7-2, with Sean 
Donovan pitching a 
complete game and 
settling down after giving 
up both runs in the first 
inning. 

He allowed five hits, 
struck out six and walked 
two. 




YOU 

AUTO 

KNOW 




by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 

ROUGH RIDERS 

When an engine idles o^ gasoline. 



roughly, it may be an indi- 
cation that the fuel mixture 
in one or more of the cylin- 
ders is not igniting. The 
culprit may beafuel mixture 
that is either too rich (with 
gasoline) or too lean (ex- 
cessive amounts of air), 
resulting from deficient fuel 
delivery or from an £ur leak 
in the fuel delivery system. 
An engine malfunction, such 
as a loss of vacuum due to 
a cracked hose or damaged 
valve, may also be at the 
heart of the problem, or the 
cause may rest in the igni- 
tion system. Regardless of 
the source, accurately di- 
agnosing and correcting a 
rough- idle problem will likely 
improve fuel economy. If 
only one dead cylinder were 
to be the cause of a rough 
idle in a4-cylinder engine, it 
could mean wasting 25 
percent on each purchase 



HINT: A rough idle may 
simply be due to a loose 
ignition cable or vacuum 
hose. 

The best way to make 
sure your car and its engine 
functions at its optimum 
level is to follow a regular 
maintenance schedule. Our 
service department at LEO 
& WALT'S SUNOCO will be 
happy to help you set one 
up. Here at258 Quincy Ave., 
E. Braintree (843-1 550) our 
technicians have the best 
diagnostic equipment 
available anywhere, in- 
cluding the Hunter comput- 
erized brake analyzer. 
There is no charge for this 
wonderful service. 'A Place 
Where Your Car Can Live 
Longer." Sunoco and most 
major credit cards honored. 
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 6am-9pm, 
Sat. 7am-9pm, Sun. 9am- 
5pm. 



Morrisette scored a run 
in the first, scored five in 
the fourth and one in the 
fifth to hand Weymouth its 
first zone 6 defeat. 

Morrisette played its 
best defense of the year 
and Duncan and Brian 
Hayes made outstanding 
, catches in the outfield and 
the team had two fast 
double plays, one started 
by Malvesti and the other 
by Belcastro. Weymouth 
also had three runners cut 
down on the bases. 

A bases-loaded double 
by Shea and a bases- 



loaded single by Hayes 
were the big blows in the 
five-iun fourth. Donovan 
helped himself with two 
hits and a perfectly 
executed squeeze bunt 
with two strikes on him in 
the fifth. Shea had a 
single along with his 
double, Kane doubled, 
Schnabel had a single and 
Malvesti had an infield hit 
and scored twice. 

Morrisette played its 
second tie game of the 
season, tying Milton, 5-5, 
in a game called after 
seven innings due to 



darkness. 

Matt OToole started 
pitching for Morrisette and 
went five innings. He 
found the pitching mound 
uncomfortable and was 
wild as he walked six. He 
allowed eight hits, struck 
out three and gave up 
three earned runs. Pat 
Bryan relieved after a 
leadoff walk in the sixth 
and pitched two scoreless 
innings and allowed no 
hits. He did walk three, 
one intentionally. 

Malvesti and Hayes had 
outstanding two-way 



games. Malvesti reached 
base four times with a 
double, a bunt single, a 
walk and was hit by a 
pitch. 

Hayes threw out two 
base runners from right 
field. He reached base 
three times with a double 
and single and reached on 
an error. A highlight of the 
game was Shea's stealing 
home. 

Duncan had two hits 
and an RBI, OToole a hit 
and RBI and Mark Cahill 
beat out a bunt, stole 
second and scored. 




<S> 



CRIMSON HOCKEY SCHOOL 

with Ted Donato 
and Lane MacDonald 

July 26-31 at Quincy Youth Arena 



Daily Staff Includes: 

Ted Donato - Boston Bruins Forward 

Chuckle Hughes - Quincy native, Catholic 

Memorial, Harvard, Birmingham Bulls 

Lane MacDonald - 1988 Olympian and winner of 

Hobey Baker Award as nation's premier collegiate 

player 

Ronn Tomassoni - Head coach, Harvard University 

Kevin O'SuHivan - BU player 

Mike Bavis - BU player 

Mark Bavis - BU player 

Steve Flomenhoft - Harvard player ^ 

Spaces Still Available ^ 

Age Groups Times (M-F) Saturday Game 

(B) 1982-84 10:20 am - 1:00 pm 12:50 pm 

(C) 1978-81 1:10 pm -4:00 pm 2:30 pm 

Cost: $240/week, $205 additional family member 




Here's my application for the Crimson Hockey School: 

(Please Print) 

Student's full name 

Date of Birth 

Address .^ 

Town 



State 



zip 



Parent's Names 

Home Phone 

Position G 



Work Phone 



Please call (617) 783-3644 for additional information 

Crimson Hockey School 
P.O. Box 2232 
Natick, MA 01760 



Additional materials 
(including waiver) will be sent 



Page li Qnlncy Sob Thursday, July 8, 1993 



Nicole Shaughnessy Wins 
Sportsmanship Award 



At the recent Old 
Colony League all-star 
meeting the girls' spring 
track coaches unanimously 
named Quincy's Nicole 
Shaughnessy as their 
sportsmanship award 
winner. 

Nicole is a four year 
varsity letterman in track 
and was this year's co- 
captain. 

She remained at the top 
of the league's standings in 
her specialty, the javelin, 
all season and also ran the 
200 and 4x100 relay. 

"Nicole exemplifies 
everything that this award 
stands for," said coach 
John Franceschini. "Her 
dedication, leadership and 
sportsmanship are qualities 
she has carried throughout 
her career and Quincy 
High School is very proud 
of her." 



Babe Ruth 




NICOLE SHAUGHNESSY 



Morrisette Wins Pair 



Morrisette won two 
games during the past 
week in Babe Ruth 
League action, defeating 
Barry's Deli and Bryan 
VFW Post. 

Morrisette topped 
Barry's, 14-9, with Ryan 
Ploof the winning pitcher 
and Joe Biagini pitching 
well in relief. The loser 



was Billy Manning. 

Kenny Burke had a 
grand slam homer, Brian 
Walsh two singles and Jeff 
Feiner and Mike Centrella 
a double each. 

For Barry's Manning 
had three singles and Finn 
a double and two singles. 

In a 6-4 win over Bryan 
Post Rich Rose was the 
wiiming pitcher and Feiner 



pitched strong reUef. Scott 
Pryer was the loser. 

Walsh had two singles, 
Biagini a double and 
Jonathan Haddad had a 
sacrifice and two RBL 
Haddad had a fine day 
defensively. 

For Bryan Rb Callow 
and Rob Wiltshire played 
strong defense. 



Mahoney In Benefit 
Celebrity Golf Tournament 



Quincy's John 'Butch' 
Mahoney was among the 
entrants in the fourth 
annual M.L. Carr's "Drives 
for Alzheimer's" celebrity 
golf tournament held 
recently at the Andover 



Country Qub. 

A total of $135,000 was 
raised to benefit the John 

Henry Carr Alzheimer's 
and Aging Foimdation. 
Many celebrities joined 



NOW! 

A Complete Laser Video Disc 
Library At Your Fingertips 
If you have a laser disc player 
you can now easily select any 
disc in print by joining our club. 
Members receive our current 385- 
page catalogue listing over 7,000 titles 
which are dis- 
counted 10 per 
cent. 

Order now and 
receive a free copy 
of Laser View 
Magazine (a $2.50 
value) with your 
first laser disc or- 
der. 
Send only $6.25 (includes tax) 

plus $1.95 for shipping to: 

Laser Sights, P.O. Box 3392, 

Boston, Ma. 02101. 

(Allow 2 to 4 weeks for delivery) 





PRESIDENTIAL CONVALESCENT HOME in Quincy iias been purchased from tiie 
U.S. Banliruptcy Court Trustee. Outside the home are, from left, Robert Kelleher, 
home co-owner; Geoffrey Nothnagle, Bert Holden and Elaine Madden of Quincy Savings 
Banli; Gretchen Kelleher, home co-owner; Joan Trudell of the Small Business 
Administration; Mayor James Sheets; and Charles R. Simpson Jr., president of Quincy 
Savings Bank. 

Presidential Convalescent 

Home Purchased With 

Quincy Savings Bank's Help 



former Celtic Carr at a 
dinner following the 
tournament with 600 in 
attendance. 

Among those taking 
part were fonner Celtics 
star and coach Tom 
Heinsohn, fonner Celtic 
Jim Loscutoff and former 
Patriots Jim Colclough of 
Quincy and Ron Burton. 

An auction/raffle was 
conducted featuring over 
$45,000 worth of 
merchandise. 

Openings For 
Nightcourt 
Basketball 

There are still openings 
for the Third Annual 
Nightcourt Basketball 
School at Boston College 
High August 16-19. 

The school takes place 
for four nights from 5:30 to 
9:30 p.m. and appUcations 
are available for boys in 
high school. Local high 
school coaches will 
instruct and the cost of the 
camp is $90. 

For an apphcation call 
Brian Buckley at 472- 
7392. 



After several years of 
negotiations, Gretchen and 
Robert Kelleher have 
purchased the Presidential 
Convalescent Home from 
the U.S. Bankruptcy Court 
Trustee. 

The sale means a 
windfaU $325,000 in back 
taxes to the city of 
Quincy, as well as peace 

of mind for residents and 
employees who were 
concerned that the home 
might close if the sale was 
not approved by the court 
appointed trustees. 

It also means the end to 
a lengthy process during 
which the Kellehers tried 
several times to purchase 
the nursing home. Earlier 
attempts to close the final 
sale faltered when the 
previous owner was unable 
to pay back taxes to the 
city of Quincy, and back 
wages to nursing home 
employees. 

The Kellehers also ran 
into trouble when several 
area banks refused to grant 
a loan to finance the 
purchase. Ultimately they 
were able to obtain 
financial through a Small 
Business Administration 
(SBA) lending program at 
Quincy Savings bank. 



through the efforts of Bert 
Holden and Elaine 
Madden, commercial loan 
officers at Quincy Savings, 
and Joan Trudell of the 
SBA. 

"We were extremely 
pleased to be able to help 
the Kellehers purchase 
Presidential Convalescent 
Home," said Charles R. 
Simpson, Jr., president and 
chief executive officer of 
Quincy Savings. 

Simpson became 
involved in the deal after 
several patients, 

employees and Mayor 
James Sheets contacted 
him regarding the 
Kellehers plight in trying 
to arrange financing. One 
resident, 86-year-old Rose 
Applegate, wrote Simpson 
close to 100 letters 
describing her feelings 
about the home and asking 
for the bank's help. 

"By their nature, deals 
involving nursing homes 
can be very difficult to 
make," said Simpson. 
"However, we felt that this 
was a good loan based in 
part on the Kellehers' 
commitment to the 
faciUty." 

"Gretchen Kelleher has 
been director of nursing at 
the home for over 10 



years, and both Gretchen 
and Bob Kelleher know 
the operation inside and 
out. Their combined 
expertise should make the 
nursing home successful in 
the coming years. Luckily 
Joan Trudell of the Small 
Business Administration 
shared that assessment, 
and she advocated for the 
loan on behalf of the 
KeUehers at the SBA." 

Presidential 
Convalescent Home 86 
residents and 99 
employees. Several 

stopped by a recent 
gathering of those 
involved to thank Mayor 
Sheets for his assistance. 
However, one patient was 
insistent on meeting 
Simpson. In their first 
meeting since she began 
her letter writing 
campaign, resident Rose 
Applegate thanked Quincy 
Savings for providing the 
financing to keep the doors 
at the Presidential 
Convalescent Home open. 
Through the Kellehers' 
efforts, extensive 
improvements have been 
made to the building to 
make it more comfortable 
for residents, like 
Applegate, who call it 
"Home." 



City Tennis Program 
To Start July 12 



r 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Ktort's ■ chanc* to earn 
•xtra monay by iNiUding a \ 
Quincy Sun homa dalivary 
roula. 

Talaphone: 471-3100 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department is conducting 
registration for a new 
instructional tennis 
program to start this month 
at two separate locations 
in conjunction with the 
summer recreation 
program. 

Qasses wUl be offered 
Mondays at the Russell 
Park Playground (Voc- 
Tech Tennis Courts) and 
on Wednesdays at the 
Bishop Playground, 
Holbrook Rd. Gasses will 
be held at 9 to 10:15 a.m., 
10:30 to 11:45 a.m. and 
noon to 1:15 p.m. Each 
site will have classes for 
youths age 8-15 years of 
age, and the program will ■ 



last for 5 weeks. The 
instructor will be Kevin 
Murphy. There is a $5 fee 
for the program. 

The program is open for 
beginner to intermediate 
players who are residents 
of Quincy. Equipment will 
be provided, although 
participants are 

encouraged to have their 
own racquets for play and 
practice between lessons. 
The classes begin 
Monday, July 12, and 
Wednesday, July 14. 



Registration is being 
done at the main office of 
the Recreation 

Department, 100 Southern 
Artery fi-om 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. weekdays. Class size 
is limited and enrollment 
is on a first come first 
serve basis. 

Welch said the 
Recreation Department 
will still conduct it's free 
instructional program at 
neighborhood playgrouixls 
as part of the supervised 
playground program. 



Pitts Ponkapoag Winner 



The Women's Division 
of the Ponkapoag Golf 
Course recently played for 
the Rotera Cup. 

Eighteen holes were 



played with a tie for first 
place. After a sudden 
death playoff Dottie Pitts 
was the winner with 
Stephanie Rizza second. 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 Qnincy Sun Pngt 17 



MOMM^nifM. 



ttmii 



LEGAL NOTICE 




CXDMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

TVIE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1 591 E1 
Estate of CATHERINE F. 
FRIEND 
iateofOUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that 
CATHERINE M. 

MACDONALD of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 4, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this twenty-third 
day of June, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/8/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1637E1 

Estate of WILLIAM J. 

PAPILE 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 

presented in the above- 

captioned matter praying 

that the last will of said 

decedent be proved and 

allowed and that 

ELEANOR PAPILE of 

QUINCY in the County of 

NORFOLK be appointed 

executrix named in the will 

without surety on the 

borKl. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in saki 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 11, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this twenty-ninth 
day of June, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/8/93 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 173 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
that the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 976, 
as amended be further amended as follows: 
In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX Salaries. 
Section 151 . General Salary Classification & Wages: 
STRIKE OUT T HE FOLLOWING : 

SAURY: 
Administrative Assistant to City Council $27,288 

AND ADD THE FOLLOWING EFFECTIVE JULY 1 . 1993: 
Administrative Assistant to City Council $28,000 

A TRUE COPY, Attest: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
7/8/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 304 of 1992 

ORDERED: Oct. 19, 1992 

In Accordance with the provisions of Chapter 89, Section 
9, of the General Laws the following streets are 
designated as Stop Streets at the intersection and in the 
direction indicated: 

STREET NAME INTERSECTION direction 

North St. Atlantic Southerly 

A TRUE COPY. ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 
7/8/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 358 (1992) 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 
1 993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Chapter 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 10:20:040. 
Parking prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add 
the following. 

That Stop signs be installed on Hall Place facing traffic 
traveling in a Northerly and Southerly direction, at the 
intersection of Rogers Slieet. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1 993 

Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved June 30, 1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Patricia M. Toland, Asst. City Clerk 

7/8/93 



UEQAL NOTICES 



LEQAtHOtlCiS 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 97 

ORDERED: April 20, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1 993, as 
amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 10:20:40. 
Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific 
locations where parking is prohibited or restricted is on 
file in the office of the City Clerk. ADD THE 
FOaOWING: 

Install No Parking Signs of Fayette Street, from Brook 
Street to Elmwood Ave. 

A TRUE COPY, Attest: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk of Council 
7/8/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 113 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be It ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
that Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1993, as 
amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:09. Rules 
of the Road. Section 10:08:290. Operation of Vehicles - 
Turning Movements. 
ADD THE FOLLOWING: 

Install Right Turn Only sign at the intersection of 
Washington Street/Southern Artery, heading Southwest 
A TRUE COPY, Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

-,,«/«„ Clerk of Council 

7/8/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 96 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy 
that Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1993, as 
amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 10:20:40. 
Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific 
locations where parking is prohibited or restricted is on 
file in the office of the City Clerk. ADD THE 
FOLLOWING: 

Install No Parking signs of Safford St. from Beale St to 
Brook Rd. 

A TRUE COPY, Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 
7/8/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 117 

ORDERED: May 3. 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 
1 993, as amended, be further amerKled as follows: 
In Chapter 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 1020:040. 
Parking prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add 
the following. 
Install a Handicapped Parking Sign at 432 Granite St. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 . 1 993 

Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved June 30, .1 993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Patricia M. Toland, Asst. City Clerk 

7/8/93 




LEGAL NOTICE 



'LCGAi. ' Niiiiiiiii^iis - 

■ i-^y y**l*i^!?l??pl!i'^ :■ ! P :* !?jl^.:i!li'!l!.^iWIMij^jiy : ; : 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92D-1964-D1 

Summons By Publication 

Marek Piechowiak, 

Plaintiff 

V. 

Aneta Piechowiak, 

Defendant 
To the above named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Marek 
Piechowiak of Quincy, 
seeking to dissolve the 
bonds of matrimony with 
Aneta Piechowiak, who 
cannot be found within the 
Commonwealth. 

You are required to 
serve upon Charles 
Gennis, plaintiff's 
attorney, whose address 
is One Kendall Sq., Suite 
2200. Cambridge, MA 
02139, your answer on or 
before September 15, 
1993. If you fail to do so, 
the court will proceed to 
the hearing and adjucation 
of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy 
of your answer in the office 
of the Register of this 
Court at Dedham, 
Massachusetts. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this 8th day of 
June, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 
7/1,7/8/, 7/15/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 83 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:20. Stopping, Standing and Parking. 
Section 1020:40. Parking prohibited ar>d restricted where: A list of specific locations 
where parking is prohibited or restricted is on file in the office of the City Clerk. ADD THE 
FOLLOWING: 

SIDE 

South 



STREET 
Town Hill St. 



Town Hill St. 



7/8/93 



South 



FROM 


TO 


TYPE 


Kent St. 


127 Ft. North 
Of Kent St. 


No Parkin 


127 Feet North 


145 Ft. North 


No Parking 


of Kent St. 


of Kent St. 


HP Only 



A TRUE COPY. ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



June 21, 1993 



CfTY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 85 
ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1993, amended, be further amended 
as follows: 

In Chapter 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.08. Rules of the Road. Section 
10.08.140. Starting, Stopping, Turning and Backing. Add the following. 



SIBEEr 
Governors Rd. 

Plymouth Ave 

Edge Hill Rd. 

Dustin St. 



DIBEmiQtl 
Northbound 



Edge Hill Rd. 



Northtxxjnd 
Eastbound 



Dustin St. 
Governors Rd. 



7/8/93 



TYPE REGULATION 
All Traffic must turn left 
7-9 AM & 4-6 PM weekdays only 
All Traffic must turn Right 
7-9 Am & 4-6 PM weekdays only 
All Traffic must turn Right 
7-9 AM & 4-6 PM weekdays only 
All Traffic must turn Left 
7-9 AM and 4-6 PM weekdays only 
PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1993 
Attest: Joseph P. Shea 
Clerk Of Council 
Approved June 30, 1993 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
A True Copy, Attest: Patricia M. Toland, Assistant City Clerk 



Westbound Plymouth Ave. 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 

^r,r.^r, IN COUNCIL 

ORDER NO. 172 

ORDERED: 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy, as follows: 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976. as amended, be further amended as follows- 

STRIKE Ol^T^E^'roLLOWl^^^^ ^^'^''^^' ^'^°"^^^- Geneva' Salary Classification and Wages 

TITLE START STEP 1 

Executive Secretary 

To Retirement Board 32 , 1 68 

AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING EFFECTIVE JULY 1 1 993 

TITLE START STEP 1 

Director, 

Retirement Board 33,500 35,000 

Membership-Bookkeeper, 

Retirement 21 ,871 22,457 



STEP 2 



STEP 2 



STEP 3 
32,921 
STEP 3 

37,000 



June 21, 1993 



10 YEARS 
34,097 
10 YEARS 
39,000 



23,046 



23,628 



24,806 



7/8/93 



A TRUE COPY. ATTEST: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



Page 18 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 



'!!!f!f^!t;fll^lin!^^!!W!W!l^ 



CriYOFQUINCY 

IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 61 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1993, 
as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10:20. Stopping, Standing and Parking 
Section 10:20:40. Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specific locations 
where parking is prohibited or restricted is on file in the office of the City Clerk ADD THE 
FOLLOWING: ' 

2IBEn SIDE fBQM 12 

MartensenSt. West 65" North 85' North 

of Keating St. of Keating St. 

A TRUE COPY.: ATTEST: 



Quincy Community Action To Hold 
First-Time Homebuyer's Workshops 



7/8/93 



HEE 

Handicapped 
Parking 

Joseph P. Shea, 
Clerk of Council 



Cmr OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 184 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Title 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 1050. Stopping, Standing and Parking. 
Section 10:20:40. Parking prohibited and restricted where: A list of specifk legations 
where parking is prohibited or restricted is on file in the office of the City Clerk. ADD THE 
FOLLOWING: 

STRE^ SIDE £BQM IQ lifEE 

E. Elm Ave. West Elm Ave. 45' South No Parking 

Add: Overnight Parking Prohibited, No operator shall park any vehicle between the 
hours of 1 AM and 6AM upon any of the following streets 

E. Elm Ave. West 45' South of Wendell Ave. No Parking 

South Elm Ave. lAf/ioGAM 

A TRUE COPY. ATTEST.: Jo= eph P. Shea 

Cl«»:k of Council 
7/8/93 



Quincy Community 
Action Programs, an 
MHFA approved first time 
homebuyer counselling 
agency, will hold its next 
series of First Time 
Homebuyer' s Workshops 
July 20 and 27 and Aug. 3 
and 10 fi-om 6:30 to 8:30 
p.m. at Quincy City Hall 
(second floor conference 
room). 

Attendance at all four 
workshops is mandatory in 

llliliiiiB 

Thank You 
Blessed Virgin, 
St. Anthony and 

St. Therese 

H.F.M. 7/8 

THANK YOU 

ST. JUDE 
for favors granted 

D.S. 7/8 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



order to qualify for the 
different mortgage options 
through the Mass Housing 
Finance Agency and the 
City of Quincy Program. 

Agenda will be 
comprehensive and 
individualized. Focus will 
be on different aspects of 
the homebuying process: 
from locating an offer to 
types of financing. 

Advanced registration is 



LEGAL K0T1C6 



LEGAL NOTICE 



LEGAL KOnCE 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 1 40 June 7, 1 993 

ORDERED: Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 1976, as amended, be further amended as follows: 

In Chapter 2. Administration. Article XXX. Salaries. Section 151. General Salary Classification and Wages. 



STRIKE THE FOLLOWING: 


START 


Carpenter/Park 




Maint. Man, MEO 


491.19 


Head Carpenter 


491.19 


Mason 


491.19 


Meter Reader 


379.25 


MEO, Laborer 


379.25 


MEO, Special 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Gard. 




Hvy MEO 


479.37 


Wkg. Fore, Hwy. 




Maint. Craft 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Mason 


479.37 


Wkg. Fore, Laborer, MEO 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Special MEO 


479.37 


Wkg. Fore, Tire Repair 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Tree 




Climb, Laborer 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Water 




Meter Rep 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore. W/S 




Maint. Crafts 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, W/S 




Maint. Man 


491.19 


Yardman 


491.19 


AND INSERT THE FOLLOWING E 


Carpenter/Park 




Maint. Man/MEO 


491.19 


Head Carpenter 


491.19 


Mason 


491.19 


Meter Reader 


379.25 


MEO, Laborer 


379.25 


MEO, Special 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Gard, 




Hvy MEO 


479.37 


Wkg. Fore, Hwy 




Main. Crafts 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Mason 


479.37 


Wkg. Fore, Hvy 




MEO, Laborer 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore. Special MEO 


479.37 


Wkg. Fore, Tire Repair 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Tree 




Climb, Lab 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, Water 




Meter Reader 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, W/S 




Maint. Crafts 


491.19 


Wkg. Fore, W/S 




Maint. Man 


491.19 


Yardman 


491.19 



1STYR 

496.92 
500.36 
496.92 
389.56 
389.56 
496.92 

487.39 

496.92 
487.39 
496.92 
487.39 
496.92 

496.92 

500.36 

500.36 

496.92 
496.92 



496.92 
500.36 
496.92 
389.56 
389.56 
496.92 

487.39 

496.92 
487.39 

496.92 
487.39 
496.92 

496.92 

500.36 

500.36 

496.92 
496.92 



2NDYR 

502.65 
509.53 
502.66 
399.88 
399.88 
502.66 

495.41 

502.66 
495.41 
502.66 
495.41 
502.66 

502.66 

509.53 

509.53 

502.66 
502.66 



502.66 
509.53 
502.66 
399.88 
399.88 
502.66 

495.41 

502.66 
495.41 

502.66 
495.41 
502.66 

502.66 

509.53 

509.53 

502.66 
502.66 



3RDYR 



10YRS 



508.38 
518.70 
508.39 
410.19 
410.19 
508.39 


514.25 
527.50 
514.25 
422.72 
422.72 
514.25 


503.43 


516.04 


508.39 
503.43 
508.39 
503.43 
508.39 


514.25 
516.04 
514.25 
516.04 
514.25 


508.39 


514.25 


518.70 


527.50 


518.70 


527.50 


508.39 
508.39 


514.25 
514.25 


508.39 
518.70 
508.39 
410.19 
410.19 
508.39 


523.39 
533.70 
523.39 
425.19 
425.19 
523.39 


503.43 


518.43 


508.39 
503.43 


523.39 
518.43 


508.39 
503.43 
508.39 


523.39 
518.43 
523.39 


508.39 


523.39 


518.70 


533.70 


518.70 


533.70 


508.39 
508.39 
ATTEST: 


523.39 

523.39 

Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk of Council 



required and space is 
limited. Fee of $40 for all 
four sessions covers the 
cost of the workshop text 
and all copied materials. 

For more information 
and registration forms, call 
Kaye Wagner, bousing 
specialist at Quincy 
Community Action 
Programs, Inc., 1509 
Hancock St., Quincy, 
02169.479-8181. 



mmmmmm 



iiOAL NOTICES 



7/8/93 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 23 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 
1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Chapter 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 1020:040. 
Parking prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add 
the following. 

The Traffic Commission recommends that a double 
Yellow line be painted on East Squantum St. from 
Huckins Avenue to Crabtree Road, and to Replace the 
existing STOP SIGNS and paint a STOP LINE on 
Sonoma Road to improve visibility. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1 993 

Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved June 30, 1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Patricia M. Toland, Asst. City Clerk 

7/8/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 81 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy, as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 
1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Chapter 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 10:20:040. 
Parking prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add 
\\\e following. 
Install Stop sign on Moscow St. at Holmes St. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1993 

Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved June 30, 1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Patricia M. Toland, Asst. City Clerk 

7/8/93 

CPPr' OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 82 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained by the City Council of Quincy as follows: 
That the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy, 
1993, as amended, be further amended as follows: 
In Chapter 10. Vehicles and Traffic. Chapter 10.20. 
Stopping, Standing and Parking. Section 10:20:040. 
Parking prohibited on certain streets at all times. Add 
the following. 
Install Handicapped Parking Sign at 88 Billings Street. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 21 , 1993 

Attest: Joseph P. Shea 

Clerk Of Council 

Approved June 30, 1993 

James A. Sheets, Mayor 

A True Copy, Attest: Patricia M. Toland, Asst. City Clerk 

7/8/93 

CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO. 93 

ORDERED: June 21, 1993 

Be it ordained, that the revised ordinances of the City of 
Quincy, 1993, as amended, be further amended as 
follows: 
Chapter 8.04 is amended by adding the following section 

8.04.100 - Building Owner - Responsibilities - 
Emergency Evacuation of physically challenged 
residents. 

All owners of residential structures of six or 
more units shall provide a diagram of the floor and 
apartments and indicate on said diagram where 
physically challenged individuals reside. This diagram, 
which shall be approved by the Chief of the Fire 
Department, or his designee, shall be filed with the Rre 
Department. Such information shall remain confidential 
and is intended for Fire Department use only, to assist in 
an evacuation during an emergency situation. 

This section shall apply forthwith to all new 
construction. All other existing structures shall comply 
with the provisions of this section within twelve (12) 
months of its effective date. 

A TRUE COPY, Attest: Joseph P. Shea 
7/8/93 Clerk of Council 



Thursday, July 8, 1993 Qnincy Sun Page 19 




EVERYBODY'S MARKETPUCE 



FOR RENT 



SERViOES 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Sons of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 47^SM0 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

767-0519 TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouinfy 

472-2223 



HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Handcapped Access^. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-9824 

Monday through Saturday 4-7pfflTF 



PREOSDN 

LAMP 

REBMR& 

REWIRING 



I '— ' [[[ IIIII JH 

SERVICES 

^"i 4. ' J fll>M M 4« H ^ m tl'l HM II M I M 



SEBViOES 



"^ M I M II M I MM I HMMM I MM I M I M I MMM»MMM»MH f*»T V IIl HM IIW MW yi Mm i«yt^^H 



SERVICES 



"•W'WWWWWWfttW 



SERVICES 




Ml, 




w.oiMa nouMa 



VIKING 

ROOFING 

Residential 
Specialists 

773-2884 



9/S 



mimm'- 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

1 suitable for large functions 
(350-t- people); other suited for 
smaller functions (1 20 people). 
Call ttie George F. Bryan Post 

472-6234 s/z 



COTTAGES 
FOR RENT 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, house- 
keeping cottages. Stu- 
dio and 3 room avail- 
able. Weekly rentals 
$200-$350. Private 
beach. Tennis avail- 
able. Call 328-1300, 9 
am to 6 pm 



TF 



APT. FOR RENT 

Near bus line in Houghs 
Neck-Front porch - 2 
bedrm. Adults prefen-ed. 
$675.00/month. 472-1 952 
Call after 12:00 noon 7/b 



^WMM^^^^AAAA^A^ 



Sav* Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



Moved - 

SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

New Mattress Outlet -Now at 
Stoughton Center next to 
Post Office-Rte 27/1 38-344- 
4488-Opening Days Saleg/23 



WANTED 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old hand tools, all trades 
(machinist, pattern maker, 
watchmaker, etc.) shop bts. 
Also, antiquarian books, 
frames, paintings. Antiques in 
estate lots. 

1-617-558-3839 it 




A Great Big "Thank You" to 
Bonnie Seely, her "Grew" at 
Blackwood Pharmacy and 
Quincy l-lospice Nurses for 
their constant and caring help. 
Bless Youl 

Ernie & Dot 7/8 



THANK YOU 

ST. JUDE 
for favors granted 

R.H.E 7/8 



REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS 



CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

INVITATION FOR PROPOSALS 

Sealed proposals for household hazardous waste 
collection and disposal will be received at the Office of 
the Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, 
Quincy, MA 02169 until 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday, August 
12, 1993 at which time they will be publicly opened and 
read. Late proposals will be rejected and left unopened 
A PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE IS SCHEDULED 
FOR: Tuesday, July 29, 1993 @ 10:00 A.M. in the 
offices of the Commissioner, 55 Sea St., Quincy, MA. 
The successful respondent will be required to furnish a 
performance bond and a labor and materials or payment 
bond, each of a Mass Qualified Surety Company and 
each such of the contract price. 

A full scope of services and specifications will be 
available for pick up at the Office of the Commissioner of 
Public Works from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. beginning 
Tuesday, July 8, 1993. Respondents requesting 
specifications to be mailed to them add a separate check 
for twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, payable to the City of 
Quincy, to cover mailing and handling. 
Responses are subject to the provisions of M.G.L., Chap 
30, Sec. 39M. 

The City of Quincy reserves the right to waive any 
information in or to reject any or all proposals if it is in the 
City's interest to do so. 

David A. Colton, Commissioner of Public Works 
James A. Sheets, Mayor 
7/8/93 




EXPERf 

LAMP REPAIR 
I RfWWING 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



P RQFESSQNAL 

REBMR 
WMXMS 
&SCREEN5 



^^RrtK 



HMRPI^Ml 



v.ouMa 



HOMNCT MAMIMI 



LARRY'S 

HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior - Exterk>r Painting 
Scroll Celling 
All Home Repairs 

Small or Large 
1-800-479-2476 tf 



Janl-Clean Co. 

Insured - Certified Professional 

Carpet - Window Cleaners 

1 0% off Carpet Cleaning 

Free Fabric Protector with any 

2 upholstefy items deaned 

(617)341-3852 8/12 

750 Sq. Ft. 

FREE Estimates 

Ace Hardwood Floors 

Woodfloors. Sanded 

Refinished-repaired 

(617)770-3023 7/15 



ATTENTION 

Local cabinetmaker needs 
work! I will resurface your 
kitchen (with laminate of your 
choice), for less than half the 
cost of new cabinets. 

QUALITY CRAFTMANSHIP 
/ Mko rmston antique himltuim. 

W.F. ALLEN 
CABINETMAKER 

Over 30 yrs. experience 
(617) 328-9048 

Leave Message 7/15 



SMALL STUFF!! 

(20 i uf). CIsaning, r»nx>val, grass cut, 
trimming, brush ramovsd, trencfws dug tor 
elBcrical wiring, graval dispwss, painting, 
picl(-ups, daiveries. /VIso asit atx>ul $1 0.00 
removal deal. 

Call John Boy Services 
328-4596 7/15 

CONSTRUCTION 

Roofing, painting, carpen- 
try, porch work, windows, 
door, gutters. Small jobs and 
vinyl siding. FREE esti- 
mates. T. Sweeney 
825-1210 Reliable mo 



AARONS GLASS 

Lowest prices guaranteed. 
Plate and safety glass, 
screens, custom mirrors 
all shapes and colors, 
tabletops. 773-3290 mo 



■tH*mtWW*»W*****«**i«tt H I » *«iMt H I M > 



A&T VACUUM 

• 19.95 Overhaul Spedal on 

any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and deaning 
•Sharpening 

(sdssors, knives, etc.) 
•Greek XL Vacuums $249 

• Eledrolux w/power nozzle 

$199. 

• Used vacuums $45 & i|> 

27 Beale St., Wdlaston 
479-5066 IT 



ATTENTION! 

IHelp an eager young college 
student finance his education 
Looking for: 

- Lawn jobs 

- Hedges Trimming 

- Gutter Cleaning 

- Odd Jobs 

Call for a free estimate and 
help me by letting me help you 

471-8541 
Ask for Ted or leave message 

7/22 



LENOREBIRKU 

JUSTICE OF THE 

PEACE 

UNIQUE CEREMONIES 

WITH STYLE 

617-472-7454 7/8 



Your South Shore ' 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin SI . So Quincy 

4/2-1710 

TF 




YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 

Mowing Service 
e Expert Bush & 

Hedge Trimming 
e Yard Cleanup 
e Fertilize Lawn 
e Other Work-Ask 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 

Call Bill Fielding 
471-6124 8/26 



You can afford me 

Handyman with refer- 
ences. Low hourly rate. 
Call day or evening. Ask 
for Bill or leave message. 
328-0689 



7/8 



^5> 






m 



S' 



^^^^^^{^^^^^^,^^^^^^,^,^^^4, 



O'HARTE MASONRY 

Complete Masonry 

Service Lie. & Ins. 

Phone Ted 

at 773-8622 

after 7 p.m. 7/» 



SULLIVAN TREE SERVICE 

Pruning, removals, 

cableing, fertilizing, 

brush chipping. 

Fully Insured FREE est 

Mike 472-3595 w 




FROB\NE 

20LB.TANK 

DCHANGE 

$7.99 

wEsroMcroMr 

4ia-«250 VOTOUMa 

BINGO 

Knights of Columbus 

5 Mollis Ave 

Earlybird 7 PM, every 

Wednesday 

2 Winners take all 

Lucky 7s-Bonus 

FREE Coffee-Snacks W23 



Typesetting Equipment 
For Sale 

2 Varjtyper Compact 351 

with Fonts 

1 Selectline PermaKwik 
Processor 

BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN. 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment mutt accompany order. 



RATES 



INDEX 



a Services 

D For Salt 

a Autos 

a Boato 

O For Rent 

O Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

a Pels, Livestock 

a Lost and Found 

O Real Estate For Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

O Antiques 

a Coins k Stamos 

a Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

O Day Care 

D Personal 

D Electrical A Appliances 



•-rWEIKt 

•-12 WEEKS 

1* WEEKS 
OR MORE 



a $8.00foronelnMrtk>n.upto20word^10efore«:hadditlon«lword. 

D $4.e0perineertionupto20word«forS-7lnaertloo$o«theMmead. 

109 each addtttonal word, 
a $4J0perlneerttonupto20wordtfor8-12lnMrttonioftheMmead. 

109 more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per InMrtlon up to 20 word* for 13 or more InMrtlont of the 
same ad, 109 each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
in The Quincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



_weeks 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WMi M MAWE AT THIS COMTHACT ^;^»*^,^^^^'S*^^^'^^ 
OCAOUNE: MONDAY, 5M PM. FLCASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMMR IN AD. 



r 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 8, 1993 




State Police Barracks 
Recommended In Quincy 



QUINCY RESroENTS, from left, Thomas Gruttner, Doris Fabyan and Melvin 
Mallockall were among more than 400 South Shore Hospital volunteers honored at a 
recent volunteer recognition luncheon. The volunteers welcomed 19,000 patients, 
greeted 32,000 visitors, answered 60,000 phone calls and contributed more than 108,000 
hours of service to the ho^ital this year. 



State Senator Michael 
Morrissey (D-Quincy) 
announces that the State 
Police, as part of their 
facilities management 
plan developed under the 
Police Consolidation bill, 
have recommended that a 
new State Police barracks 
be constructed on state 
owned land on the 
Southeast Expressway in 
Quincy at the former 
Howard Johnson site. 

The facilities plan is 
only a recommendation 
and is subject to available 






LiSSliliLi. 



MP 



We have 
moved, but 
our focus 
hasn't 
changed! 

Currently accepting new patients. 



Dr. Domenic SirazzuUa and 
his staff are pleased to 
announce the relocation of 
their ophthalmic offices. We're 
in the same building, on the 
same floor — our offices have 
just moved around the comer! 
Our address and phone 
number remain the same. 

This move will allow us to 
better serve our patients with 
state-of-the-art, quality eye 
care in a more spacious and 
comfortable environment. 



Domenic M. Strazzulla, MD 
Crown Colony Office Park 
500 Congress Street 
Suite lA-1 
Quincy, MA 02169 
(617)770-1505 



fWidiitg statcof-the-att 
eye care, now and into the 
mtmt: 

m cataract surgery 

■ kns implants 

9 in-ofTice laser surgery 

M treatment for glaucoma and 

diabetic eye disease 
Dr. StrccxtiRii is a baaidumfied 



HAVE YOUR PAYROLL, 

SOCIAL SECURITY, 

PENSION, OR ANY 

GOVERNMENT CHECK 

MAILED TO US FOR 




South Boston Savings Bank Direct 
Deposit allows you to have your 
payroll, social secunty, pension or any 
government check mailed directly to the 
bank. Some of the advantages of direct 
deposit are... you can protect against 
mailbox theft. ..you can save time... 
eliminate tnps to the bank, and your 
money is available when you need it. 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

•^ "ALWAyS THE LEADER" -- 



Have It deposited in a NOW checking 
account that pays interest", regular 
savings or money market account 

• No monthly service charge and 
no charge for basic checks for 
Direct Deposit customers 

and 18/65 customers. 

• No monthly service charge 

for $750 minimum balance. 
Under $750 balance--$3.00 per 
month + .25e per check. 

SlO minimum daily balance required on all accounts 
to earn interest 



MEMBER FDIC/DIF 



MAIN OFFICE NEPONSET CIRCLE QUINCY NORTH OUINCY WEYMOUTH NEEDHAM WEST ROXBURY 

460 West Broadway 740 Gallivan Blvd 690 Adams St 440 Hancock St 544 Mam St 355 Chestnut St i833 Centre St 

South Boston 825-9090 Lakin Square 733-8100 377-1050 449-0210 323-8000 

268-2500 479-9660 



funding and bonding 
approval. The proposed 
plan would consolidate the 
State Police Barracks at 
the former MDC Police 
Barracks of the Lower 
Basin, Old Colony, Blue 
Hills and possibly 
Norwood. 

Two new stations would 
be constructed, one in 
South Boston in 
conjunction with the 
Central Artery-Tunnel 
project, and one in Quincy 
on the Southeast 
Expressway on the sit of 
the former Howard 
Johnson's Restaurant. The 
two stations would 
modernize and update 
poUce stations serving the 
entire South Shore area. 

"The location of thi 
barracks at the Quincy ' 
would be a tremendous 
boost to the area," 
Morrissey said. "Not only 
would it increase response 
times to the heavily 
traveled Southeast 
Expressway, Route 3 and 
Route 128, but it would 
also provide the city of 
Quincy additional 
assistance and a speedier 
response to problems 



which may develop along 
MDC roads such as 
Quincy Shore Drive, 
Furnace Brook Parkway 
and the Blue Hills." 

Morrissey noted that 
although police 

consolidation is 

proceeding "fairly 
smoothly," much more 
must be done if the 
potential of the 
consolidated State Police 
Force is to be realized. 

"We must invest in new 
communications 
equipment, vehicles and 
centrally located, modem 
facilities if this 
consolidation is to fully 
succeed," he said. "We 
cannot allow our state 
troopers to drive vehicles 
which are unsafe and 
unable to communicate 
with each other while 
operating from police 
barracks which do not 
meet state building codes 
or modern police 
standards." 

Morrissey promised to 
push for funding for the 
new equipment and 
stations in the next state 
capital expenditures bond 
issue. 



Sylvia Gelsomini Receives NEBI Degree 



Sylvia Gelsomini of 
North Quincy recently 
received an associate's 
degree in business 
administration with a 
concentration in branch 
management from The 
New England Banking 



Institute (NEBI). 

Gelsomini, an 

employee of South Shore 
Bank, distinguished herself 
by working full-time in the 
industry while finishing her 
associate's degree in the 
evening. 



Cheryl's Hair Solution 



HQircute 

Men & Women $10 
Chikften $7 

5 yrs. & under $5 



Perms $40 & up 

spirals $45 & up 
Highl^hts $^&up 
Fociol Waxing $5 



Tues. & Fri. 10-6, Wed. & Thurs 10-8, Sot. 9-4 

Walk-ins or appointments 

1446 Hancock Street, Quincy Ctr. 

472-1344 

(at same location as Gino's Barber Shop) 



BURN MORE FAT 

THAN RUNNING 

15 MILES!!! 



IN 30 DAYS YOU CAN LOSE 
UP TO 30 LBS. FOR $30. 

Personal counseling available 
at no additional charge 

fi's fast, safe, and effective. It's so simple, and here's how it 

works! YOU TAKE 2 GREEN TABLETS AND 

1 BEIGE TABLET IX^S A DAY ONCE AT 10AM 

AND ONCE AT 3.00 PM - THATS IT! 

Helps to lose weight at a tilgtier rate. 
Helps to eliminate body fat. 

It's like nothing else available today. It also gives you 
twis of energy! If you're not completely satisfied within 
10 days, we will refund your money back with no 
obligation. 

A PORTION OF THE REVENUE FROM THE SALE OF 

EACH BOTTLE IS DEDICATED TO IMPROVING THE 

ENVIRONMENT & SAVING THE RAIN FORESTS 

MaU Orders Accepted 

NORMAN I. NISENBAUM, B.S. 

Registered Pharmacist 

215 Samoset Ave.-Quincy, MA 02169 

CALL (617) 471-1963 



Quincy Center Sidewalk Festi 



A .'til ^11?:) 



M.Uii'l 1 LH^'u WUiMU liVlAlUlld. 



(ir I 



9^1 





VOL.25 No. 43 



Thursday, July 15, 1993 



. ' Ji 





ENDANGERED ANIMALS were the subject of an art program at Parker School. Fifth 

graders Beth Dolne, Brian Purcell and Jaime Wilkinson pose with their creations, a 

leopard, rhinoceros and an owl. Students also wrote letters to Congress urging 

protection for endangered species. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

City Sues MWRA 
Over Rate Charges 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

In an attempt to change 
the methodology by which 
the Massachusetts Water 
Resources Authority 
charges its water and 
sewer rates, the City of 
Quincy Tuesday filed a 
lawsuit against the 
MWRA in Suffolk 
Superior Court. 

Mayor James Sheets 
said at a press conference 
Tuesday that the MWRA, 
which charges 

communities by population 
rather than actual water 
usage—which also impacts 
the sewer charge-must be 
made as soon as possible 
to change this 
methodology. 

Sheets said the "heart 
and soul" of the litigation, 
which is not a class-action 
lawsuit but will seek a 
declaratory judgement on 
the matter, is the fact that 



when the MWRA was 
created in 1984, the state 
legislature required that 
the sewer charges assessed 
by the MWRA "shall give 
account to" five factors: 

•Actual costs to the 
authority of providing 
services. 

•Reasonable provisions 
to provide incentives to 
promote conservation of 
resources and encourage 
maintenance and 

improvement of sewer and 
water systems in a 
community. 

•Reasonable provisions 
reflecting contributions 
made by municipahties for 
leak detection, system 
rehabilitation, sewage 
inflow-infiltration 
reduction projects, 
separation of combined 
sewers and other projects 
to improve overall 
efficiency. 



•Reasonable provisions 
to reflect a municipality's 
historical investment in 
the sewer system and in 
the former MDC sewer 
system. 

•Reasonable interest 
charges and penalties for 
delinquencies in payment. 

Sheets said that by 
using its current 
methodology for charging 
water and sewer rates, the 
MWRA has not lived up to 
these provisions. City 
officials have stated in the 
past that the methodology 
favors some of the 43 
communities under the 
MWRA's jurisdiction, 
including Boston, and 
places an unfair financial 
burden on others such as 
Quincy. 

The mayor added that 
while in the past eight 
months he has seen a 

(Cont'd on Page 5) 




10,000 Homeless From Floods 

City To Send 
Food, Supplies 
To Quincy, III. 

By MICHAEL WHALEN 

City officials hope that a relief effort planned to aid the city of Quincy, lU. will 
be able to reach the flood-ravaged area by Saturday. 



Veterans Services 
Director Hank Bradley, 
organizer of the effort, said 
Tuesday that the 10,000 
people who have been 
forced to leave their 
homes because of the 
flooding are in need of 
immediate relief. 

"We would like have 
the first truck there 
Saturday," said Bradley, 
"but it depends on what 
we get for coUection." 

Mayor James Sheets 
said Tuesday that residents 
are asked to bring food 
donations and other 
personal items such as 
toothpaste to the central 
organization point (front 
lobby) of New City Hall, 
1305 Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. The mayor added 
it is hoped donations can 
be loaded into trucks in 
front of City Hall and 
mobilized as soon as 
possible. 



The drive to Quincy, Dl. 
is "1,100 or 1,200 miles," 
according to Sheets, and 
would take approximately 
20 hours to drive. 

Bradley said at press 
time he was uncertain 
whether the city would use 
vehicles leased from a 
local trucking company or 
if one of the area's major 
grocery chains, such as 
Stop & Shop, Shaw's or 
Star Market would be able 
to lend trucks to the effort. 
Grace Giunchiglia, 
secretary to the mayor, 
said local companies that 
would likely play some 
part in the effort include 
Stop & Shop, Procter and 
Gamble and Gillette Co. 

Quincy Emergency 
Management Deputy 
Director Tony Siciliano, 
who is helping to 
coordinate the program, 
said the effort could use as 
many helping hands as 



possible. 

• "These people (in 
Illinois) need food now," 
said Siciliano, who noted 
that six members of 
Quincy High School's 
STEP (Summer Training 
Education Program) have 
already offered to 
volunteer their time and 
e£foits to the program. 

Bradley said he and 
Mary Timcoe, a past 
president of the Houghs 
Neck Legion Post, came 
up with the idea of aiding 
Illinois when they heard on 
the news about the 
similarly-named city being 
devastated by flooding. 

Sheets said that 
Quincy, 111. has no official 
"sister" relationship with 
this Quincy, although be 
has in recent years 
developed a friendly 
relationship with former 
Quincy, 111. Mayor Vem 
Hagstrom. 



It's Quin-zee Here 
And Quin-cee There 



CLASS AWARD was presented to second graders of Joan Gleason at the Parlier School 
fnrTh^lr nartlclnation in the Environmental Protection Agency's ecology poster contest 
Froit fow'TfroTu^ Richard Lee, Michele Pinkhan., France Chow, Raymond Chin. 
?.<! row, Rohin Gulling, Jessica Bjork, Jessica ^^^-^^^l^^^l^^^ Tom Gorman) 



Our Quincy and Quincy, 
lU. have a lot in common 
but differ over the 
pronimciation of the name. 

It's Quin-zee here and 
Quin-cee there. 

We pronounce it Quin- 
zee because that's the way 
the Quincy family 
pronounced it. 

Our Quincy was named 
on Ffeb. 22, 1792 for Col. 
John Quincy, great 
grandfather of native sixth 
President John Quincy 
Adams. 

(Juincy, 111. is one of 17 
Quincy's named for John 
Quincy Adams. 

A hamlet with a 
population of 10 residents 
was named Quincy, 111. 
March 4, 1825 when 
Adams was inaugurated 
president. 

The county in which it 
was located was 
designated Adams county. 
And the hamlet's main 
drag was named John's 
Square. 

That little hamlet is 



now the aty ot Qumcy. 

The other 16 Quincys 
are in Cahfomia, Florida, 
Indiana, Kansas, 

Kentucky, Michigan, 
Missouri, Mississippi, New 
Hampshire, Ohio, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, 
Washington, West 
Virginia and Wisconsin. 

All 16 pronounce it 
Quin-cee. 

But the Quincy family 
hved here-not there. And 
if they pronounce it Quin- 
zee, that's the way 
residents here think it 
should be. 

Regardless of the 
debate over the 
pronunciation, Quincy, 111. 
and our Quincy have had a 
friendly relationship in the 
past including the 
exchange of students 
between the two cities. 

The two cities shared in 
the commemoration of the 
150th anniversary of the 
opening of the first railroad 
in the United States in 
April 2, 1826. 



The railway was built 
here in Quincy to haul 
Quincy granite from the 
quarries to the Newponset 
River where it was barged 
to Charlestown for 
construction of the Bunker 
Hill Monument. 

In April 1976, a group 
of students, teachers and 
parents from here visited 
Quincy, 111. which was 
celebrating its 

Bicentennial. They brought 
granite chips as memento 
gifts to students in Quincy, 

m. 

A week later. 
Approximately 60 
students, teachers and 
parents fi^om Quincy, 111. 
came here and were shown 
the local historic sites. 

Including the birthplace 
of John Quincy Adams and 
his father, second 
president John Adams. 

Of the 16 other 
Quincys, Quincy, 111. has 
had the closest ties with 
our Quincy— a sister-city 
like relationship. 



Page 2 Quincy Snn Thursday, July IS, 1993 



Hearing Tonight On MWRA 
Interceptor Relief System 



The Massachusetts 
Water Resources Authority 
will hold a public bearing 
tonight (Thursday) at 7 
p.m. in the second floor 
conference room of 
Quincy Qty Hall regarding 
its plans to build a new 
regional sewer system to 
serve 120,000 residents in 
Braintree. Weymouth, 
Holbrook, Randolph, 
Hingham and Quincy. 

According to the 
MWRA, the $128 milUon 
system will eliminate raw 
sewage backups into 
residential homes, 
basements and local 
streets in Braintree and 
Weymouth and abate the 
pollution of the Fore and 
Monatiquot rivers. The 
authority recently 

completed a Final 
Facilities Plan and 
Environmental Impact 
Report on the 60-year-old 
system, which the MWRA 
says does not have enough 
capacity to meet current 
and future needs. 

"This new sewer system 
is long overdue," said 
MWRA Executive 
Director Douglas 
MacDonald. "For many 
years, there has been a 
serious pubUc health threat 
with raw sewage backing 



up into homes and streets 
whenever it rains and it is 
essential that this project 
moves forwards." 

The recommended 
alternative includes a deep 
rock tunnel below Quincy 
and Weymouth, two new 
pumping stations (one to 
replace the existing pump 
station in Quincy and a 
new one in North 
Weymouth), new siphons 
and gravity sewers and 
work on existing pipes in 
Weymouth, East Braintree 
and Quincy. 

Construction of the 
deep rock tunnel will also 
allow the MWRA to 
transport sludge from the 
Deer Island Wastewater 
Treatment Plant to the 
Fore River Pelletizing 
Plant via pipeline in an 
inter-island tunnel. 

Most of the construction 
for the project would be 
done by tunneling. This 
method, the MWRA says, 
will avoid digging up 
streets, backyards and 
sensitive marsh-land areas, 
and it's the most 
acceptable alternative to 
the communities involved. 

MacDonald said the 
existing sewer system was 
built in the early 1930s 
and, despite tremendous 
growth in the 



communities, little was 
done to enlarge the system 
to prevent the pollution 
problems, which began in 
1954. Planning for the 
new sewer system began 
in 1981 by the MDC be 
noted, but concern from 
residents about how and 
where die system would be 
sited and constructed led 
to further delays. 

Prior to the MWRA 
Board of Directors vote to 
<q)prove the recommended 
plan, all three 
communities voiced their 
support, MacDonald said. 

There will be a brief 
presentation summarizing 
the plan and its 
environmental impacts, 
followed by public 
comment and questions. 

Copies of the Final 
Facilities Plan and 
Environmental Impact 
Report are available in the 
reference section of the 
Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington 
St. 

Members of the 
Citizen's Advisory 
Committee representing 
Quincy, Braintree and 
Weymouth met with the 
authority and its 
consultants over a two- 
year period. 



1^ QUINCY'S FIRST TIME A 
^ HOMEBUYERS PROGRAM *^^ 



EOUUHOUSMC 



EQUUNOUSNB 



The City of Quincy, through its Department of 
Planning and Community Development, is offering 
several programs for ehgible first time homebuyers: 

1) Down Payment Assistance 

2) Soft Second Mortgage Program 

3) MHFA Acquisition and Rehabilitation Program 



Different income limits apply for each program 
Property must be located in Quincy 
Applicants must have good credit history 
Applicants processed on a first come-first serve basis 
Certain restrictions apply 

For more information, call James Chaput, Department of Planning and Community 
Development, City Hall. 1305 Hancock St.. Quincy. AfA 02169. Tel: 376-1379. 






FLY TO 
CAPE COD 
BY BOAT! 

Back by popular demand - 
our 2-1/2 hour cruise 
to Provincetown! 

Fly by the highways and bridges. 

This is the fastest, most fun way 

to the tip of Cape Cod! 

Spend 4 hours exploring the sights, 

shops, and streetside eateries. You can 

even explore the sand dunes, or climb the 

Pilgrim Monument and see back to Boston' 

After your fun-filled day, relax with a 
cocktail on your cruise back as we watch 
the sun set over the Boston skyline. 

Sailing from Bay Pointe Marina In Quincy, 
•very Wednesday & Thursday, June 23- 
Sept. 2. Departs at 9, returns at 6:30. Kids 
age 8 and under go free. 

617»770»1008 



r Quincy to 

• Provincetown 
BOAT EXPRESS 



Located 3/4 mile north of the fore River Bridge oft Rt 3A 
Bay Pointe Marina, Vi/ashington Court. Quincy 




Considered 'Armed And Dangerous' 

Barnstable Man 

Wanted In Death 

Of Quincy Woman 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 
and MICHAEL WHALEN 

A 25-ycar-ol(I Barn- 
stable man accused of 
murdering a 24-year-old 
Quincy woman outside ber 
family's Wollaston home 
Saturday evening re- 
mained at-large Tuesday 
as local and state 
authorities stepped up their 
search for the suspect. 

An arrest warrant was 
issued at 3 p.m. Tuesday 
for John Anthony Diaz, of 
437 Old Mill Rd., 
Barnstable, who is 
accused of fatally shooting 
Dawn E. Brown, a former 
Quincy resident and 1985 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School. 

Police consider the 
suspect, who allegedly 
shot Brown in the forehead 
with a 9mm firearm, 
armed and dangerous. 

"Anyone in contact 
with him (Diaz) should 
consider him armed and 
dangerous," Quincy Police 
Captain Robert Salvaggio 
said. 

Salvaggio said an anest 
warrant was issued after 
Diaz, who once dated the 
victim's sister, was 
positively identified at the 
murder scene by members 
of Brown's family. 

"He was last seen at 38 
Royal Street (the Brown 
residence) the night of the 
murder. He was positively 
identified at the scene," 
Salvaggio said "As a 
result of that 
identification, a warrant 
was issued today 
(Tuesday) at 3 p.m." 

Salvaggio said Quincy 
Police, State Police and 
officials from the Norfolk 
County District Attorney's 
office are looking for Diaz, 
a former boyfriend of 
Kimberlee Brown. Asked 
if authorities are confident 
an arrest will be made 
soon, Salvaggio said, "We 
are as confident as we can 
be. Eventually, he'll be 
found." 

Salvaggio said Logan 
Airport and other police 
departments along the 
Eastern seaboard have 
been advised of the 
warrant and the search for 




DAWN BROWN 

Diaz. Police said they 
believe Diaz, who will 
turn 25 Saturday, may be 
driving a 1991 black Jeep 
Cherokee 4X4 sport 
model with a red stripe, 
license plate 589-CKS. 

He is described as 
black, approximately 5- 
foot 8-inches tall and 185 
pounds. He was last seen 
wearing a blue sweatshirt 
and blue-jean or denim 
shorts. 

Authorities believe that 
the killing may be a case 
of mistaken identity. 
Police have speculated 
that Diaz may have 
wanted to murder 
Kimberlee Brown in a 
jealous rage over her 
impending marriage. In 
the darkness, the killer 
may have mistaken Dawn 
Brown for her sister. 

Quincy Police Lt. Neil 
MacDonald said 

Kimberlee Brown was 
interviewed by police 
Monday but did not 
disclose further details. 

Family members told 
police that the gunman, 
who they believe was 
Diaz, shouted 

"Kimberlee" before firing 
a single shot at Dawn 
Brown with a 9mm firearm 
from just three feet away. 
Witnesses included 
Dawn's fiance, Mitchell 
Goldstein of New Jersey, 
and her 12-year-old 
nephew. 

Brown, her fiance and 
nephew had just returned 
home from a local 
Friendly 's Restaurant for 
some ice cream. Brown 
was shot at around 11:16 
p.m and died in a Boston 
hospital about eight hours 
later. 

At the time of the 



DRIVERS WANTED 



Most trips sell out — 
reservations are necessary 






Deliver The Quincy Sun to 

news outlets and carriers 

on Wednesday afternoons. 

Must have own car. 

Familiarity with 

Quincy streets a plus. 

Call Bob at 471-3100 



murder, Kimberlee Brown 
was with her fiance, David 
Goldstein-Mitchell 's 
broUier-at The Tent, a 
Marina Bay nightclub. 
Police went to The Tent 
after the shooting and 
escorted Kimberlee, who 
is now staying at an 
undisclosed location, away 
for her own personal 
safety. 

Police have said 
Kimberiee has been living 
"in fear of her life" since 
the shooting. 

Kimberlee and her 
sister Dawn bad recently 
moved to New Jersey 
where they met the 
Goldstein brothers. 
Kimberlee and David 
Goldstein had introduced 
Dawn and his brother 
Mitchell to each other. 

Mitchell and Dawn, 
who had since become 
engaged, were in Quincy 
last week to help 
Kimberlee prepare for her 
own bridal shower, which 
was held the night of the 
shooting. 

Dawn was scheduled to 
begin a new job Monday 
at Morristown Memorial 
Hospital in New Jersey. 
She had taken evening 
health career courses at 
Quincy College part-time 
from 1989 until the past 
spring semester. The 
courses prepare students to 
enter the college's nursing 
program. 

She planned to continue 
taking night courses firom 
her new apartment in 
Andover, N.J., about 25 
miles northwest of 
Morristown, according to 
Peter Pastras, director of 
psychiatric program 
development at the 
hospital. Dawn had been 
living in New Jersey for 
only a few weeks. 

Her sister Kimberlee 
had been tranferred by her 
employer last September 
to a nearby New Jersey 
community. Prior to that, 
the Brown sisters had lived 
all of their lives in Quincy. 

The murder is the 
second shooting death in 
Quincy this year. 

On Feb. 5, a man was 
displaying a gun before a 
fiiend on Gilmore St. The 
gun was dropped and went 
off, fatally wounding die 
friend. The man was 
charged with 

manslaughter. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-310ff 



Thanday, July 15, 1993 Quincjr Sua Page 3 



Pilot Trolley Service 
To Historic Sites Begins 



A pilot trolley bus 
service linking the various 
National Park Service 
sites within Quincy began 
operation Wednesday and 
local officials hope the 
venture will boost the 
city's tourism effort. 

Brush Hill 

Transportation Company, 
Beantown Trolley of 
Randolph, was awarded 
the contract. 

The service, part of a 
pilot program for this 
tourist season, connects 
National Park Service 
sites within a 3-mile 
circuit including: the 
Visitor Center at 1250 
Hancock St.; the John 
Adams and John Quincy 
Adams Birthplaces at 133- 
141 Franklin St.; the 
Adams National Historic 
Site at 135 Adams St. and 
the United First Parish 
Church, 1306 Hancock St., 
where the Adams 
Presidents and First Ladies 
are entombed. 

National Park Rangers 
will be aboard the trolley 
to interpret the area's 
historical significance. 
Marianne Peak, 

superintendent of the 
Adams National Historic 
Site, called the trolley 
service "a critical link to 
communicating the Adams 
story and Quincy history to 
the park visitor and is a 
direct result of the efforts 
by U.S. Senator Edward 
Kennedy, who 

acknowledges the 
importance of Quincy 's 
history and contributions of 
the Adams family to our 
country." 

The trolley will operate 
seven days a week, 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. The first trolley 
will depart from the 
National Park Service 
Visitor Center at 9:15 a.m. 

The interpretive fee for 
the optional trolley service 
costs $1 for adults, 50 
cents for children 16 and 
under; and is free to 
children children five 
years and under. The 



A DIET 
BREAKTHROUGH 

Break The 
•Yo Yo" Treadmill 

Experience the 
proven benefits of 

Thermo Crome 5000 



• Energizes without 
caffeine 

• Preserves lean body 
mass while dieting 

• Activates thermogenesis 

(burning of calories for energy 
by brown adipose dscue) 

• Controls sugar cravings 

To Order Send 
Check or M.O. For 

9daytrialsupply-$10.00 
30 day supply-$35.p0 

(Includes postage & handling) TO: 



P & B ASSOCIATES 

25 WEBSTER STREET 

NO. QllNCV, MA 02171 

(617) 328-8374 



trolley ticket is valid all 
day. 

Peak said a portion of 
the interpretation fee may 
be used to subsidize the 
trolley service which she 
estimated at $500 per day. 
The service will be 
monitored and reviewed 
monthly. Peak said she 
hopes the trolley runs 
through Nov. 10, the end of 
the tourist season. 

The regular and 
separate entrance fee for 
the park remains the same: 
$2 for adults, free for 
visitors 16 years and 
younger and 62 years and 
older. The Park Pass, 
Golden Eagle Pass, 
Golden Access Pass, and 
Golden Age Pass are 
accepted for the entrance 
fee. 

Peak said the trolley is 
equipped with a portable 
ramp for handicapped 
accessibility. "Next year, 
with the proper funding, 
we will put a contract out 
for bid for a trolley which 
has a hydraulic unit which 
is handicapped 

accessible," she added. 

Noting visitation during 
June was 102 percent 
higher than 1992, Peak 
said the trolley service 
"will greatly enhance the 
visitor experience and 
enable visitors to tour the 
city in an effective, 
efficient way." 

The superintendent said 



the Adams NHS 
anticipates offering trolley 
service next season on a 
full-time basis, April 19 
through Nov. 10 to meet 
the needs of all park 
visitors. 

"It is also a park goal to 
inc'ude other historic sites 
along the trail through a 
cooperative effort working 
with the city, state and 
other agencies and 
organizations." Peak 
singled out Mayor James 
Sheets and Cong. Gerry 
Studds for supporting and 
promoting tourism and a 
trolley system within the 
community. 

Adams National 
Historic Site was 
established in 1946 as a 
unit of the Department of 
the Interior, National Park 
Service to commemorate 
and preserve the family 
home and estate of the 
presidential Adams family 
and their descendents. In 
1979, the John Adams and 
John Quincy Adams 
birthplaces were added to 
the park boundary. 

In 1993, in cooperation 
with the United First 
Parish Church, the site 
interprets the crypts of the 
Presidents and First 
Ladies For more 

information about the 
site's programs, call the 
National Park Service 
Visitor Center at 770-1175. 




PRESroENTIAL WREATH is laid upon the tomb of John Quincy Adams, sixth 
president of the United States, on his 226th birthday In the crypt located In the basement 
of United Fb-st Parish Cliurch. Officials taking part hi the ceremony are, from left. 
Mayor James Sheets, the Rev. Sheldon Bennett, church minister; Commander Peter 
Ligman, U.S. Naval Reserve Center, Quincy Reserve color guard, Lisa Sauvageau, 
Christine Cartmell, South Weymouth Naval Ak Station color guard Petty Officers Scott 
ADen and Peter Pearson. 

{Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Mosquito Spraying Continues 



Morning application of 
the pesticide resmethrin 
for the control of adult 
mosquitoes will continue 
this week, according to the 
Quincy Health 

Department. 

Spraying was scheduled 
for today (Thursday) from 
2 to 7 a.m. in selected 
areas of Quincy east of 
Hancock St. and east of 
Washington St., which 
may include some of the 
following neighborhoods: 

Squantum, eastern 



portions of Atlantic, 
Norfolk Downs, coastal 
WoUaston, Merrymount, 



Houghs 
Germantown, 
Quincy Point. 



Neck, 
and coastal 





There's really only one 

reason why you'd 

go to a mall . . . 



To shop 

Tedeschi Food Shop 
Buck-A-Book 

To eat 

G.J. Coddington's Restaurant 
Cafe Lazzarino 
Dunlcin' Donuts 

To primp 

Presidential Dry Cleaners 
Robert Lyons Hair Salon 

To learn & be entertained 

National Park Service 
Visitor Center 

TobarA 

The Boston Five 

Bank, Loan Center & ATM 



fimit 10 Bulgers per family 
Good only at: 275 Hancock Street, Quincy 



To see & be seen 

Harvard Community Health 

Plan Optical Snop 



To care 

Presidents Place Dental 

Associates 

Weight Watchers 

Or maybe you'd go 
for it aU! 



Presidents Place 

J 230 ll.incock Street 
Quincy 



Acrou from the 
Quincy Center MBTA Station 

Validated porking with purchase. 
Free parking every weekend. 



Page 4 Qnlncy Sno Thursday, July 15, 1993 



OPINION 







USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St , Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth Jr. Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth. Editor 



3M p«r copy. $12.00 p«r yMr by mall U\ Ouincy 
$14.00 par year by maU outslda Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St . Quincy Mass 02169 



The Quincy Sun atiumas no (minciil responsib.iity (or 
typogriphica! •rron in ■dvertiMmentj bul will repnni ihit 
p«n ol in ichfarMerrcnl m which the typograpnical error 
occurs 



'A^'- 



Joseph Kennedy To Speak 
At Chamber Breakfast 



Congressman Joseph P. 
Kennedy n will speak at a 
South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce 7:44 Breakfast 
Friday at Lombardo's in 
Randolph. 

Kennedy, a member of 
the House Banking, 
Finance and Urban Affairs 
Committee and chairman 
of the Subcommittee on 
Consumer Credit and 
Insurance, is expected to 
discuss the state's 
economic prospects, as 
well as those of the nation 
as a whole. 

As Congressman from 
the state's eighth district 
since 1986, Kennedy will 
talk about several issues of 
concern to the business 
cranmunity, including the 
availability of credit to 
small businesses, the tax 



program and the future of 
health care, particularly 
the Clinton 

administration's upcoming 
proposals. 

Arthur R. Connelly, 
president of South 
Weymouth Savings Bank 
and chairman of the 
Chamber's board of 

directors, will introduce 

Kennedy. 

A question and answer 
period will follow 
Kennedy's remarks with 
Atty. Arthur Murphy of 
Muiphy, Hesse, Toomey & 
Lehane serving as the 
presenter. 

Tickets for members are 
$12 each, $110 for tables 
of 10, and $20 for non- 
members. For reservations, 
call 479-1111. 



James Tsipakis On Dean's List 

James Tsipakis of Health Sciences for the 

winter quarter 1993. 

He is a candidate for a 
bachelor's degree in 
pharmacy. 



Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's List at the 
Massachusetts College of 
Pharmacy and Allied 



Florin Neamtu On RPI Dean's List 

Florin E. Neamtu, 18 Polytechnic Institute in 



Wallace Rd., WoUaston, 
has been named to the 
Dean's List at Rensselaer 



Troy,N.Y. 

Neamtu is a freshman 
majoiing in engineering. 



^ Medically 
^ Speaking 

by lUkbaelM. Bakerman, M.D., FjLCC 




RmiRE HOPES FOR 

A simple non-evasive 
test to determine arterial 
ck>ggmg may be on the 
horizon, thanks to work 
being done at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. Cardiok>gists there 
have reported encouraging 
findings using a new im- 
aging test A bft of synthetic 
LDL protein is injected into 
the bk>odstream, where it 
latches onto any areas in 
the arteries that are start- 
ing to have atherosclero- 
sis build-up. The synthetic 
hookup packs a radioac- 
tive substance that shows 
up in pictures taken with a 
special device called a 
gamma sdntillatkxi cam- 
era. TNs lets doctors get a 
good kx>k at the degree of 
arterial cbgging, including 
patches that ooukl break 
off and block bk>od flow, 
before arteries become 
severely bkKked. 



CLOG DETECTION 

P.S. The earlier arte- 
rial dogging is detected, 
the easier it is to treat 
with diet, exercise, arxJ 
drugs. 

The new test ought to 
prove useful for doctors 
with patients whose 
family history or lifestyle 
makes them particularly 
susceptible to cardiac 
disease. For more infor- 
mation on this topic or on 
tiie prevention and treat- 
ment of heart disease, 
call the doctors — myself, 
Dr. Ronald Dunlap, or Dr. 
Lisa Antonelli, at COM- 
PREHENSIVE CAR- 
DIAC CAREat472-2550. 
Offk» hours are by ap- 
pointment, and our new 
office » located in Crown 
Colony, 700 Congress 
SL, Suite 2C, in Quincy. I 
am affiliated with Quincy 
Hoepilal and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



The First Black Candidate 




Martin Ervin, who has since dropped out of the 
mayor's race, was referred to here and in other 
newspapers as the first black political candi- 
date in Quincy's history. 
Not so. 

He may have been the first black 
candidate — short lived as his cam- 
paign was — for mayor but not the first 
to run for elective office here. FMWTS 

That distinction apparently went to Sam Shellman 
61 years ago. 

The Sim's "Quincy's Yesterdays" column recently 
had an item about Shellman's death in 1935 which 
gave a little background about him. (The item was 
called to our attention by an anonymous reader.) 

Shellman, a native of Georgia came to Quincy in 
1911, had a barbershop in WoUaston and lived on 
Beale St. 

In 1932 he ran ran for the City Council at-large with 
the slogan "The Council Needs More Color." 

We did a little research on that election and found 
there were 20 council at-large candidates in the pre- 
liminary runoff that year. 

Shelhnan finished 19th with 635 votes. The last 
place candidate named Akerstrom had 619. Thomas 
Burgin who went on to become mayor, state senator 
and one of the city's great political powers, topped the 
20-candidate field with a vote of 9,996. 

Shelhnan collapsed in his barbershop in May, 1935 
and died enroute to Quincy Hospital in an ambulance. 

Q 
STEVE HAWKO of White St. has decided not to 
run for the Ward 4 City Coimcil seat. 
"I came within an inch of get- 
ting in," he says, "but because of fam- 
ily considerations, I dcm't think this is 
the year for me to be candidate. I think 
1995 would be better." 
HAWKO Hawko, an environmental 

protection department engineer, is a former member of 
the Medford School ConMnittee and a recent appointee 
by Mayor James Sheets to the Quincy Park-Recreation 
Board. 

Granite City Grange 
Donates Book To Library 

Granite City Grange 
#368 has donated a book 
chronicling the many 
events and experiences of 




the Grange to die Thomas 
Crane Public Library. 

The book, "People, 
Pride and Progress," was 
written by David H. 
Howard. It chronicles the 
many events and 



experiences of the Grange 
over 125 years of activity 
all across the country. The 
Grange is also known as 
the Patrons of Husbandry. 

Granite City Grange of 
Quincy meets the second 
and fourth Friday of each 
month at the Houghs Neck 
CongiegatioDal Church. 



DRIVERS WANTED 



Deliver The Quincy Sun to 

news outlets and carriers 

on Wednesday afternoons. 

Must have own car. 

Familiarity with 

Quincy streets a plus. 

Call Bob at 471-3100 





ASSISTANT CITY CLERK 
Padicia Toland now has two other 
titles: notary public and justice of the 
peace. She received both commis- 
sions the other day. 

Q TOLAND 

NAVY CAPTAIN Donato Liuzzi, a Quincy native, 
will take command of the destroyer tender USS Acadia 
at ceremonies tomorrow (Friday) in San Diego. 

Liuzzi attended Quincy elementary schools, Boston 
High College High School and Holy Cross where he 
was in the ROTC. 

He is a cousin of Jeanne Liuzzi Barry of WoUaston 
and her son, Sean, candidate for Quincy School Com- 
mittee, and public affairs manager at Quincy College. 

Q 
A NICE NOTE from Ron Delia Chiesa, popular 
host of WGBH's "Music America" 
and former Quincy resident. 

"Just a note of thanks for the 
Sunbeams piece on my family. I was 
delighted to hear about councillor 
(Tom) Fabrizio's proposal to name 
DELLA CHIESA the Children's Center after my late 
uncle," (former Mayor Amelio Delia Chiesa). 

Ron's mother, Florence, a young 88, still lives in 
Quincy. His father, the late Aldo Delia Chiesa was 
Ward 3 city councillor in the early 1940's. 

Ron fondly recalls when he was a soda jerk at the 
now long-gone Alhambra Tea Room on Hancock St. in 
Quincy Sq. across from The Sun's office. 

He and his wife, Joyce, recently celebrated their 
sixth wedding anniversary. She shares his love for 
great music. 

Q 
SMILE DEPT: From the Quincy Kiwanis Club 
newsletter (and from wherever they got it): An eccentric 
man is a person who is too rich to be called a crack-pot. 

Q 
SENATOR Michael Morrissey's annual Boston 
Harbor cruise is set for tomorrow (Fri- 
day) aboard, appropriately, The 
Conmionwealth. Boarding is at Ma- 
rina Bay with anchors aweigh at 7:45 
pjn. There will be entertainment and 
a buffet on board. Tickets are $20 and 
may be reserved by calling 328-0900. ^^j^jjggg^ 



Readers Forum 



L.S.T. Reunion Committee 
Seeks ^Missing' Shipmate 




Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

We are organizing a 
reuni(Hi of shipmates who 
served on L.S.T. 869 during 
World War O. We are 
trying to locate John V. 
Donnelly. His address 
forty-eight years ago was 
148 Darrow St., Quincy, 



MA. 

If anyone can help in 
our search, please contact: 

Raymond J. Conway, 6125 
Flossie Rd., Conway, S.C. 
29527, 803-397-5205. 

Raymond J. Conway 
Conway, S.C. 




BUYU.S. 
SAVIMOS BONOS 



Thursday, July 15, 1993 Qulncy Son Page 5 



City Sues MWRA Over Charges nnin.^ 

Confd From Page 1 Continue to pay higher special counsel Peter Koff other MWRA communities VDcLilllv-y O 

ianineful chanee" in rates." Dreoared the lawsuit saiH m\aUt ii^i^ rt..;.. :_ .l. «/ 



Confd From Page J 

'meaningful change" in 
terms of cooperation from 
the MWRA, which 
reduced its FY94 water 
and sewer assessment from 
what it originally 
projected, a more equal 
balance between 

communities is required. 

'The MWRA has been 
cooperative with the rate 
explosion, but the issue 
we're dealing with today is 
rate equity," said Sheets. 
"We are unjustly charged 
because of the 
methodology, and if we 
don't pursue this matter, 
we think it could be years 
(before the methodology is 
changed) and people will 



continue 
rates. 

Sheets said the city is 
asking three things of the 
court: to declare the 
currently methodology for 
the allocation of sewer 
charges to the City of 
Quincy as unlawful, to 
direct the MWRA to 

revise its methodology for 
sewer charges to take into 
account the criteria 
outlined above, and to 
direct the MWRA to 
prepare a specific plan and 
timetable for determining 
charges and submit it to 
the court for q>proval. 

City Solicitor Stephen 
McGrath, who along with 



special counsel Peter Koff 
prepared the lawsuit, said 
plans for the litigation in 
its current form began to 
solidify about two months 
ago. The matter of a 
lawsuit first was first 
discussed by the City 
Council last fall, be said. 

McGrath added that 
while other communities 
have in past months have 
discussed with Quincy 
officials the possibility of 
jointly filing the lawsuit 
against the MWRA, it was 
decided earlier this week 
that it would be in the 
city's best interests "to 
proceed on our own." 
McGrath said that the 
possibility remains that 



other MWRA communities 
might join Quincy in the 
litigation, but nothing is 
certain as yet. 

Other officials at the 
press conference included 
City Council President 
Charles Phelan, Ward 1 
Councillor Peter Kolson, 
who recently organized a 
"Tea Party" at Marina 
Bay to protest the MWRA 
water and sewer rates; 
Ward 2 Councillor 
Theodore DeCristofaro, 
Ward 6 Councillor Bruce 
Ayers, Councillor Joseph 
LaRaia, Department of 
Public Works 

Commissioner David 
Colton, and Administrative 
Assistant Bemice Mader. 



Yesterdays 



Navy Assures 

Repair Work 

At Victory Plant 

Forest I. Neal, president of the Quincy Chamber of 
Commerce, received word from Cong. Louis A. Pm tNngham 
that the Navy plans to retain the Victory plant at Squantom 
as a repair base for destroyers and submarines. 

"Received personal assur- ■•■— ■ 



306 On Central Honor Roll 



Central Middle School 
lists 306 students on its 
forth quarter honor roll. 
They are: 

High Honors 
Elizabeth Ashworth, 
Joshua Ballard, Maya 
Barahona, Elizabeth 
Bennett, Paul Burke, 
Stacie Bush, Daniel 
Cannon, James Cantelli, 
Elizabeth Carten, Gen 
Chen Kang, Ashley 
Crawford, Michael 
Demeo, Sarah Dinsmore, 
Sean Donovan, Christina 
Duncan, Allison Eyring, 
Michele Fafara, Ruth 
Fishman, Ian Fung, Mark 
Goodman, Brendan Griffin, 
Suzanne Gunnerson, 
Alison Haddad, David 
Haendler, Bardhyl 
Hajrizaj, Laura Hamilton, 
Amy Harper, Andrea 
Healy, Kimberly Huerth, 
Tanya Huid, Paul Hussey, 
Meredith Hutchinson, 
Deirdre Jacobs, 

Christopher Jones, John 
Katsarikas, Timothy 
Keating, Michael Kelly, 
Sarah Kiley, Alexander 
King, Helen Lao, 
Christopher Lee, Nancy 
Lee, Eric Leung, Meaghan 
Lewis, Courtney Lomond, 
Paul Lutts, Leona Ma, 
Craig MacDonald, Adam 
MacMillan, Lisa 

MacOnochie, Ian 
MacRitchie, Colin Martin, 
Alexis Miranda, Anthony 
Monaco, Jennifer Musso, 
Courtney Paquette, James 
Parisi, Mark Peterson, 
Lauren Prague, Michael 
Racicot, Eric Rackauskas, 
Brian Radell, Michael 
Regan, Elizabeth Ryan, 
Stephen Ryan, Angela 
Scott, Kelly Scott, 
Meghan Soillane. James^ 
Sullivan, Elden Tarn,' 



Shirley Tan, William 

Tracy, Joseph Watson, 

Marianne Weiler, Nicole, 

Weiler, Michael Whalen, 

Shirley Wu, Kevin Ann, 

John Barron, Erin Barry, 

Alma Batac, Michelle 

Boneck, Kathleen Burke, 

Jonathan Caliri, Paul 

Carney, Thomas Chan, 

Mary Chenette, William 

Connolly, Michael, 

Costales, Patrick 

Coughlin, Brad Croall, 

Joanna Cullen, Jon 

Delucia, Christopher 

DiMattia, Erin DJerf, JuUe 

Dunn, Karl Ehrens, Joseph 

Flores, Jill Garland, Justin 

Graeber, Pamela Gray, 

Carmela Guarino, Jennifer 

Hill, Tracey Jurewich, 

Michael Kane, Melissa 

Keefe, Rebecca Kelsch, 

Matthew Lebo, Sharon 

Lee, Wilham Ma, Amity 

Manning, Jeffrey Marks, 

Justin Marquis, Kara 

McSweeney, Jason 

Moreno, Kelley Nee, 

Nyryan Nolido, Maura 

O'Brien, Jill O'Connell, 

Andrea Osborne, Marie 

Phan, Marisa Ross, 

Meredith Rugg, Sarah 

Satkevich, Edward Smith, 

Stephanie Sprague, Mark 

Stanton, Andrea Stevens, 

Katelyn Sweetser, 

Shannan Whalen, 

Christopher Wilkie, Bai 

Zhu, Mariarme Blaikie, 

Timothy Brown, Jennifer 

Calkins, Lily Chan, Vivian 

Chan, Erica Crawford, Eric 

Dickens, Cuong Diep, 

Sarah Downing, Amy 

Drysdale, Jay Emerson, 

Jessica Esdale, Jennifer 

Faye, Jill Fishman, Erin 

Flaherty, Stephan Gildea, 

Rebecca Gordan, Teuta 

Hajrizaj, Susan Haydar, Ciavarro, 

Ashkan Hedvat, Carolyn DeMaggio, 



Jarvie, Dianne Kane- 
McGunigle, Tina 
Var<!arilcas. Alex Lam, 
Tommy Leung, Melissa 
Lord, Lynne MacOnochie, 
Kelly Magnuson, Jon 
Mahoney, Lauren 
McLellan, Janine Miller, 
Jinkee Pacifico, Jill 
Picardi, Kosanna Poon, 
Laura Powers, Kathryn 
Guinn, Amanda, Rork, 
Laura Shea, Erica Smith, 
Susan Solimini, Michael 
Starr, Katherine Sullivan, 
Maureen SulUvan, FeUcia 
Tam, Jennifer Tantillo, 
Wendy Trafton, Jimmy 
Wan, Melody Wass, 
Cindy Wong, Annie Yu, 
Wingsze Yuen, Mei Zhen. 
Honors 
Corey Awed, EUzabeth 
Boc, Matthew Breheny, 
Vincent Chiu, Lai Chow, 
Brian Correia, Robert 
Delaney Michael 
Dempsey, Patricia Dixon, 
Scott Finn, Paul Foley, 
Adam Goodrich, Sarah 
Hennessy, Patrick Kane, 
Kathleen Keleher, Jennifer 
Kenneally, Katherine 
Kesaris, Benjamin 
Kettleson, Aimee Kivior, 
Quentin Lam, Jessica 
Linskey, Sinead Lovett, 
Brian Luc, Carole 
MacLeod, Steven Marks, 
Leanne Martin, Ryan 
McGurl, Michael 
McLaughlin, Denis 
Murrphy, Matthew 
Penella, Viet Phan, Alexis 
Pivnicny, Sarah Proto, 
Elizabeth Stone, Jimmuy 
Tan, Adam Tiro, Sarah 
Towne, Danielle Archer, 
William Armstrong, 
Nicole Bertone, Sarah 
Beston, Andrew Bisconte, 
Thomas Caldwell, Sean 



Nichole, 
William 



Domcnii M. SH'ci 
f:\'c Physiaiii] m 



■lilUi, MD 



Deshler, Irvin Diaz, Jared 
Downey, Jason Dunbar, 
MaryBeth Feeney, 
Courtney Gorczyca, James 
Griffin, Brian Hughes, 
Michelle Jodrey, 

Katherine Johnson, 
Michael Keenan, Mark 
Kelly, Adam Knowles, Jia- 
Leang Lam, Bryan 
Linskey, Joseph Linskey, 
Jennifer Look, Johnny Ly, 
Michelle McCarthy, 
Michael McEvoy, 
Matthew McLoughlin, 
Meghan O'Brien-Ali, 
Samantha Peatridge, 
Gregory Peck, Vincent 
Pivnicny, Andrew 
Risitano, Erin Rooney, 
Nawal Saffarini, Bethany 
Savela, Colin Shea, 
Michael Stockdale, Ka 
Toye, Kenneth Tse, 
William Walker, Elaina 
Wong, Peter Wong, Mark 
Belanger, Jennifer 
Bradford, Lisa Bragg, Kari 
Brown, Gregory Burke, 
Ryan Catarius, Laurie 
Costello, Paul Daley, 
Christopher Davis, Mark 
Demeo, Scott Doherty, 
Susan DriscoU, Warren 
Eyring, Pamela Farrell, 
John Ferraro, James Finn, 
Ryan Herlihy, Peter 
Hogan, Nakema Howard, 
Michael Johnston, James 
Keyes, William Kwong, 
MeUssa Lingoes, Outtara 
Ly, Daniel Macheras, 
Joseph Meighan, James 
Melchin, Courtney 
Mitchell, Christopher 
Moody, Meaghan Powers, 
Anna Quach, Tanya 
Ritchie, William 

Robinson, Elizabeth 
Rudolph, Robert Schwartz, 
Bridget Shaughnessy, 
Kathleen Swanton, Sean 
Tirrell, James Wong, 
Steven Zero. 



July 15-21» 

1921 
72 Years Agi> 



k(/i nud Sui'^^con 



We have 
moved, but 
our focus 
hasn't 
changed! 



Currenily accepting new patients. 



Dr. Domenic Strazzulla and 
his staff are pleased to 
announce the relocation of 
their ophthalmic offices. We're 
in the same building, on the 
same floor — our offices have 
just moved around the comer! 
Our address and phone 
number remam the same. 

This move will allow us to 
better serve our patients with 
state-of-the-art, quality eye 
care in a more spacious and 
comfortable environment. 



Domenic M. Strazzulla, MD 
Crown Colony Office Park 
500 Congress Street 
Suite lA-1 
Qumcy, MA02169 
(617)770-1505 



Providing state-of-the-art 
eye care, now and into tfee 
future: 

■ caiaraci surgery 

■ lens implants 

• in*office laser surgery 

■ treatment for ^ucoma and 
diabedc eye disease 

Dr. StrazziMa k a board certified 
aphdidtruiia^t. 



ance fixxn Assistant Secre- 
tary (Franklin D.) Roosevelt 
that no charge would be made 
at present in the status of 
Squantum Victory plant," said 

Frothingham in a telegram to ' '' 

Neal. 

Eaiiier, Neal charged that valuable machinery from 
Squantum plant was being shipped to Norfolk, Va., a move 
that would seriously cripple the ainlity of the Victory plant 
to function as a repair base. 

Neal and Chamber Secretary Alfined N. LaBreque claimed 
that the removal of the machinery was the first step to 
dismantle the plant and move fiiOue repair work to bases in 
the south. 

More than 2,500 men could be employed at the Squaittnm 
plant if it were properly used, said Neal. In 24 hours it could 
be made ready to haixlle 54 destroyers and a like number of 
submarines. 

CUTBACK AT FORE RIVER 

General Manager Sam Wakeman of the Bethlehem Steel 
Co.'s Fore River Shipyard said that a curtailment of Navy 
spending on ship work will result in the layoff of about 2,500 
men at the yard. 

The remaining 2,000 workers, it was said, will be work- 
ing only five days a week and five hours a day from 7 a.m. 
to 12 nooa 

"We are finishing our last merchant contract, which 
should be dehvered during the current month, and we have 
taken no new contracts," said Wakeman. "Our general 
policy in laying off men will be to cause the smallest amount 
of hardship." 

Two major naval vessels were under construction at Fore 
River, the battleshq) Massachusetts aiKi the scout cruiser 
Lexington, which were contracted for two years ago. But 
Uttle work has been done since the keels were laid. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Seventy-five "shell shocked" soldiers from West Roxbury 
Veterans Hospital were the guests of Delecevare King at 
Kampkliff . . . Thomas F. Plummer, son of the former 
principal of the Woodward School, was appointed to West 
Point by Vice President Calvin CooUdge . . . Boneless pot 
roast was21 cents a pound at the Quincy Public Market, 1464 
Hancock St., next door to Bahr's Music Shop . . . The Rev. 
John J. Casey, ciuate at St. John's Church for 23 years, left 
for East Pepperell to become pastor of St Joseph's Church 
. . . Capt. John F. Hall, Capt. George A. Wardwell and 
Wilham M. Edmonston formed a committee to enlist at least 
10 Quincy boys for the Citizens MiUtary Training Camp at 
Camp Devens in August . . . The name of Quincy was 
replaced by Granite in the new telephone book as a result of 
installation of the new automatic exchange in Boston . . . The 
County Commissioners set Sept 12 for a hearing into a 
proposal to establish a sitting for the Superior Court in 
Quincy . . . Shirts were marked down to 65 cents at Remick 's, 
"the Wide Awake Store," in the music hall block ... A 
motion for a new trial was filed in Dedham on behalf of 
Nicola Sacco and BatolcMneo Vanzetti, convicted of slaying 
a payroll messenger and a guard in a $ 1 6,000 holdup in South 
Braintree ... A flagpole on the lawn of the Adams Birthplaces 
was splintered by a Ugbtning boU ... A Miltcxi man was fined 
$15 in Quincy District Court for sitting with a giri in an 
unlighted car parked on Furnace Brook Parkway but the fine 
was revoked when he proved that the girl was his wife . . . 
Members f the Harwitzer Co. of the Ninth Infantry at Camp 
Devens were treated to an ItaUan dinner of spaghetti, roumaine 
salad and "rouge vino" prepared by Tobin Emperrate . . . 
Hamburg steak was two pounds for 25 cents at Melville's 
Market, 606-610 Washington St., Quincy Point . . . "God's 
Country and the Woman," was playing at the Alhambra 
Theater, were the prices were 1 1 cents from 1:30 p.m. to 5 
p.m. and 25 cents from 5 p.m. to 10:30 pjn., was tax 
included. 



Page 6 OiiineySiita Ybu^^iy,' 'July tS, 1^3 



Cancer Society Unit Installs 
Officers, Recognizes Volunteers 



Officers of the South 
Shore Unit of the 
American Cancer Society 
for 1993-94 were installed, 
and outstanding volunteers 
honored at the recent 
annual meeting of the unit, 
which provides volunteer 
service in the fight against 
cancer in nine area 
communities, including 
Quincy. 

Officers installed are: 

Rose DiPietro of 
Quincy, director of Home 
and Health Resources, 
Braintree, president; John 
Reed, principal of 
Business Solutions, 
Braintree, vice president; 
Dr. Walter Kagan of 
Hingham, medical 
director; and Eileen 
Cooney of Quincy, 
secretary. 

A special presentation 
was made to DiPietro for 



her outstanding leadership. 
Awards went to Fr. Bill 
McCarthy, Quincy, 
outgoing vice president; 
Marty Paul, Brockton, 
outgoing income 

development chair; and 
Paul Cushner, Weymouth, 
outgoing public education 
chair. 

Dr. Kagan received 
special recognition for 10 
years' service to the 
American Cancer Society. 
For her Daffodil Days' 
fund-raising achievement, 
Pauline Sweeney, Quincy, 
received an award, as did 
Barbara Nermoe and Julie 
Lacey of Hingham, for 
organizing a golf 
tournament at the 
Cohasset Golf Club. 

Receiving certificates 
for exceptional service 
were: Eileen Cooney, 



Elizabeth Kirke, Norwell; 
Kathy Zalis, Randolph; 
Susan McVeigh, Cohasset; 
Carol Rizzo, Quincy; 
Osbonje Ingram, Cohasset; 
and Barbara Tilden of the 
South Shore Hospital staff. 
Cited as outstanding 
volunteers were: Donna 
Nealon, Braintree; Mark 
Kowalski, Weymouth; 
John Reed; Denise 
Valentine of Braintree 
Medical Associates; 
Patricia Brice, Hingham; 
Esther Remick, Quincy; 
and George Baker, South 
Weymouth. 

Volunteers of the 
Cancer Society carry on 
programs of public and 
professional education, 
information and referral, 
patient visitation and 
transportation service on 
the South Shore. 




Children's Developmental 
Disabilities Center Open House 



QUINCY RESIDENTS, fk-om left, Eil^n Cooney, Pauline Sweeney, Rose DiPietro and 
Fr. William McCarthy, were recently honored for their volunteer service to the South 
Shore Unit of the American Cancer Society. Sweeney's Daffodil Days program was 
again tops in the state; Cooney was elected unit secretary, DiPietro unit president; and 
Fr. McCarthy stepped down as unit vice president. 



NQAT Presents Toland 
Memorial Scholarships 



Children's Develop- 
mental Disabilities Center, 
105 Adams St., Quincy, 
will hold an Open House 
Tuesday, July 20 from 9:30 
to 11:30 a.m. 

Parents of a child with 
a disability or work with 



children who may be in 
need of services are 
invited to drop in. Parents 
may tour the facility, see 
the center's programs in 
operation and talk with 
staff. 

The Children's 



Mr., Mrs. Charles Bunker Parents 

Charles "Chip" and Harvard St., Quincy, are 
Jean (Libby) Bunker, 130 parents of a son, Charles 



PERMANENT HAIR REMOVAL 



* Confidential & Comfortabk 
Atmosphere 

* Complinientary Consultation 
& Brochures 

* Disposable Probes 

• Shortwave, Blend, 
Galvanic Methods 

* Days, Evenings, 
Saturday Appointments 

• Reasonable Rates 

• Women, Teens & Men 

• Free Parking 




CRKISTINI SARDENA 

R.(imi«d EketiolagiM & hitnictor 



Christine's Electrology Center 



1073 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY 

^ Near Quincy Center T & Expvi/y 



786-16201 




Developmental Disa- 
bilities Center is a 
program of Cerebral Palsy 
of the South Shore Area. 

Those planning to attend 
the open house should call 
479-7980. 

Of Son 

Nicholas Bunker, born 
June 17 at St. Margaret's 
Hospital, Boston. 

Maternal grandparents 
are Mr. and Mrs. Roland 
Libby of Onington, Me. 
Paternal grandparents are 
Charles and Joan Bunker 
of 15 Sealund Rd., Quincy. 



SAVE GAS 

AND MONEY.. 

SHOP LOCALLY 



Two North Quincy High 
School recent graduates 
have been presented $400 
in scholarships from the 
North Quincy Alumni 
Theatre. 

Tanya Kutasz, who will 
attend the California 
Institute of Technology; 
and Tracy O 'Sullivan, who 
has enrolled at Ithaca 
College, received the 
scholarships which were 
taken from the proceeds of 
last summer's production, 
"Rumors." 

"Over the past six 



years, we have awarded a 
total of $3,100 in 
scholarships," said Carol 
Steeves, chairperson of the 
NQAT Executive Board. 
"We look forward to 
continuing the tradition of 
presenting the Gregory P. 
Toland Memorial 
Scholarship." 

The NQAT will 
presented "Lend Me a 
Tenor" July 16, 17; July 
22, 23, and 24; and July 
29, 30 and 31 at 8 p.m. at 
the Black Box Theatre, 
North Quincy High School, 



316 Hancock St., North 
Quincy. This 

year's show will assist 
1994 graduates. All 
proceeds will benefit the 
scholarship fund. 

NQAT receives funding 
from local businesses that 
advertise in the playbill as 
well as patrons who attend 
the show. Anyone wishing 
to make a contribution to 
the Gregory P. Toland 
Memorial Scholarship 
Fund may send it to North 
Quincy Alumni Theatre, 
P.O. Box 92, WoUaston, 
MA 02170. 



'Friends Of The Unborn' Fundraiser July 31 



Maggie Bellotti's fifth 
annual fundraiser to 
benefit "Friends of the 
Unborn Homes" will be 
held Saturday, July 31 
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 



120 Hillside Ave., Quincy. Donation is $25 per 

The Rev. Michael adult and contributions 

McNamara will celebrate may be sent to Sabina 

a Mass at 11 a.m. It will Kavanagh, 80 Clay St., 

be followed by a buffet at Apt. 618, Quincy, MA 

1 p.m. and pool party. 02170. 




RECEPTION HALLS 



ISTYUSH120-SEATEF 

DBCOVEREDNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

TH0U6HTT0BE 

AMBJA'S. 

Thcscift'jouL 

function room «t Amelias 

has become one of Boston's 

most popular spoti for wed 

dings, shou«rs, coiporate 

meetings, and get togethen 

of aU k^s. We feature an 

I extensive menu at affordable 

prices. We cwerkxik Marina 

Bay and the Boston skyline. 

\Ue'd like to make your next 

functxxi really fly. 

h Please caD61747114S3. 



i 



MELIA 



^ictorv Rd. Na Quincy. MaI 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



INVITATIONS & FAVORS 



15% off on Invitations 

E & T CERAMICS & 
PRINTING 

516 SEA STREET - QUINCY 

(617)479-4107 

Ask atxMl our Custom Made Favors i 
Cent0ip»ces for all Occasions 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



'Photografyfiy 



Mcint' 



re's 

Studio 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6886 



Mr., Mrs. Michael Ford Parents Of Son 

Kim Ann Ford and Michael Joseph Ford Jr., Weymouth. 

Michael J. Ford, 915 born June 24 at South Maternal grandparents 

Southern Artery, Quincy, are Richard and Marcia 

are parents of a son. Shore Hospital, Walsh of Quincy. 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



tographs with engagement annonncesaeate aes it 
always has. 

The Sun will also continue to use in wedding 
announcements the names of all uiemh>ei^ of the 
wedding party includiag maid or matroa of honor* 
best man. par«ttt»^ biidfesmaids, vtstms, fkmet 

We invite eo^ged coulples to s^Mt tiiidis 
photos mtk tbm aiuK)«ncementg.iii>d wlieii swb- 
sultmgtlieirweddlagphototoiiKltKieaa^ 
ii$tiag0fa)ewedaiagp«rty. : 

caii$oiiV4»ti&0$|<>9lorjpiiQto$totda^ast^ ; 
fofpoblicatkia but theplioiolose«9ome<5UBlly to 
flieproces*. 
We mgf^t Mt when you hm^ y<m tuptfut- 

mem photo taken, you requeslthe$ta!io to send a 
copy to The Sun witin the remia4ier that The Sun J* 
<Jonttouiiig its policy of publishing engageoaent 
photos. 

The Sun also publishes articles and phQtos of 
^tWd^i^ anniversaries beginning with the :25th 
Wairvwary. 



BEAUTY & SKINCARE 



ELECTRIC BEACH 

Tanning Center 

11 Pai1<ingway 

Quincy Center 

472-5256 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



^OLSOn F»ne Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 
The Coletti Family Al- Dave -Mark 
730 HANCOCK ST.^W0LLASTON 02170 786-7942 




STACIA ANN GALVIN of North Qulncy led the Qass of 
1993 academic procession at the Aquinas College at 
Milton recent commencement. Galvin was chosen by 
her classmates to lead the graduates as class marshal. 
She received her associate degree in medical assisting 
and also was vice president of her class. 

Rice Eventide Home 
Adds Three Directors 



The William B. Rice 
Eventide Home o^' Quincy 
recently added Robert 
Guarnieri, Peter J. 
Macdonald and Michael E. 
McFarland, all of Quincy, 
to the Board of Directors. 

Guarnieri is president 
and CEO at Colonial 
Federal Savings Bank in 
Wollaston. He is a 
member of the Mass. 
Society of CPAs, 
American Institute of 
CPAs, past president of 
the Quincy Rotary Club, 
and director of both the 
New England League of 
Savings Institutions and 
the South Shore Y.M.C.A. 

Macdonald is senior 
partner at Hale and Dorr in 
Boston, and is a member 
of the American Bar 



Association, Mass. Bar 
Association, and Boston 
Bar Association. 

McFarland is owner of 
Barry's Deli in Quincy. 
He is a member of the 
Quincy Rotary Club, 
Quincy Partnership, 

Quincy 2000, Mass. 
Restaurant Association, 
and National Restaurant 
Association, a trustee of 
The Quincy Historical 
Society, and a board 
member for both the 
Bridgewater Credit Union 
and the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce. 

The William B. Rice 
Eventide Home is a non- 
profit, charitable 
retirement and nursing 
home located at 215 
Adams St.. Quincy. 




MR. and MRS. DAVID McGOUGH 

(Pagar Studios) 

Linda Caporale Wed 
To David McGough 



Four Residents Receive 
Tufts University Degrees 



Four Quincy residents 
recently graduated from 
Tufts University. 

They are: 

Daniel Yuk-Kong Ang, 
59 Hamden Or., master of 
science degree in 
electrical engineering. 

Stephen Peter Maloney, 
28 Avon Way, bachelor of 



aits degree in Spanish. 

Mohamed Mtet, 45 Ebn 
St., master of science 
degree in electrical 
engineering. 

Deanne Marie 

DeSantis, 115 Main St., 
bachelor of science degree 
in mechanical engineering. 



Christine Karvelis On 
North Adams Dean's List 



Christine Marie 
Karvelis, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Anthony P. 
Karvelis of Quincy, has 
been named to the Dean's 
List for the spring semester 



at North 
College. 



Adams State 



Linda Caporale, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Caporale of 
Quincy, was recently 
married to David 
McGough. He is the son of 
Mr. David McGough of 
Duxbury and Mrs. Janice 
Phinney of Whitman. 

The Nuptial Mass was 
celebrated at St. John's 
Church in Quincy and 
officiated by Rev. William 
McCarthy. A reception 
followed at Lombardo's in 
Randolph. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. 

Cheriann Murphy of 
Quincy served as Maid of 
Honor. 

Bridesmaids were 
Donna Caporale, Carol 
Concannon and Janet 
Faiella, all of Quincy and 
sisters of the bride; and 
Patti Dauksevicz of 
Hanover and Kathie 
Benton of Whitman, both 
sisters of the groom. 
Flower Giils were Brittany 
Concaimon and Amanda 



Faiella, both of Quincy 
and nieces of the bride. 

Sean Downey of Quincy 
served as Best Man. 

Ushers were Bill 
McGough of Whitman, 
brother of the groom; Bob* 
Faiella and John 
Concannon, both of 
Quincy and brotbeis-in-law 
of the bride; and Paul Dion 
and Jim Twomey, both of 
Whitman. 

The bride, a 1986 
graduate of Quincy High 
School, is an agency 
, service representative for 
Arbella Mutual Insurance 
Co. 

The groom, a 1984 
graduate of Cardinal 
Spellman High School in 
Brockton and the 
University of 

Massachusetts in Boston, 
is a claims adjuster for 
Arbella Mutual Insurance 
Co. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Hawau, the 
newlyweds are living in 
Rockland. 



A member of the Class 
of 1995, Christine is 
majoring in math. 



Mr., Mrs. Greg Hanley 
Parents Of Daughter 



Greg and AnnMarie 
Hanley of 32 Shed St., 
Quincy, are parents of a 
daughter, Kerri-Ann, bom 
June 24 at Newton- 
Wellesley Hospital. 

Maternal grandparents 
are Daniel and Annamay 



Sullivan of West Roxbury. 
Paternal grandparents are 
Morton and Rosemarie 
Hanley of South Boston. 

The Hanleys are also 
parents of a son, John 
Francis, 17 months. 



Michelle Hart On 
Newbury Dean's List 

Michelle Hart of legal secretarial 
Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's List at 
Newbury College for the 
spring semester. 
Hart is majoring in 



Russell Kdward's 



Thursday, July IS, 1993 Qaincy Son ¥»gi 7 

Edith Mariano Receives 
Simmons Degree 

Edith Fagerlund 
Mariano, daughter of 
Elmer K. Fagerlund of 
Quincy, recently received 
a master of science degree 
in health care 
administration from 
Simmons College in 
Boston. 

Mariano, who plans to 
pursue her M.B.A. degree 
at Simmons in the fall, 
will be employed by 
Brigbam and Women's 
Hospital as the technical 
director of quality 
assurance and compliance. 
She received a bachelor of 

science degree from the Mariano and her husband 
University of Vermont, reside in Braintree. 

Kathleen Fewer In 
Nursing Honor Society 




EDFTH MARIANO 



Kathleen Fewer of 
Quincy has been elected 
to membership in Sigma 
Theta Tau International 
Honor Society of Nursing. 

She was recently 
inducted as an 
undergraduate student 
member of Gamma 
Epsilon Chapter at 
Northeastern University. 

Sigma Theta Tau 
International is a 
prestigious organization of 
leaders and scholars in 
nursing. This honor 
society, founded at Indiana 
University in 1922, 
currently has over 300 



cb^ters at more than 356 
colleges and universities 
woridwide. 

Membership in the 
Society is awarded to 
bachelor's, master's, and 
doctoral nursing 
candidates who achieve 
high scholastic averages, 
and to graduates of college 
programs who achieve 
excellence in nursing 
leadership roles. 
Undergraduate inductees 
must have at least a 3.2 
grade point average on a 
4.0 scale and be in the 
upper one-third of their 
class. 



Mr., Mrs. Anthony Agnitti 
Parents Of Son 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony son, Amando Louis, 4. 
Agnitti of Quincy are 

parents of a son, Anthony Grandparents are 

Louis, bom July 5 at Amando and Gina Agnitti 

Brigham and Women's of Braintree, Elsa Curto of 

Hospital in Boston. New York and the late 

They also have another Louis Curto. 




Summer Clearance 

25-50% Off Selected Items 

Think of Us for Shotvers and Weddmgsl 

OPEN YEAR ROUNfD 

Open Tues.-Sat. 10-5, Qosed Sundays k Mondays ^ 

853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 




LOVE IS 



i^m 




a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 



SpMk to RHa -- thc't our ranlat aflani 
• p«cl*llzing In complatt wedding 
(MCkag* plan* and all oltwr occaatont 
Tha Qoldan Lion Sullt accomodala* up 
lo 300. Tha Vanallan Room up to 140 
guatlt. Gl>a RHa a call lor an 
appotnlmanl lor your raaanraHon. Na« 
brochurot ara a>aMaWa 

(Air CondHlonad) 

CALL 

Quincy Soin of Italy Social CeiHer 

12* O"""? Sirert, Ouin^y- MA MIM 

NEWNl'MiERl»472-! 




*>-^ Fcatunng 
Bobby Sontag 
Chuck Palmer 

Melissa Eaton 
C raig Jones & Maik Vanderwat er 

SPECIAUZING IN WEDDINGS 

AND ALL OCCASKDNS 
TJ£E best DJS AND SINGING 
ENTERTAINERS AVAILABLE 

(617) 748-8471 

FOR CLUBS OR PRIVATE PARTIES 



:^<^ (/--^/l€^ 

A full service hair salon 

MONDAY ^^^^^ 

Women's Special $20.00 

TUES&THURS 

Men's Special $13.00 

WEDNESDAY 
Perm Special 

starting at $42.00 Nan Tipping & overlay $60 

All specials Include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 

REDKEN KMS ^^MS prulmitcrell ymatfix 

472-1060 

* Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 15, 1993 




New England storyteller 
Diane Edgecomb will 
present "SeaWaves and 
Storyshells" for children 
age five and older and 
adults Tuesday, July 20 at 
7 p.m. at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library. 

The program is funded 
by the Quincy Arts 
Council. 

Edgecomb will present 
a collection of original 
stories, beloved sea tales, 
participation stories and 
lighthearted pieces. 
Haunting sea tales are part 
of the evening's enjoyment 
as well. 

Edgecomb has made 
several appearances at the 
library and has been 
entertaining young and old 
alike with nature 
storytelling for almost a 
decade. She is well known 
throughout the Northeast 
where she has appeared at 
festivals, schools and 
libraries. She has appeared 
at Three Apples 
Storytelling Festivid, the 
Museum of Science, 
Boston's World Trade 
Center, Me and Thee 



NORTH QUINCY ALUMNI Theatre will present "Lend Me a Tenor" July 1«, 17, 22, 23, 
24, 29, 30 and 31 at North Quincy High School at 8 p.m. Cast includes, front row from 
left, Judith Austin, Christine Carroll, Jodie Rufty and Jill Preston. Back row, James 
Phelan, Michael Kilkelly, Ashot Gheridian and Patrick Kilkelly. 

North Quincy Alumni Theatre 
To Present 'Lend Me A Tenor' 



DIANE EDGECOMB 

Coffeehouse and at First performances by Alicia 



Nights in Vermont and 
Massachusetts. Nationally, 
she's been recognized by 
Storytelling Magazine. 

TTie summer storytelling 
series will continue with 



Quintano July 27, Derek 
Burrows Aug. 3, Carol 

Duhamel Aug. 10, and the 
Poobley Greegy Puppet 
Theater Aug. 17. 



Kids' Fair Aug. 14 
At Jack N' Jill Center 



The North Quincy 
Alumni Theatre (NQAT) 
will present Ken Ludwig's 
farce, "Lend Me a Tenor" 
for three consecutive 
weekends on July 16, 17; 
July 22, 23, and 24; and 
July 29, 30, 31. 

The play, directed by 



Jack 'n' Jill 
Kindergarten and Child 
Care Center will sponsor a 
Kids' Fair Saturday, Aug. 
14 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
at the center, 39 Station 
St., West Quincy. 

Rain date is Aug. 21. 
All proceeds will 
benefit the Braintree 



crafts tables, a bake sale 
and other food aiKl treats. 

Admission and parking 
are free and there is a 
small charge for each 
game. 

For directions, call the 
center at 773-4515. 

Established in 1945, the 
Jack 'n' Jill Kindergarten 
and Child Care Center 



Mid- Week Concert 
Series Continues 
At Bethany July 21 



School for Brain Injured ^^^ ^^^^ ^y ^^ 
Children. The event will ^^ ^.j^^j^ ^^ programs 
feature face painting, for children ages six weeks 
games and pnzes, raffles, though six years. 



Edmund Aluisy, 
clarinetist and Elizabeth 
Hodges, pianist wiU be the 
featured performers at the 
third free Mid-Week 
Concert Wednesday, July 
21 at 12:15 p.m. at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center, 

The concert series is 



being presented through 
the collaboration of 
Friends of Bethany and 
Scarborough Productions. 

Tours of the church are 
open to the public 
Wednesdays from 10 a.m. 
to 2 p.m. A light lunch is 
available following the 
concert for $2.50. 



NOW! 

A Complete Laser Video Disc 
Library At Your Fingertips 
If you have a laser disc player 
you can now easily select any 
disc in print by joining our club. 
Members receive our current 385- 
page catalogue listing over 7,000 titles 
which are dis- 
counted 10 per 
cent. 

Order now and 
receive a ifree copy 
of Laser View 
Magazine (a $2.50 
value) with your 
first laser disc or- 
der. 
Send only $6.25 (includes tax) 

plus $1.95 for shipping to: 

Laser Sights, P.O. Box 3392, 
Boston, Ma. 02101. 

(Allow 2 to 4 weeks for delivery) 




HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

It's not just 'Purdy' good, 
it's the best" 

Everything made on premises 

68A Billings Road 
N. Quincy MA 

472-8558 



Frank Moffett, will be 
performed at 8 p.m. in the 
Black Box Theatre at 
North Quincy High School, 
316 Hancock St. Tickets 
are $7 for general 
admission and $6 for 
students and senior 
citizens. 

Free parking is 
available in front of the 
high school, which is 
located near the North 
Quincy MBTA Red Line 
station. 

"Lend Me a Tenor" 
takes place on the biggest 
night in the history of the 
Cleveland Grand Opera 
Company. For this night, 
a world famous tenor is to 
perform his greatest role at 
the gala season-opening 
performance which the 
general manager hopes 
will put Cleveland on the 
operatic m^. The tenor is 
late in arriving and the 
play progresses in a 
hilarious series of mishaps. 

The cast includes 
James Phelan as Max; Jill 



Preston as Maggie; 
Michael Kilkelly as 
Saunders: Ashot Gheridian 
as Tito Merelli; Christine 
Carroll as Maria; Patrick 
Kilkelly as the Bellhop; 
Jodie Rufty as Diana; and 
Judith Ausin as Julia. 

Now in its seventh 
season, the NQAT 

continues its annual 
tradition of using the 
proceeds from the show to 
benefit the Gregory P. 
Toland Memorial 
Scholarship Fund. 
Previous productions 
include: "Lovers and 
Other Strangers" (1987), 
"A Shot in the Dark" 
(1988). "Brighton Beach 
Memoirs" (1989), "Noises 
Off" (1990), "Perfect 
Timing (1991) and 
"Rumors" (1992). 

Tickets may be 
reserved in advance by 
calling 984-8998 or may 
be purchased at the door 
beginning at 7:15 p.m. on 
:ach performance night. 



Cerebral Palsy Benefit 
Softball Tournament 



Cerebral Palsy of the 
South Shore will sponsor 
its annual men's, women's 
and co-ed Invitational 

slow-pitch, double 
elimination softball 
tournament in Quincy on 
Friday, Sept. 17 through 
Sunday, Sept. 19. 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



The tournament will be 
held at five local fields: 
Rotary, Kincaide, 
LaBreque, Welcome 
Young aind O'Rourke. 

Registration fee is $150. 
All proceeds will help 
support CP's Children's 
Develq}mental 
Disabilities Center in 
Quincy. 

For more information, 
call the CP Center at 479- 
7980. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



WED&THURSJULY14&15 

Jason Scott Lee 

"DRAGON-THE BRUCE LEE 

ST0RY"(PG-13) 

EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 16 

Stephen Rea-Jaye Davidson 

•THE CRYING GAME" (PG) 

An AduK Drama 
FRI & SAT 7:00 4 9:15 

SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



MON & TUES DOLLAR NIGHT 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



Accent On Good Buys, Good Entertainment 



Thnrsday, July 15, 1993 Qolncy Sun Page 9 



Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival Opens Today 



The 23rd annual Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival 
with the accent on good 
buys and good family 
entettainment, opens today 
(Thursday) for a three-day 
run through Saturday. 

The event, sponsored by 
the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association, will be held 
on Hancock St. which will 
be closed off to vehicular 
traffic between Granite 
and School Sts. 

Shoppers again will be 
able to leisurely stroll 
down Hancock St. looking 
over merchandise on the 
sidewalk in front of 
participating stores. 

Entertainment and other 
activities are scheduled for 
10 a.m. to 9 p.m. today and 
Friday aiKi from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Saturday. 

Opening ceremonies 
with Mayor James Sheets 
will be held today 
(Thursday) at 10 a.m. 

Over 70 canopied 
booths wiU dot Hancock 
St., giving it a festival 
appearance for the three 
days. Nearly 50 QCBPA 
member stores and 
businesses will participate 
along with other 
organizations. 

Two stages will be set 
up on Hancock St. where 
entertainers and musical 
units will perform. Stage A 
will be in front of the New 
England Deli and Stage B 
in front of Colman's 
parking lot. 

Musical units will 
include the Quincy Alumni 
Band, the Roma Band, the 
Yardrockers Blues Band 
and the Trailside Coffee 
House Bands. 

New features this year 
include the Mime Circus, 
the Scarborough Chamber 
Players, New England 
Wildlife animal show, 
Young People's Theatre, 
Multicultural Food Fair, 
Greek dancers, a visit by 
Bart Simpson, and a nine- 



bole miniature golf course 
There will also be a 
drug sniffing dog from the 
Norfolk County sheriff's 
office, a Quincy 
firefighters demonstration, 
karate exhibitions, pony 
rides, children's ferris 
wheel and merry-go-round, 
marionette puppets, a 
magician and clowns. 

Among those with 
exhibit booths will be the 
Navy Shipbuilding 
Museum, National Park 
Services, Quincy Tourism 
Association, Quincy 
Police Crime Prevention 
Bureau, Quincy Recycling 
Committee, Quincy 
Hospital and Quincy 
Visiting Nurse's 
Association. 

Scheduled events 
include: 

THURSDAY 
Opening ceremonies, 10 
a.m. 

Quincy Police Crime 
Prevention Booth, 10 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. 

Scarborough Chamber 
Players, 10:15 a.m.. Stage 
A 

New England Wildlife 
Show, 10:15 a.m.. Stage B. 
Stephen Brenner, 
magician, noon. Stage A. 

Masters of Self Defense 
Demonstration, 1 p.m.. 
Stage A. 

Young People's 
Theatre, 1:30 p.m., Stage 
A 

Norfolk Country 




FAMILIAR SCENE -This year's Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival which opens today (Thursday) is expected to 



draw a large turnout similar to the one shown here last 
year. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Sheriff's drug and alcohol 
awareness program, 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Quintessential Brass, 3 
p.m.. Stage A. 

Matthias Lupri Vibe 
Jazz Trio, 3:30 p.m.. Stage 
B. 

Cara Scanlon, 

musician, 5 p.m., Stage B. 

Don and Peter Cluet, 
musicians, 6 p.m.. Stage 
B. 

Yardrockers Blues 



Band, 7 p.m.. Stage A. 

Quincy Alumni Band, 
7:30 p.m.. Stage B. 
FRIDAY 

Michael Wald, 
magician, 10 a.m.. Stage 
A 

Discovery Puppets, 10 
a.m.. Stage B. 

Art Show, Frantic 
Framers, all day. 

Discovery Puppets, 11 
a.m.. Stage A. 

Magician, 11 a.m., 



Stage B. 

Fairy Circus, noon. 
Stage A. 

Marionette Puppets, 1 
p.m.. Stage A. 

Trailside Coffee House, 
Bruce Nutting, musician, 2 
p.m., Stage A. 

Shira Block, Tarot 
readings, noon to 9 p.m. 

Mime Circus, jugglers, 
sing- along, musicians. 3 to 



6 p.m. 

Norfolk County Sheriff 
Department drug and 
alcohol awareness 
program, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Trailside Coffee House, 
Bruce Nutting, musician, 
6:30 p.m., Stage A. 

Steve Berardinelli, D.J., 
country music, 7 p.m., 
Stage B. 

(Cont'd on Page 10) 



Aicardi's Lunch 

under new ownership 
Special 

Small coffee and a Bagel for 99^ 

We Offer: 

• Luncheon Specials 

• Muffins, Danisl-i & Coffee 
• Balloons 
I 1515 Hancock St. . Quinc v 773-2899 




HANLON'S SHOES 

Ammmmll 

20-70% Off 
Selected Items 

Thurs., July 15th to Sat., July 17th 



HANLONS 



27B Cottage Avenue, Quincy 



R 



SO0 



S 



tVie 



Y^ot<^^ 




1/2 PRICE SALE 
MANUFACTURER'S CLOSEOin'S 

CHINTZ UNLINED FISHTAIL SWAGS MINI PRINT 

3 PIECE SWAG SETS 54X40- Umg $1 5 QQ 3 pjgcE SWAG SETS 

70X40- i«,g $20.00 *"M0.00 
Natural Only *='" $12.00 

Extra Valances $4.00 
Blue, Gre«n, Rose 



H2.00 
63" 

assorted colors 



M 



QUINCY CENTER 

1489 HANCOCK STREET 

OPEN DAILY 

9:30-5:30 

THURS. EVENING TIL9:00 

NORTH RIVER PLAZA 

PEMBROKE 

MON., TUBS., SAT. 9:30-6:00 

THURS., FRI., 9:30-9:00 

SUNDAY 12-5 



Annual 
Sidewalk Sale 

Bargains! Bargains! Bargains^ 



fmim ^Qm 



1630 Hancock St., Quincy 



471 -2220 



Page 10 Quincy Son Thursday, July IS, 1993 



Hancock St. Closed 
72 Hours For Festival 



Hancock St., from 
Granite St. to School St. 
will be closed to vehicular 
traffic for 72 hours during 
the Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival. 

Police Chief Francis 
Mullen, implementing a 
city ordinance, ordered 
that section of Hancock St. 
closed off at 10 p.m. last 



night (Wednesday) until 
10 p.m. Saturday. 

The area will be a "no 
paiidng tow zone" during 
the 72 hours. 

The festival opens 
today (Thursday) and will 
continue Friday and 
Saturday. 

Activities each day will 
begin at 10 a.m. They will 
end around 9:30 p.m. today 



and Friday and at S p.m on 
Saturday. 

Hancock St. will be 
allowed for the 72-hour 
period to allow traffic fi^e 
time for bringing in and 
setting up amusement 
rides, two stages, over 75 
booths and equipment and 
for dismantling them when 
the festival is over. 



Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival Opens Today 



{Cont'd from Page 9) 

Private Issues, 

musicians, 7:30 p.m.. 
Stage A. 

The Many, musicians, 8 
p.m.. Stage A. 

SATURDAY 

Forbes School of Irish 
Step Dancers, 10 a.m.. 
Stage A; 11:30 a.m.. Stage 
B. 



Peter Jae Dancers, 10 
a.m.. Stage B. 

Greek Dancers, 1 p.m., 
Stage B. 

Roma Band, 1:30 p.m.. 
Stage A. 

Trailside Coffee House, 
2:30 p.m., Stage A. 

Palmas Dancers, 2:30 
p.m.. Stage B. 

Project Concert 
Dancers, 3 p.m.. Stage B. 



J. P. Jones, musician, 
3:30 p.m., Stage A. 

Norfolk County Sheriff 
Department's drug and 
alcohol awareness 
program, all day. 

Carl and Ken Olson, 
musicians, 4 p.m., Stage 
A. 

Karaoke, 4 p.m.. Stage 
B. 



Sidewalk Festival Committee 



Kathy Missell of 
Infinity Books is chairman 
of the QCBPA Promotions 
Committee that planned 
the Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival. 

Other committee 
members are: 

Cynthia Arabasz, South 



Shore Bank; Henry 
Bosworth, The Quincy 
Sun; Elspeth Brown, 
Boston Five Cent Savings; 
Richard Carriger, Pilgrim 
Restaurant; Joanne Falco, 
Great Cuts; Deanna 
Gazarian, Phase II 
Jewelry; William Morrill, 



Creative Fairs; Caryn 
Smith, Caryn's Comer and 
Paul Sturm an, Frantic 
Framers. 

The committee was 
assisted by QCBPA 
Executive Director Eileen 
Cohen. 



Baskint^Robbins 



Hot Bjdge Sundae! 




BRENNAN'S 

fine tobacco • cigarettes • lottery 

Name Brand Cigarettes 
Only $2.21 per pack + tax 

Many Brands as low as 
$ 1 .45 per pack + tax 




I 



Hours: Mon-Sat 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sun 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Two conv0nl0nf locations 

1442 Hancock St . 1255 River St 

Quincy Square Cleary Square 

61 7-786-8610 Quincy Square 

6 1 7-36 1 - 1 444 Cleary Square, Hyde Parle 




THE MIME CIRCUS, one of this year's Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival features, will 
perform Friday from 3 to 6 p.m. on Hancock St. 




l»ADTICIf»Atll«l MifH:^ANT$ 







mKwtmmwm wmtmim 
mmmam MBiMirs 



'^iiiiiiiiiiiiiwnr ; wiiM^^miem mmmtrnm 
;:iiiiiliiiiiMi6AaKic. mmmm . oiHisiJ^iit:: . 






:i?|Wiif-- 





PARADE 

OF SHOES 

Sidewalk Summer Sale 

Savings up to 



50 9{ 



C 

Fashion Leather 
Footwear for Women 

HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY 



Thnnday. July 15, 1993 Qnlncy Son Page 11 



\ 



QUINCY CENTER 
SIDEWALK FESTIVAL 

July 15th, 16th & 17th 

DAILY SIDEWALK FESTIVAL EVENTS 

THURSDAY - JULY 15 - 10 AM-9 PM HISTORICAL THEME 



OfficM Opening Ceremonies with Mayor James Sheets 
Continental Cat)levlslon Live Broadcast 
Quincy Police Crime Prevention Booth 

Sponsored by Woolworth's 
Quincy Recycling Booth 

Sponsored by Caryn's Comer 
Scartx>rough Chamber Players 
New England Wildlife Show 

Live Animal Show 

Sponsored by Anodyne 
Stephen Brenner - Magician 

Sponsored by Barry's In The Square 
TraHside Coffee House 

Bruce Nutting - Musician 

Sponsored by Ounldn Donuts 
Norfolk County Drug Sniffing Oog Demo 
Shira Block - Tarot Readings 
United States Navy ShipbulMIng Museum 

Sponsored by Fleet Bank 
Quincy's Histork; Sites Booth 

Sponsored by U.S.N.S.M. 
Natkxiai Park Servk» and Quincy Tourism Booth 
Quincy Firefighters Demo 
Pepsi Challenge 

Pony Rides • St. Morttz Equestrian 
WJDA Live Broadcast 
Bart Simpson 

Sponsored by Infinity Books 
Quincy Hospital A QVNA 

Bkxxl Pressure Testing 
Masters of Self Defense Demo 
Young People's Theatre 

Children's Plays 
Ferris Wheel, Ball Bath, Dunk Tank, SIkto, Moonwalk, Speed Pitch, 

Train, Roller Rink, and Nine Hole Miniature Golf Course 
WATD Live Broadcast 
Norfolk County Sheriff Dept. 

Drug and Alcohol Awareness Program 
Quintessential Brass 

Sponsored by Creative Fairs 
Matthias Lupri Vibe Jazz Trio 

Sponsored by Quincy 2000 
Cara Scanlon - Musician 

Sponsored by Murphy, Kligman & Company 
Don and Peter Cluet - Musicians 
Yardrockers Blues Band 

Sponsored by Joe's Pub 
Quincy Alumni Band 

Sponsored by Johnson Motors 



10 AM 
All Day 
10AM-SPM 

All Day 

10:15 AM 
10:15 AM 

11:30 AM 
12 Noon 

12 Noon 



12 Noon 

12 Noon-9 PM 

All Day 

All Day 

All Day 
All Day 
All Day 
All Day 
All Day 
All Day 

All Day 

1PM 
1:30 PM 

All Day 

All Day 
10AM-5PM 

SPM 

3:30 PM 

6PM 
7PM 

7:30 PM 



Stage A 
Stage B 




Stage A 
Stage A 



Stage A 

Stage B 

Stage B 

Stage B 
Stage A 

Stage B 




UINCY 

CENTER 

BUSINESS AND 
PROFESSIONAL ASSOC. 




FRIDAY - JULY 16 - 10 AM-9 PM CHILDREN'S DAY THEME 



Mk:haeiWakl-Magteian 10 AM Stage A 

Sponsored by Peter O'Connell 
Discovery Puppets 10AM StageB 

Sponsored t>y Meineke Muffler 
Art Show AM Day 

Sponsored by Frantk: Framers 
Continental CableviskxiLhw Broadcast AHDay 

Quincy Recycling Booth AHDay 

Sponsored by Caryn's Comer 
Discovery Puppets HAM StageA 

Sporwored l>y Sweeney Funeral Servtee 
MkrhaelWaM-Magtoian HAM StageB 

FairyCircus 12Noon StageA 

Martonetle Puppets 1PM StageA 

Sponsored by Massina Enterprises 2PM StageA 

TraiiaMa Coffee House 12Noon StageB 

Brace NutUng - Musteian 

Sporaored by Amity inauranoe 
Shira Block -Tarot Readings 12l4oon-9PM 

United Stataa Navy Shipbuiding Museum AIDay 

Sponaored by Flaat Bank 
Quincy's Hiatoric Silas Booth AIDay 

Spon8or«lbyU.S.N.S.M. 
NaltonalPwfcServtoa and Quincy Touriam Booth AIDay 



Pepsi ChaNange 

Pony RMaa • St Moritz Equestrian 

WJDA Uva Broadcast 

BartSimpaon 

Sponsored by Infinity Books 
Quincy Hoapital ft QVNA 

Bkxxl Praesura Testing 
Mime Orcua, Jugglers. Smg-atong. Musteians ft Mora 

Sponsored by Bugm PMnar ft PreeUents Place 
Ferris Wheal, Brt Balh, Dunk Tank, Side. Moonwak, 

Speed PItoh. Tram. Rder Rink, and Nine HoW 

MIniaturaQolf Course 

Norfok County Sharttt Oepl 
Drug and Ak»hol Awaranaaa Program 

TrMsMa Coffee House 

Bruoe Nulling -Musician 

Sponsorad by RhMrd P. Bany. Esq. 
Sleva BerwtmeM. J. - Country Musk; 

Sponeorad by South Shore Bank 



Sponsored by Faxon TnMl 

1 1^9 ^H^VlW ^"l^^^^^^^P ■• 



SATURDAY - JULY 17 - 10 AM-5 PM MULTICULTURAL THEME 



Fdrbas School of Mah Slap Danoera 

Sponaored by The MuWcuNural Aaaoc. 
Paler Jaa Dancers 

Sponaored by Pro te st ant Social Sarvloea Bureau 
ConUnanlal CaMavWon Uva Broadcaat 
Quincy Poica Crime P rsvantton Booth 

Sponaored by Woolwonh'a 
Quincy Racydng Booth 

Spcineorsd by Caiyn'a Comer 
Joey Ctoema • ftoe pataang 

Sponeorad by Bamle's fonnal 
Forbes School of Msh Slap Dancers 

Sponeorad by The MuWcuNural Aaaoc. 
Maalers of Self Oetansa Demo 
Shira BkMk - Tarot Raadkigs 
Paler Jaa Dancers 

Sponeorad by Prolaelant Social Sarvtoas Bureeu 

Greek Oanoars 

Sponeored by Cokmial 1600 Raalaurant 
UnMed Stalaa Navy Shipbuldbig Muaeum 

Sponeored by Fleet Bank 
Quincy's HMortc suae Booth 

Sponaored by U.S.N.S.M. 
Nattonal Parte Sarvtoa and Quincy Tourtam 



10 AM 

10AM 

AlOay 
AlOay 

AlOay 

AlOay 

11:30 AM 



SlagaA 
StageB 



Stages 



Papal Chalanga 

Pony RIdaa • St Moftiz EquaeMan 

WJDA Uva Broadcast 

BartSimpaon 

Sponeorad by Infinity Booka 
Quincy HoapM and OVNA 

Blood Praaaure reeling 
Roma Band 

Sponeorad by The Quincy Sone of Italy 
TnMde Coffee Houee 

Bruoe NuWng- Musician 

Sponsored by FMan's flaetaurant 



12Noon StageA 
12 Noon-9 PM 
1PM StageA 



1PM 
AlOay 
AlOey 
AlOay 



SlagaB 



Sponeorad by The MuMcuNural Aaaoc. 
Protect Conoam Oanosra 

Sponsored byThaMuMouNural Aeaoc. 
J.P. Jonea - lAieiolan 
Ferrte Wheal, Bel BaX. DwkTank. SMe, 

Speed PMoh. Tram. Rolar RMc and Nine 

MmMuraQolf Course 
Nortok County Sheriff Oapt 

Drug and Ak»hol Awarsnaaa 
Cwl vid Kan Oleon - Muaidana 
Karaoke 



AIDay 




AIDay 




AIDay 




AIDay 




AIDay 




3PM-6PM 




AIDay 




10 AM-5 PM 


6:30 PM 


StageA 


7PM 


StageB 


7:30 PM 


SlagaA 


6PM 


StageA 


AlOay 
AlOay 
AlOay 
AlOay 




AlOay 




1J0PM 


StageA 


2:30 PM 


SlagaA 


2:30 PM 


SlagaB 


SPM 


SlagaB 


3:30 PM 
AlOay 


SlagaA 


AlOay 




4PM 
4PM 


StageA 
SlageB 



Page 12 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 15, 1993 



Obituaries 



Mary E. Gorman, 62 

Retired Teacher For Air Force 



A funeral Mass for 
Mary E. Gorman, 62, of 
Quincy, a teacher for the 
Air Force for 33 years, was 
celebrated July 9 in St. 
Ann's Church. 

Mrs. Gorman died July 
7 of cancer at Milton 
Medical Center. 

She became a teacher 
with the Air Force in 1955. 
During her 33 years of 
teaching military 
dependents, she taught in 
Japan, Morocco, Germany 
and several other 
countries, including 
Turkey, England, Italy and 
Saudi Arabia. 

She taught classes fro 
kindergarten through Grade 
12, and became an 
administrator, including a 
stint as a superintendent 
for a number of military 
schools in a region. 

She got her students 
involved in projects such 
as caring for animals and 
tending gardens in addition 
to their class work. She 
also got together with 
other teachers to write 
plays for students and 
worked closely with 
parents. 

Before signing on with 



the military, she taught 
two years in a Medford 
elementary school. 

After her retirement. 
Miss Gorman moved to 
Quincy in 1989. 

Bom in Buffalo, N.Y., 
she was raised in Medford. 
She graduated from Girls 
Catholic High School in 
Maiden where she was on 
the debating team. 

She received her 
bachelor's degree at 
Lowell State Teachers 
College in 1952 and later 
earned a master's degree 
at Boston State College. 
She was a member of the 
National Honor Society in 
high school and college. 

She is survived by her 
mother, Mary E. 
Cunningham of Cohasset; 
a sister, Ellen Harding of 
Braintree; and four 
nephews and nieces. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery, Randolph. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St., Wollaston. 

Donations may be made 
to Hospice of the South 
Shore, 100 Bay State 
Drive, Braintree, 02184. 



Dawn E. Brown, 25 

Quincy College Student; In Shooting 



Helen P. Sullivan, 76 

Retired Audit Clerk 



A funeral Mass for 
Dawn E. Brown, 25, of 
Quincy, will be celebrated 
today (Thursday) at 10 
a.m. in Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Miss Brown died July 
11 after a July 10 shooting 
in Quincy. She was killed 
by an armed assailant 
outside of her parents' 
home on Royal Street. 

A 1985 graduate of 
North Quincy High School, 
she was a former student 
at Quincy College and 
planned to pursue a 
nursing career in New 
Jersey. 

She is survived by her 
parents Donald P. and 
Virginia F. (Boyle) Brown 



of Quincy; a brother, 
William L. Cannon of 
Abington; four sisters, 
Kimberlee A. Brown of 
Quincy, Elaine F. Cannon 
of Randolph, Phyllis C. 
Ahern of Virginia and 
Virginia M. Suozzo of 
West Peabody; her aunt, 
Phyllis McCabe; her 
fiance, Mitchell Goldstein 
of New Jersey; four nieces 
and nephews and two 
cousins. 

Burial will be in St. 
Mary's Cemetery. 

Visiting hours were 
scheduled for yesterday 
(Wednesday) from 2 to 4 
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at the 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 
74 Elm St. 



Dorothy Snyder, 75 




A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

Through the years we have 

always shown sensitivity to 

the needs and desires of the 

families we have served...We 

have felt through the years 

SCOTT DEWARE that the confidence and 

friendships of the people we have served is the t)est 

and only proof available that we at DEWARE have met 

these demands... 

Through the years we have believed that how we 
conduct ourselves WrTHIN OUR WALLS In under- 
standing, sympathetic and intellectual guidance, 
thoughtfulness and unmatched service is our primary 
concern...Through the years we have consistently 
believed in the Top Line of Sensitivity" and not in the 
"Bottom Une of Doiiarsl"...Through the years we 
have always been truthful in answering any and all 
questions concerning ourcosts/services/facilltlesand 
merchandise. We have always believed that it is our 
responsibility to provide a range of prices and services 
that provide exactly what the needs and preferences 
of the consumer prefer. Over the years our service 
shows a remarkable consistency of economy. The 
many, many families of ail faiths we have been privi- 
leged to serve will confirm this... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the 'New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Service Rendered to Any Distance 



A funeral Mass for 
Dorothy (Calnan) Snyder, 
75, of Quincy, was 
celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) in St. Ann's 
Church. 

Mrs. Snyder died July 
10 at South Shore Hospital 
in South Weymouth after a 
long illness. 

She was bom in (Juincy. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Harold Snyder; a 
daughter, Beverly A. 



Ahola of Pembroke; a 
brother, Thomas "Sonny" 
Calnan of Arlington; two 
sisters, Mary Snyder of 
Braintree and Mildred 
DePesa of Norwell; and 
five grandsons. She was 
the mother of the late 
Mildred Payton. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 



Frieda L. Bencks, 93 



A funeral service for 
Frieda L. (Pearce) 
Bencks, 93, of Quincy, 
was held Tuesday in the 
Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 

Mrs. Bencks died July 9 
at the Eventide Home in 
Quincy after a long illness. 

Bom in Dorchester, she 
attended school in Boston 



American Heart 
Association 



MONUiMENTS 



Cemetery Lettering 

Cleaning 

Vases 

Vigil Lights 

Sculpturing 

Rose Quartz 

Mausoleums 

Markers 

Colonial Tablets 

Stant Markers 

Bronze Markers 




and lived in Hyannis for 33 
years before moving to 
C^iincy in 1980. 

Wife of the late 
William G. Bencks, she is 
survived by two nephews 
and a niece, August H. 
Menslage of Braintree, 
Robert P. Menslage of 
California and Gladys E. 
Bates of Munro, N.H. 

Burial was private. 

Donations may be made 
to the Shriners Burns 
Institute, 55 Blossom St., 
Boston, MA 02114. 



617-471-0250 



QUINCY 
MEMORIALS Inc. 

iSWillardSt. 
Quincy 02169 

"On The Expressway" 
Exit 9 Near E. Milton Sq. 

Free Illustrated Catalog 
Budget Terms Available 



A funeral Mass for 
Helen P. (Sullivan) 
Sullivan, 76, of Quincy, a 
retired audit clerk at 
Jordan Marsh, was 
celebrated July 10 at St. 
John the Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Sullivan died July 
7 in Baltimore -fter a brief 
illness. 

Bom in South Boston, 
she attended Boston 
schools. She moved to 
Quincy in 1962. 

She worked at Jordan 
Marsh for 27 years and 
retired in 1991. 

She was a 

communicant of St. John 
the Baptist Church, 
Quincy. 

Wife of the late Edward 
F. Sullivan, she is survived 
by five sons, Michael 
Sullivan of New York 
City, Timothy Sullivan of 
Seattle, John Sullivan of 
Abington, Emmett 



Sullivan of Houston and 
Christopher Sullivan of 
North Attleboro; four 
daughters, Gabrielle 
Demeule of Baltimore, 
Suzanne Ballard of Silver 
Spring, Md., Sylvia 
Villarreal of Houston and 
Dierdre Murphy of Quincy; 
three brothers, Thomas P. 
Sullivan and Francis X. 
Sullivan, both of South 
Boston, and Edward J. 
Sullivan of Quincy; two 
sisters, Katherine Lyman 
of South Boston and Mary 
Louise Kostecki of 
Halifax; 22 grandchildren 
and many nephews and 
nieces. 

Burial was in Pine 
Grove Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave., Quincy. 



George H. Hutt Sr., 77 

Retired Quincy Fire Lieutenant 



A funeral Mass for 
George H. Hutt Sr., 77, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday in Sacred Heart 
Church. 

Mr. Hutt died July 9 at 
Holmes Regional Hospital 
in Palm Bay, Ra. 

A former lieutenant in 
the Quincy Fire 
Department, he retired in 
1981 after serving in the 
department for 30 years. 

He was an Army 
veteran of World War II. 

Bom in Fall River, he 
lived most of his life in 
Quincy before moving to 
Palm Bay three years ago. 

Husband of the late 



Marion (Diloreto) Hutt, he 
is survived by a son, 
George H. Hutt Jr. of 
Hingham; a daughter, 
Virginia Gallagher of 
North Conway, N.H.; a 
brother, William Hutt of 
Hudson; three sisters, Rita 
Murphy of Lexington, Julia 
Moore of Quincy and Mary 
Schneiderhan of 

Washington; a friend, 
Dorothy McAdams; and 
five gnmdchildren. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



John R. Lehtonen, 51 

Retired Shipfltter 



A funeral Mass for John 
R. Lehtonen, 51, of 
Quincy, a retired shipfitter 
at the Fore River shipyard, 
was celebrated July 9 in 
St. John the Baptist 
Church. 

Mr. Lehtonen died July 
6 in Quincy Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

Born in Boston, he 
lived most of his life in 
Quincy. 

He worked at the 
shipyard for five years and 
retired many years ago. 

He was an Air Force 
veteran of the Vietnam 



his 
E. 
of 



War. 

He is survived by 
former wife, Joan 
(Barrett) Lehtonen 
Quincy; a son, Michael P. 
Lehtonen of Quincy; his 
mother, Helena C. 
(Conroy) Lehtonen; and a 
brother, Albin F. Lehtonen 
of Abington. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery, 
Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave., Quincy. 



^ \ " '■[ M ^ '^ *> ^ XX 



S weeney JBrv ikers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 



RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR, 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 



1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY. MASS. 



472-6344 



J 



CHn^STIAN DIOR • SOPHIA LORE.'; S JOAN COLLINS • VUAHNET S PIEHHE CAKCIN 



Fashion 

Eyewear 

SAVE 

*35 



J\% OPTICAL & JI 

• jD« hearing aids^ 

1361-AHancockSt.,QuincySq. 4|li 
773-3505 • 773-4174 



^A-r $499 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 

H»l «;TnN • AVANTr.ARnF 



ol jg^l 



• *yeS ?A'NT I AIIRFMT 



Ruth M. O'Hara, 87 

Retired School Teacher 



A funeral Mass for Ruth 
M. O'Hara, 87, of Quincy, 
a retired school teacher, 
was celebrated July 8 in 
Sacred Heart Church. 

Miss O'Hara died July 5 
in Colonial Nursing Home, 
Weymouth. 

She was a Boston 
public school teacher for 
44 years before retiring in 
1971. She taught at Juha 
Ward Howe in Roxbury 



and the Lucy Stone School 
in Dorchester. 

Bom in Newton, she 
was a 1927 graduate of 
Boston Teachers College. 

She was the sister of 
the late Sally Donahue. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St.. Wollaston. 



Gertrude A. Ruggles, 87 

Hospital Dietary Worker For 20 Years 



A funeral Mass for 
Gertrude A. (Cleary) 
Ruggles, 87, of Quincy, 
was celebrated Monday in 
Most Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

Mrs. Ruggles died July 
8 at Plymouth Manor 
Nursing Home. 

A former dietary worker 
at Quincy City Hospital, 
now Quincy Hospital, she 
worked there for 20 years 
before retiring in 1968. 

She was born in 
Maiden. 

Wife of the late 



Lawrence H. Ruggles, she 
is survived by a son, 
Richard Ruggles of 
Nashville, 111.; two 
daughters, Hope Love of 
Peach Tree City and 
Lynda Degreco of 
Plymouth; 12 

grandchildren and 12 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Katherine V. MacPherson, 81 



A funeral service for 
Katherine V. MacPherson, 
81, formerly of Quincy and 
a former grocery store 
salesclerk, was conducted 
July 8 in the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St., 
by the Rev. Richard 
Brondyke of the Fort 
Square Presbyterian 
Church. 

Miss MacPherson died 
July 3 at Carney Hospital 
in Dorchester. 

A native of Prince 



Edward Island, Canada, 
she was a former resident 
of 1000 Southern Artery in 
Quincy. 

She is survived by a 
nephew, Donald Nicholson 

of Quincy; and a niece, 
Irene McKenna of Canada. 

She was the sister of 
the late Mary Pratt of 
Hingham. 

Burial was in Belfast 
Cemetery, Prince Edward 
Island. 



Ermalinda Lacerenzo- 
Flashman, 61 



A funeral Mass for 
Ermalinda "Lena" R. 
(Ceriani) Lacerenzo- 
Flashman, 61, of Quincy, 
a retired nurse's assistant, 
was celebrated July 10 in 
St. Mary's Church. 

Mrs. Lacerenzo- 
Flashman died July 7 in 
Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Jamaica Plain 
before moving to Quincy 
47 years ago. 

She worked at Quincy 
Hospital for 23 years and 
was the employee of the 
month for March, 1986. 
She received the 
Outstanding Service 
Recognition Award in 
1989, the year she retired. 

She was a member of 
the Sons of Italy. 

Wife of Albert 
Flashman and the late 



Paul P. Lacerenzo, she is 
survived by four sons, 
Damien LeVangie of 
Braintree, James 
LeVangie of Bedford, 
Harvey Flashman of West 
Bridgewater and Barry 
Flashman of Indianapolis, 
Inc.; a daughter, Lillian 
Flashman of Whitman; a 
brother, Charles Ceriani of 
Braintree; two sisters, 
Mary Ceriani of Wellesley 
and Rose Ceriani of 
Beverly; and eight 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave., Quincy. 

Donations may be made 
to QVNA Hospice 
Program, 1354 Hancock 
St., Quincy, 02169. 




Religion 



St. Joseph's Church 

Undergoing Renovation, 

Restoration Project 



St. Joseph's Catholic 
Church, 550 Washington 
St., Quincy Point, is 
undergoing a major 
renovation and restoration 
project. 

The program consists of 
repainting the entire 
church interior, resurfacing 
the floors beneath the 
pews, installing new 
memorial pews and 
recarpeting the aisles, 
sanctuary and vestibules. 
A handicap access ramp 
will also be built on the 



side entrance-way near the 
handic^ parking zone. 

The restoration program 
is underway and is 
expected to be completed 
by Aug. 15. During this 
period, parishioners are 
attending Mass in the air- 
condiuoned G.T. Nickerson 
Center (Parish Hall). 

The interior design for 
the church renovations was 
done by Envisions Inc. of 
Quincy under the direction 
of Martha Jones. 



Bethany Congregational 



Rev. Elden Zeurn, 
minister of Wollaston 
Congregational Church, 
will be guest minister at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
Quincy Center. 

His sermon topic will 
be "Living By The Spirit." 

Scripture reader will be 



Sylvia Hofsepian. Music 
will be by Pauline 
Anderson with Gregory 
Flynn, organist. Greeter 
will be Doris Folger. 

Hostesses for the 
fellowship hour following 
the service will be Doris 
Allen and Dorothy 
Mersereau. 



Thursday, July 15, 1993 Qnliicy Son Page 13 

Lisa Mirasolo 

St. Joseph's 

School Principal 

St. Joseph's Elementary 
School, 22 Pray St., 
Quincy Point, announces 
the appointment of its new 
principal, Lisa Mirasolo. 

Mirasolo has been on 
the faculty of St. Brigid 
^School in South Boston 
and has also previously 
taught at St. Francis de 
Sales in Charlestown and 
Sl Angela's in Mattapan. 

She received her 
master's degree in 
education administration 
from the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston 
in 1992 and her bachelor 
of arts degree from Boston 
State College in 1977. 

Mirasolo succeeds Sr. 
Anne Judge, S.N.D., who 
served as principal of St. 
Joseph's School from 1980 
to 1993. Sr. Anne Judge 
has accepted the position 
of principal at St. Patrick's 
School, Roxbury. 

St. Joseph's Catholic 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



A ceremony of the 
renewal of marriage vows 
will be performed during 
the 9:30 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church, 310 Manet Ave. 

Graeme and Priscilla 
Marsden, who will be 
married 20 years on July 
28, will be attended by 
their children, James, 17, 
Emily, 14 and Martha, 11. 

Dr. Peter V. Corea and 
Rev. M. Alicia Corea will 
conduct the service. Dr. 
Corea's will preach on 



"Faith, Hope And Love 
Redefined." Christine 
Prendergast will sing urKler 
the direction of organist 
Arden Schofield. Ralph 
and Ada Freeman will 
serve for the Diaconate. 
Greeter will be Ron 
Lemieux. 

Following the service, a 
coffee hour hosted by 
Gayle Mackay will be 
held in the Conference 
Room. A special cake for 
the Marsdens will be 
served. 



United Methodist 



Lay Speaker Robert 
Shaffer will give the 
sermon "You Can't Afford 
the Luxury of a Negative 
Thought" Sunday at the 10 
a.m. worship service at 
Quincy Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St., Wollaston. 

Scripture reader will be 
Mark Torrance. Greeters 
will be Phyllis Hawes and 




LISA MIRASOLO 

School has an enrollment 
of 240 children from pre- 
kindergarten to grade 8. 
The year the school will 
open a pre-kindergarten 
class for four year olds. 
The school also offers an 
after-school care program. 

St. Joseph's is currently 
accepting applications for 
enrollment at all grade 
levels. Call the school 
office at 773-8080 for 
registration information. 



Annual Chris Peter 
Blood Drive July 20 



The ninth annual Chris 
Peter Blood Drive will be 
held Tuesday, July 20 from 
2 to 8 p.m. at St. Aquinas 
Hall, Darrow St., Houghs 
Neck (behind Most 
Blessed Sacrament 
Church). 

There will be signs from 
Southern Artery (Rte. 3A) 
to the donor site. 

The event, which 



benefits the American Red 
Cross, is held in memory 
of Chris Peter of Houghs 
Neck, who was killed by a 
diunk driver in September 
1984 at the age of 22. 

Babysitting and 
homemade goods will be 
available. For more 
information or for an 
appointment call Charles 
or Tnidy Peter at 471-9586. 



Houghs Neck Legion 
Post Presents Awards 



Helga Strong and ushers 
will be Kay and Susan 
Little. 

Hostessing the 
fellowship hour in the 
Susanna Wesley Hall will 
be Grace Shields, Millie 
McHugh, Francis Blair 
and Janet Shields. 

Music will be provided 
by Choir Director Scott 
Walker. 



Houghs Neck American 
Legion Post No. 380 
presented awards recently 
to Angela Hogrell and 
Severino Tan, eighth grade 
outstanding students at 
Broad Meadows Middle 
School. 

At the high school 
level, ROTC awards 



include the First American 
General Military Award 
presented to Cadet 
Colonel Brian LaRouche, 
and the Second Scholastic 
Achievement Award to 
Cadet Peter Kwok. 

Presentations were 
made by Post Commander 
James Fratolillo. 



A 



United W^ 

II bringi oullhebnl in all of us 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



Quincy Hospital Managers Meeting 

The Quincy Hospital Committee meeting will 

Board of Managers will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed 

meet Tuesday, July 20. by the full board meeting 

The Finance at 7:30p.m. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Hera's a chance to earn 
extra money by tMjIlding a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St, Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 1 1 am, 

5 12:30 and 5:30 pm 

CwTfessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 
\L Rectoiy-21GaySt. 773-1021^ 



^1 SUBSCRIPTION fORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK A*»D MAlltO 



Lcy 



a£ 



a^x 



1372 HANCOCK STREET. QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME. 



STREET 
CITY 



.STATE- 



2IP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



L 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.0d 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) CHECK ENCLOSED 
( ) PLEASE BILL ME 



J 



Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door with personal- 
izedj measurable adverti- 
sing to: • 
• 

• Engaged Couples 
■ • flew Parents 
< Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usuaRy by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood. Wa- tell them all 
about y0%r, business. 
Interested? Calf for more 
iletails: 

BHbir«NMiQ(M«i)daz 
^4r9-25fi7 



li^^ 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 15, 1993 



Sun Sports 



Legion Baseball 



Morrisette Moves Into 
Zone 6 Penthouse 



The defending 

champion Morrisette 
Legion baseball team 
moved into first place in 
Zone 6 with a 4-2 victory 
over Randolph Monday 
night, improving its record 
to 8-2-2. 

Morrisette will be home 
to Quincy Friday night at 
8:30 at Adams Field and 
will host Milton next 
Tuesday at 8:30 at Adams. 

Five teams are in the 
running for the three top 
state playoff spots as only 
four points separate the 
five teams, Morrisette, 
Braintree, Weymouth, 
Milton and Randolph. 

Sean Donovan pitched 
Monday night and pitched 
a five-hitter, settling down 
after a slow start as he 
allowed three hits and 
three runs in the Hrst 
inning. He allowed only 
two more hits, walked one 
and struck out six. The 
Defense played well and 
came up with its 14th 
double play of the season. 

Morrisette got a run 
back in the second when 
Serge Belcastro tripled 
and scored when the relay 
throw got away. Hits by 
Pat Shea and Donovan 
were wasted on a disputed 
double play call for 
interference. 

Morrisette went ahead 
to stay in the fourth on two 
hits, a walk and a sacrifice 

fly. 

Dave Reinhart walked. 
Jay Schnagel hit a ground 
rule double and Belcastro 
doubled. Tom Malvesti 
sacrificed Belcastro to 
third and be scored on 
Adam Calvert's sacrifice 

fly. 

Shea had a one-out 
triple in the fifth but was 
left stranded. In the sixth 
Belcastro, who has been 
swinging a hot bat, 
singled for his third hit. 

Last Saturday night 



Morrisette defeated 
Wollaston, 7-3, after 
Wollaston had taken a 2-0 
lead in the first on Duane 
Holmes' 400-foot homer 
over the right-center field 
fence at Adams Field. 
Mark Swirbalus had 
singled off starter and 
complete game winner 
Mike Patch before Homes' 
homer. 

Morrisette scored a run 
in the bottom of the first 
without a hit on walks to 
Shea and Brian Hayes and 
a wild pitch. 

Morrisette sent eight 
batters to the plate in the 
third and scored three runs. 
Robbie Kane walked, 
Shea singled and Kane 
scored on an infield out. 
Reinhart singled to drive 
in Shea, Reinhart stole 
second and scored on 
Belcastro's single. 

Wollaston added an 
unearned lun in the fourth 
on hits by Sirbalus and 
Charlie Rozanitis and two 
errors. 

Morrisette scored a run 
in the fifth on Shnabel's 
triple and an RBI single by 
Belcastro. It added two in 
the sixth, both unearned, 
on a single by Calvert, a 
bunt single by Kane, a 
three-base error and a wild 
pitch. 

Patch and WoUaston's 
John Russell pitched well. 
Patch allowed six hits, 
struck out four and walked 
one, while Russell, going 
S 2/3 innings, allowed 
eight hits, struck out five 
and walked four. 

Morrisette rolled over 
Canton, 10-2, in a rain- 
shoitened five-inning game 
with pitcher Matt OToole 
improving to 3-0 along 
with a tie and dropping his 
ERA to 1.60. He allowed 
three hits and struck out 
seven. 

Morrisette was paced 
by Kane's double and two 



singles and three runs 
scored. It scored four runs 
in the first, four more in 
the second, one in the 
third and another in the 
fifth. 

Hayes had two hits and 
two RBI, Shea went 2-for- 
3 and scored twice, 
Belcastro belted a two-run 
homer over the left field 
fence, Reinhart singled in 
a run and Malvesti and 
Calvert walked with the 
bases loaded for two more 
nins. 

In an exhibition game 
against East Hartford, last 
year's Connecticut and 
Northeast Regional 
champion, Morrisette 
dropped a 5-4 decision. 
East Hartford had 
eliminated Morrisette from 
the Regionals. 

Dan Duncan pitched 
well for seven innings and 
Malvesti pitched the 
eighth and ninth, giving up 
two hits and no runs. 

Earlier Morrisette lost 
to West Roxbury, 3-1, in a 
well-played gamed 
featuring fine pitching. 
Morrisette self-destructed 
as W. Roxbury scored 
twice without a hit in the 
fifth to break a 1-1 tie. 

Donovan pitched a 
complete game and 
allowed just one hit, a 
double in the fourth after a 
leadoff walk. He walked 
four and struck out seven. 
One one W. Roxbury run 
was earned. 

Roxbury' pitcher Mike 
Hauck was equally as 
tough as he allowed four 

hits, struck out seven and 
walked one. 

The lone Morrisette run 
came in the first when 
Kate beat out an infield hit 
and scored on Hayes' 
double. Hayes was thrown 
out trying for third based. 
A Reinhart double was 
wasted. 



Quincy Coming On 
After Slow Start 



After getting off to a 
slow start, (0-4), the 
Quincy Legion baseball 
team has won five of its 
last eight games for a S-7 
record. 

Seven of the 12 games 
were decided by one run 
with Quincy winning three 
and losing four. 

Two of the losses were 
in games in which Quincy 
led (Braintree and Hyde 
Park) in the first inning. 
Quincy won its last three 
games, defeating Hyde 
Park, 3-2, and sweeping a 
doubleheader from 
Wollaston, 3-2 and 11-6. 

In the Hyde Park game 



Dan Burke pitched a two- 
hitter, striking out 11 and 
going all the way. George 
Wirtz had broken a 2-2 tie 
in the fourth inning, 
singling in Steve Miller. 

In the first game against 
Wollaston Terry Gaide 
pitched 6 2/3 innings of 
one-hit ball only to tire in 
the seventh after allowing 
Wollaston to tie the game. 
Burke came in to get the 
final out with the bases 
loaded. 

Wirtz drove in Steve 
Provost, who had reached 
on an error and moved to 
second on a walk to 
Miller, with the winning 



run. Scott Kelly pitched an 
excellent game for 
Wollaston. 

In the nightcap Tim 
Byrne pitched a complete 
game, scattering seven 
hits and striking out five. 

Wollaston jumped out 
to a 3-2 lead in the first 
but Quincy came back to 
tie it in the third, added 
three runs in the fourth, 
two in the fifth and three 
in the sixth. 

Provost, Miller, Mark 
Karlson, Tom Nutley and 
John Gladu had two hits 
each. 

Mike Caporale, Brian 
(Cont'd <mPa^ 15) 




REGINA MURPHY of North Quincy High lias accepted a volleylHill scholarship to Yale 
University. She is shown signing her letter of intent with assistant principal Eileen 
Feeney, left, and coach Jim Rendle. 

Murphy Going To Yale 
On Volleyball Scholarship 



Regina Murphy, outside 
hitter for the North Quincy 
High state champion girl's 
volleyball team, has 
selected Yale University 
to continue her athletic 
and educational careers. 

Regina, a four-year 
starter for North Quincy, 
was also considering 
Brown and the University 
of Vermont but decided to 
accept Yale's scholarship 
offer. 



During her years at 
North Quincy, she led her 
team to two state 
championships and won 
many individual honors 
including two Old Colony 
League all-star selections, 
two Patriot Ledger all- 
scholastic selections, two 
Boston Herald and two 
Globe all-scholastic 
selections. 

Tri-captain of the past 
season's volleyball team. 



she was also tri-captain of 
the girls' basketball team. 
This past season she was 
also named a Patriot 
Ledger all-scholastic in 
basketball. 

A member of the 
National Honor Society, 
Regina was also president 
of the Student Union. 

She is the daughter of 
Betty and Patrick Murphy 
of Wollaston. 



Softball 



Liberty Runs Win 
Streak To 18-0 



Liberty Lounge, the 
only unbeaten team in the 
Quincy Men's Softball 
League, improved its 
record to 18-0 in the C 
Division to move to within 
three of the league record 
(21 straight wins). 

Liberty overpowered 
NoU Electric, 19-3, with 
pitcher Bob Hennelly 
improving his record to 9- 
0. 

Pitcher Kevin Nestor 
matched Hennelly with his 
ninth straight win as 
Liberty topped Accent 
Upholstery, 11-1. 

Fowler House of the A 
Division topped 

Washington Tap of the B 
Division, 15-5, for its fifth 
straight win and its sixth 



straight over the Tap 
dating back to last season. 
Pitcher Jim Buhl was 
the winner and added two 
hits. Larry Taglieri went 4- 
for-5 with three RBI. Bruce 
Tobin made the play of the 
game, a diving catch of a 
long drive to rob Charlie 
Hicks of extra bases. He 
also had two hits. Jay 
DeBartolo, Ken Markum, 
Steve Constas, Fran 
Connell, Rick DeCarlo 
and Rob Bums had a hit 
each. 

Fowler House also 
edged Alumni Cafe, 2-1, 
with two runs in the 
bottom of the seventh. 

Markum started with 
winning rally with a walk 
and he moved to second 
on DeBartolo's long 



sacrifice fly. He advanced 
to third on a hani-to-handle 
shot by Tobin off the first 
baseman and scored the 
tying run on Bums' single 
to left. Bill Chase then 
drove in the winner with a 
hit down the left field line. 

For Alumni Rick 
Radzik pitched a solid 
game and Frank Reynolds 
and C.J. Bell had two hits 
each. 

The annual all-star 
games will be played 
tonight (Thursday) starting 
at 6:30 at Rotary Held. 

The C Division game 
will be played at 6:30, the 
B Division game at 7:45 
and the A Division game 
at 9. 

MVP awards will be 
given out after each game. 



Babe Ruth 



Rowell Sparks 
Bryan Over Granite 



David RoweU led Bryan 
VFW Post to a 13-4 
victory over Granite City 
Electric in Quincy Babe 
Ruth League action. 

Rowell had two hits, 
scored three runs, did 
some outstanding base 
running and played 
excellent defense at third 



base. 

Mike Eddy was the 
winning pitcher. Jon Ryan 
had three hits, Jerermy 
Nielson two long doubles 

and Scott Pyer a double 
and single. Billy Graney 
and Rob Callow had two 
hits each and Stephen 
Wiltshire, Matt Norton and 



Rob Churchill one apiece. 

Ken O'Connell, Kevin 
Cellucci, Pat Cummings 
and Mark Kelly also 
contributed to the win. 

John Breska played an 
outstanding game at third 
base for Granite City and 
Jacob Drohan, Ryan Bell 
and Michael Travers also 
played well. 



Thursday, July 15, 1993 Qolncy Sun Page 15 



Babe Ruth International 



It's Wife Vs. Husband 
In Playoff Finals 



Osco Drug, coached by 
Marie Gallagher, met 
Everlasting Engraving, 
coached by her husband, 
Mike, in the finals of the 
International Babe Ruth 
League playoffs, which 
began Tuesday night 

Everlasting, with one 
loss, must beat Osco twice 
to win the championship. 

Everlasting walloped 
Steve Mansfield, 13-3, 
with Mike Lynch pitching 
a complete game three- 
hitter, striking out 10. 
Losing pitcher was Johnny 
Lee. 

Chris Burden and Matt 
Langille had two singles 
each and John Leonard a 
double. Steve Shaw and 
Jacob Fleming played 
strong defense. 

For Mansfield Brad 
Macauley had a double 
and Jim Mastroianni 
played will defensively. 

Everlasting also 
bombed Mansfield, 23-9, 
with Lynch again pitching 
all the way and striking 
out eight. Lee again was 
the loser. 

Lynch had two singles 
and two doubles, John 
Laukkenan a triple and 
two singles and Shaw a 
double. Langille and Pat 



McDonough had fine 
defensive games. 

For Mansfield Brian 
Snow had a home run, 
double and single, and 
Mastroianni a double. John 
Leuchte played strong 
defense. 

Osco scored three runs 
in the bottom of the 
seventh to edge 
Everlasting, 13-12. 

Kevin Sullivan was the 
winning pitcher and 
Laukkenan the loser. 

For Osco Katie 
Gallagher had four singles 
and a triple, Mike Martin 
a triple and a single, Kerry 
Ginty a double and single, 
Eric Sullivan two singles 
and Joe Vando a triple and 
double. Kevin Sullivan 
won his own game, driving 
in the winning run. Matt 
Louis and Brian O'Connor 
played fine defense. 

For Everlasting Lynch 
had a triple and two 
singles and Laukkenan and 
O'Connell two singles 
each. Shaw, McDonough 
and Mike Trayer stood out 
defensively. 

Osco scored 12 runs in 
the fifth inning and rolled 
over Speedy Muffler, 20-6, 
with Brian O'Connor the 
winner and Chuck Feeley 
the loser. 



For Osco Kevin 
Sullivan had a homer, 
double and single, Ginty 
three singles, martin and 
Vando two singles each 
and Eric Sullivan and 
Jason Lumaghini triples. 
Daniel Conway, 

Gallagher, John Harter, 
John Keeley and Dennis 
Palardy played strong 
defense. 

For Speedy Shawn 
Walsh and Aaron Bassett 
had two hits each and Tim 
Shugrue a double. Jerry 
Noll and Chuck Feeley 
had fine defensive games. 

Mansfield edged 
Speedy, 10-9, scoring six 
runs in the sixth inning. 
Vinnie Sassone was the 
winning pitcher and Shawn 
Walsh the loser. 

For Mansfield Lee had 
a home run and single, Joe 
Barkhouse a double and 
single, Macauley a home 
run and Mastroianni a 
homer. Barkhouse, 
Leuchte and Steve Maffeo 
played fine defense. 

For Speedy Bassett had 
a double and two singles, 
and Keeley, Desmond Liu, 
Kevin Sullivan and Jerry 
Knowles two hits each. 
Liu, Feeley and Matt 
Allen had fine defensive 
games. 



Baseball Camps July 19-23 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department will hold its 
Baseball Camps, July 19- 
23. 

Registration will be 
taken on a first come, first 
serve basis at the Quincy 
Recreation Department, 
100 Southern Artery, 
Monday through Friday, 9 
a.m. - 4 p.m., as long as 



openings exist. 

Each camp will be open 
to participants who are 
interested in perfecting 
their skills in the game of 
baseball. Individual 

attention will be 
emphasized in all phases 
of the game. Instruction, 
position play and game 
experience will be offered. 
Instruction will range from 
the basic fundamentals to 



advanced skills. 

Babe Ruth Eligible 
players (13-15 years) will 
play at Adams Field for 
8:30 - 11:30 a.m. and wiU 
cost $26. Little League 
Eligible players (10 _ 12 
years) will play at McCoy 
and Mitchell Fields from 
12:30 - 3 p.m. and will cost 
$26. 

For additional 

information call 376-1386 
(376-1-FUN). 



Quincy Coming On After Slow Start 



(Cont'd from Page 14) 

Oliver, Dan Donahue, 
Brendan Ridge and Chris 
McCuUey played well. 

Quincy also faced the 
Bayside, N.Y., Yankees in 
a game that was shortened 
by fog. 

Quincy starters were 

Donahue, Pat Dnnnvan 



Steve Koch, Doug 
Gallagher, Ridge, Jim 
Lenchi, McCulley and 
Andy Kenney. Mike Koski 
started pitching and Steve 
Roberts and Sean 
McDonald were in the 
bullpen. 

"The boys have been 
playing very well and I 



think we can cause the top 
teams in Zone 6 
considerable trouble," said 

Quincy coach Ed Spring. 
"With a little bit of luck 
we could have won several 
of those close games." 

By TOM SULLIVAN 



Brady Ponkapoag Winner 

The Women's Division Joan Morton fifth; and ^ertuccio and 
of the Ponkapoag Golf Mary Lou Burke, Mary 
Course recently held a '' 



Florence 
Koffinan, tied for sixth. 



nine-hole tournament— odd 
holes only. 

Betty Brady was the 
winner, Ann Belle second, 
Stephanie Rizza and 
Dottie Pitts, tied for third: 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



SERVICE 



MOaiLE 



«U10 HOME-BUSINESS 

• OEAOIOLTS INS. AILED 
I* LOCKS REKETEO 

• DOOR CLOSERS 

, • PANIC HAROWAME 
I* AUTO KnS FIHED 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRY. QUINCY 

472-2177 



Always Buying 
New&QW 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Comfdete Lffle of Supplies 



Over 300 Sailors In 
Lipton Cup Regatta 



The seventh annual 
Lipton Cup Regatta will 
be held Saturday and 
Sunday off Squantum 
Yacht Qub with a recoid 
number of 300 sailors from 
Canada to Bermuda taking 
part. 

"The Lipton Cup has 
become the biggest regatta 
in the East," said Don 
McGilvray, who heads the 
event's organization along 
with Dick Casey and Dave 
Lewis. "There have been 
big ones at Newport and in 
Florida, but we have been 
contacted by clubs along 



the East Coast, such as 
those on Long Island. They 
all say they want to be 
sure they are included." 

Even the San Diego 
Yacht Qub, current holder 
of the America's Cup, 
made inquiries about the 
Lipton Cup. 

It kicks off with social 
events this Friday night at 
the Squantum Yacht Club. 
There will be 18 different 
boat classes, ranging from 
the small and quick Lasers 
to the large ocean-racing 
PHRF boats. A few years 



ago the Russian entry in 
the America's Cup paid a 
visit to the Lipton Cup. 

"The winners of every 
class will have his or henr 
name on the Lipton Cup," 
said McGilvray. "The cup 
is over 60 years old and 
has an interesting 
tradition." 

The first race will begin 
at 11 a.m. both days and 
four courses will be used. 
For spectators the offshore 
starting line is 500 yards 
off Squantum Yacht Qub's 
outer channel marker. 



Noble Shines In 
Debut With Oilers 



Chris Noble, who had 
an outstanding career at 
Quincy High, made a 
successful debut as 
quarterback for the 
Randolph Oilers, who 
rallied for two touchdowns 
in the last period to defeat 
the Boston Braves 
(formerly the Hyde Park 
Cowboys), 18-15, in an 
Eastern Football League 
opener last Friday at 
Randolph. 

Noble had a hand in 
both Oiler touchdowns. He 
passed to Mark Harding for 
a 17-yanl toudidown to put 
Randolph up, 9-7, 
following a field goal by 
Ray Almeida. 

Then he scored himself 



from the two and 
Almeida's kick made it 
16-7. The other points for 
the Oilers came on a 
safety. 

Noble's only problem 
came later when he was 
caught in traffic, couldn't 
find a man open and rolled 
right. He was twisted up, 
the ball popped out and 
into the hands of Boston's 
Todd Stuckey, who raced 
86 yards for a touchdown. 

"Chris did a fine job 
and I think he will have a 
good season for us," said 
owner and general 
manager Peter O'Kane. 

Noble succeeds another 
former Quincy standout, 
Billy Shaughnessy, who 



retired after a tremendous 
year for the Oilers last 
season. 

Noble is one of several 
Quincy players on the 
Oilers squad. Among 
others are Frank Calabro, 
Kevin MacDougall, Ryan 
Craig, Dave Joyce and Joe 
Baker. 

The Oilers will host 
defending champion 
Marlboro Shamrocks this 
Friday night at 7:30 at 
Randolph High Field. 



Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



GRAND OPENING CONTINUES 



ONE 



GAS 



STOP 



Our Full - Serve Gas Station has five blends of 
gasoline available for your automotive needs. 

We are going back to the basics, remember the good 
old days of service at the pumps. 

Well, they're back at the one-stop-gas station. We will 
wash your windows, check your oil and check your tire 
pressure. 

Our attendants will greet and service you with a smile 
at the One-Stop-Gas Station. 



Professional, knowlegeable certified technicians 

We do the job right the first time! 



Petars 
Automotive 



(61 7) 786-9080 (61 7) 472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 




mmmmwm^wimmmmmmm 



Fully Authorized Car Care Center 

WE DO IT ALL! 



P«g« 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 15, 1993 



Junior League 



Continental Wins 
Second A.L. Title 



Continental Cable won 
its second straight Quincy 
Junior Baseball League 
American League title by 
sweeping its last three 
regular season games and 
winding up at 17-5. 

However, Cable 
dropped a S-4 decision to 
Beacon Sports in the 
opening game of the 
playoffs with Brian Doyle 
hitting two home runs for 
Beacon. 

Doyle's heroics negated 
an otherwise strong 
pitching effort by Chris 
Bregoli, who struck out 15 
in the oppressive heat. 

Cable took an early 2-0 
lead as Mike Welch and 
Paul Carney walked with 
the bases loaded. 

Beacon took a 3-2 lead 
on Doyle's first home run. 
Cable tied it after Carney 
drive in Mike Powers, who 
had walked. Doyle's 
second homer regained the 
lead for Beacon but 
Cable's Ryan Hutchings 
singled in Welch. Three 
singles and a walk in the 
sixth gave Beacon the 
lead for good with Brent 
Austin singling in Brendan 
Donahue. 

Tim McGillicuddy 
threw out two runners at 
the plate, including the 
prospective tying run in 
the sixth. 

Cable bounced back to 
eliminate the Lions, 14-10, 
in its second playoff game 
behind the gutsy pitching 
of Kevin Walsh and the 
hitting of Welch, Powers 
and Bregoli, Walsh 



pitched a six-hitter in 
going the route. 

Cable took a 3-1 lead 
after Welch's double drove 
in two in the first. Cable 
struck for six runs in the 
second with a Powers 
double driving in two, a 
Welch squeeze bunt 
scoring one and Hutchings 
driving in another with a 
double. 

Walsh was in command 
until the Lions struck for 
six runs in the fourth to tie 
the game at nine. Andrew 
Currie and Mike McEvoy 
haxed the key hits with 
McEvoy droving in two 
with a double. 

matt Moriarty got the 
winning Cable rally started 
with a single. Tim 
O'Connor followed with a 
double and BregoU blasted 
a three-run homer to deep 
right center for the winning 
run. Welch followed a 
Powers double and a 
Walsh walk with a single 
to drive in two more. 

Welch had five RBI, 
Bregoli three And Powers 
two. Powers had three 
doubles, Billy Davis and 
Hutchings had excellent 
fielding plays. 

McEvoy led the Lions 
with two doubles and three 
RBI and Pat Dolbeare and 
Mike Riedy played well. 

In the first of its last 
three regular season games 
Cable cruised by Burgin 
Platner, 15-5, as Bregoli 
pitched a two-hitter and 
had 12 strikeouts. 

Cable exploded for 
seven runs in the first 



inning with Powers tripling 
in tvfo runs and Hutchings 
and Chad Fitzpatrick 
droving in runs. 

Hutchings had two more 
RBI in a five-run second, 
Walsh, who went 2-for-2, 
drove in three and scored 
three times and O'Connor 
scored three runs. 

For Burgin Will Tracy 
had a triple and Brendan 
Bowes doubled in a run. 

Cable then walloped 
South Shore Buick, 16-6, 
with Walsh pitching a 
complete game, striking 
out 10. 

Bregoli drove in five 
runs with a two-run 
homer, a triple and double. 
Walsh went 4-for-4 and 
had two RBI, Fitzpatrick 
had an RBI double as did 
Joe Ardagna, Billy Davis 
had two hits and an RBI 
and Paul Flynn also drove 
in a run. 

For Buick, Matt Kisel 
and a triple and single and 
J.T. Stevenson and Paul 
Lentine had two hits each. 

Cable finished the 
regular season with a 5-0 
victory over the VFW as 
Bregoli pitched one-bit 
ball over four innings and 
struck out 10. It raised bis 
strikeout total to 121 in 55 
innings. 

Chris Wilson drove in 
Fitzpatrick for the first run 
and in the third, following 
three walks. Powers 
doubled three runs in. 
O'Connor drove in the 
other run after Walsh had 
tripled. 



80 In Quincy Legion Golf Tourney 



The second annual 
Quincy Legion golf 
tourdment was held 



recenUy at the Rockland 
Golf Club with 80 players 
taking part. 




YOU 
AUTO 
NOW 




by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkly and Kevin McGroarty 

KEEP PLUGGING AWAY 

An auto technician can tor problem or a vacuum 



tell a lot about a car simply 
by replacing the spark plugs. 
The electrodes on the re- 
placed plugs shouM be a 
golden brown or grayish- 
tan. If a plug is blackened 
with carbon buikJup, it is a 
sign that the cylinder is be- 
ing fed an overly rich fuel/air 
mixture. If this problem is 
limited to a single cylinder, 
the fault could lie witfi a fuel 
injector. If all the plugs are 
laden with cart)on, it may be 
that a clogged air filter is 
restricting air flow. Blister- 
ing of a spark plug's white 
ceramic top is a sign that 
the cylinder has been rurv 
ning too hot or overly lean. 
Cylinder overheating may 
be due to detonation caused 
by carbon buildup in the 
combustion chamber or a 
restriction in coolant pas- 
sage. A lean fuel mixture 
may be a sign of a fuel injec- 



leak. 

HINT: If even one spark 
plug is fouled, it may lead to 
a failed state emissions 
control test due to high hy- 
drocarbon levels. 

LEO & WALT'S 
SUNOCO would like to re- 
mind you that our techni- 
cians here at 258 Quincy 
Ave., E. Braintree (843- 
1550) look forward to the 
challenge of giving your car 
the same level of personal 
attention tiiey give their own. 
Whether you need to have 
your spark plugs replaced, 
or more extensive work 
done, make us your first 
stop. Ask about our ALL- 
DATA computer system, 
that provides us witii the 
latest information from the 
manufacturer. "A Place 
Where Your Car Can Live 
Longer." Sunoco and most 

major credit cards honored. 



A dinner was held at 
the post following the 
touranment and prizes 
were awarded. 

The winning foursome 
included Tom, Jim, Scott 
and Paul Curran of 
Jamaica Plain. 

Sponsors were Sen. 
Mike Morrissey, Beacon 
Sports, G.T. Wilkinson 
Co., St. Joseph's Church, 
Spotlight Tavern, Ron 
Gaudet, City Councillor 
Tim Cahill, Westwood 
VFW, Frank Brillo, Local 
254 and Post 95 Ladies 
Auxiliary. 

Quincy Legion 
Pawtucket Sox 

Trip July 17 

The Quincy Legion 
baseball team will bold its 
second annual Night at 
Pawtucket this Saturday, 
July 17. 

Tickets for the 
Pawtucket Red Sox game 
are available at $5 each 
and include round trip by 
motor coach from Quincy 
Vo-Tech at 5:30 p.m. and 
box seat. 

Money from ticket sales 
will be used to help 
support Quincy Legion 
baseball. 



Dave Peters UMass 
Asst. Hockey Coach 



Dave Peters, a Quincy 
native and former North 
Quincy High hockey 
coach, has been named an 
assistant hockey coach at 
the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst 
after serving the past three 
years as an assistant coach 
at Kent State University. 

Peters was assistant 
coach at Kent State two 
years ago when his team 
upset Boston College, 4-3, 
at Conte Fonim. 

UMass-Amherst head 
coach Joe Mallen, a B.C. 
assistant for the past seven 
years, was impressed by 
the play of Kent State in 
that game. 

"They came in and beat 
us on our own ice and I 
remember saying whoever 
is doing their recruiting is 
doing a great job," said 
Mallen. "It was Dave 
Peters." 



Peters' primary duties 
with the Minutemen's new 
hockey program will be 
recruiting. 

"Dave has a lot of 
talents," added Mallen. 
"His main forte is 
recruiting and that's the 
focus of our whole program 
right now. The biggest 
thing we needed was to 
have a couple of guys with 
recrtiiting talents." 

Peters attended St. 
Mary's School in Quincy 
and attended Abp. 
Williams High and Boston 
College, where he played 
hockey. He came up 
through the Quincy Youth 
Hockey program, played in 
the New England Pro- 
Amateur League, the Pro 
Elite League and the 
Quincy Executive League. 
He was assistant coach at 
Weymouth North before 
taking over the North 



Quincy reins for the 1989- 
90 season. 

His only Raider team 
won its first five games 
against Greater Boston 
League teams but faltered 
when the Suburban League 
got underway and finished 
at 8-9-2. 

He was looking forward 
to his second year at North 
as he had a fine returning 
nucleus, but felt he 
couldn't pass up the 
chance to coach at Kent 
State. 

"I enjoyed coaching at 
North and was really 
looking forward to a 
second year," he said. 
"But I couldn't pass up the 
chance to coach at the 
Div. 1 college level. It is a 
real thrill to be coming 
home to coach and I'm 
eagerly looking forward to 
coaching at UMass." 



Impressive Scores Despite 
Heat At Ladies' Tourney 



Despite the oppressive 
heat, 104 members and 
guests survived the day 
with some impressive 
scores in the Presidents 
Golf Course Ladies 
Association's aimual "Hats 
Off" member-guest 
tournament. 

Marci Arnold bad low 
gross with her aunt, 
Marion Keguin; third net 
with another aunt. Norma 
Berglund, and eighth net 
with another guest, Gerri 
GrifBa 

Members and guests 
were creative in this year's 
"hat" motif with first place 
going to Carol Cahill and 
her guest, Terry Dobson, 
and second place to Moya 



Baldwin and her guest, 
Carol Lynch. 

The gross scores: 
Marcie Arnold and Marion 
Keguin, 72; Kerri 
McGlynn and Verna 
Muheady, 72; Patty Buck 
and Nancy Murphy, 73, 
and Margaret Murphy and 
Liz McDonough, 73. 

Net scores were Chris 
Cronin and Pam Burgeson, 
59; Carol Maglio and 
Donna Keating, 59; 
Marcie Arnold and Norma 
Berglund, 60; Suzanne 
Coleman and Chris 
Finnell, 60. 

Also, Sue Martinelli 
and Bea Parkett, 61; 
Lorraine Feeney and Mae 
Pollard, 61: Janice Morin 



and Cathy Coakley, 61; 
Marcie Arnold and Gerri 
Griffin, 62; Roberta 
McCann and Carol 
Rappoli, 62; Veronica 
Bertrand and Marijek 
Alsbach, 63; Carol Cahill 
and Terry Dobson, 63, and 
Moya Baldwin and Carol 
Lynch, 63. 

Those closest to the 
pins were Carol Lynch on 
the second hole, Lisa 
Kennedy, fourth; Carol 
Davenport, seventh; Sue 
Martinelli, 10th; Ann 
Dawson, 13th; and Carol 
Rappoli, 18th. 

Marcie Arnold had the 
longest drive on the 12th 
hole in Div. 1 and Carol 
Cahill in Div. II. 



Clark Wins Record 9 
Gold Medals In Senior Games 



EUery Clark, Jr., of 
Cohasset, an annual 
multiple gold medal 
winner in the Quincy 
Senior Olympics, recently 
broke the meet record by 
winning nine gold medals 
in the annual 

Massachusetts Senior 
Games at Springfield 
College. 

Claik won the 100, 200, 
and 400 meter dashes in 
the 80-84 age division, as 
well as the 5 -kilometer 
(3.1 miles) and 1500 
meters race walks and 



running long jump, shot 
put, discus and javelin. 

It raised his career 
record in track and field to 
99 wins, 23 second places 
and 23 third places. 

"I am hoping to carry 
the torch in the celebration 
in Atlanta of the 
centennial of the first 
modem Olympic Games," 
Clark said. "My late 
father won both the 
running high jump and 
running long jump in the 
revival at Athens, Greece. 



"With good fortune, at 
Brown University next 
January, I hop to win my 
100th career victory for the 
Boston Athletic 

Association, which would 
be a cherished honor." 

The 1896 BAA track 
team was the first USA 
Olympic team to win half 
the events. This honor was 
shared with Robert Ganett 
and a small contingent 
from the Princetown 
University team and James 
B. Connolly of South 
Boston. 



Flavin Wins 14th 
Straight In Triple A 



The Flavin Yankees 
extended their win streak 
to 14 games as they won 
their first two Triple A 
Baseball League playoff 
games, edging the Orioles, 
9-8, and the Astros, 4-2. 

Jamie Crossi and Bard 
Hajrizaj pitched complete 
games and Adam 
Jurewich, John Mooney, 



Robert Rice, Kfisten „ , . 
Bowes and Peter Comiolly ^ P'^^^^ ^'"• 




Unibed VW^y 

of Massachusetts Bay 

Something to feel gooJ abon* 



Thursday, July 15, 1993 Qnlncy Son Page 17 



Edward 
Student 

Edward P. Lyons, Jr. of 
Quincy has been named 
the "most outstanding 
student" in her academic 
program at Mount Ida 
College in Newton Center. 

Lyons is an associate's 
degree graduate of the 
occupational therapy 
assistant program. 

In his first year, Lyons 
courses provided 
background to become an 
occupational therapy 
assistant. The second year 
was split between 



Lyons Jr., Outstanding 
At Mount Ida College 




EDWARD LYONS Jr. 

fieldwork and class work. 
Fieldwork provides 



students with the real 
hands-on training that is 
necessary in becoming 
familiar with the OT 
profession. 

Lyons' future plans 
include continuing his 
education towards an M.S. 
degree in hand therapy. 
He has been offered a 
position in Florida, and 
hopes to continue his 
education and training 
either there or in the 
Boston area. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building at 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 




(FMASSACHUSETTS BAi^ 



leOAt NOTICE 



UGAL NOTICE 



UQAL NOTICE 



CITY OF QUINCY 

FINAL STATEMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES AND 

PROJECTED USES OF CDBG FUNDS 

I. INTRODUCTION 

The City of Quincy will receive $2,267,000.00 in Community Development Block 
Grant(CDBG) Entitlement funds from theU.S. Departmentof Housing and Urban Development 
(HUD) for the 1993-94 program year. This Statement describesthe community development 
objectives of the City of Quincy and projected use of its 1993-94 CDBG funds. Public 
comments regarding this Statement are welcome and should be addressed to the Depart- 
ment of Planning and Community Development, Quincy City Hall, Quincy, MA 02169. 

II. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES 

The City of Quincy aims to use its CDBG funds to cany out the national objectives 
of benefitting low and moderate income families or aiding in the prevention or elimination of 
slums or blight. To achieve these objectives, Quincy's 1993-94 CDBG program is directed 
towards achieving the following specific community development ot)jectives: 

1. Housing: 

• Rehabilitate owner-occupied housing units of low and 
moderate income households and rental housing units 
occupied primarily by low and moderate income households; 

• Elimination of sanitary and building code violations and 
hazards such as lead paint in housing units occupied 
primarily by low and moderate income househokJs; and 

• Create affordable rental housing opportunities for low and 
moderate income residents. 

2. Public Service: 

• Provide a variety of heaHh, educational, social, and cultural 
programs and activities primarily for elderly people and 
members of low and moderate income households. 

3. Removal of ArchKectural Ban'iers 

Removal of materials and aroNtectural ban'iers in residential 
properties and public facilities which restrict the mobility and 
accessibility of elderly or handicapped persons. 

4. Public Facilities and Improvements: 

Reconstruction, rehabilitation or installation of public 
facilities and improvements carried out by the City or by other 
public or private nonprofit entities that benefit primarily low 
and moderate income people; 

• Reconstruct roadways, sidewalks, walkways and paria, 
upgrade traffic signalization and improve traffic 
channelization to promote commercial area growth and 
revitalization; 

• Upgrade existing neighborhood public facilities and 
infrastructure. 

5. Economic Development: 

Foster economic stability, revitalization, and growtii in the 
City's commercial areas; and 

• Leverage private investment arKi create additional 
employment opportunities for low and moderate income 
people. 

Thedty of Quincy plans to commit at least 70% of tiie 1993-94 CDBG funds towards 
activities that will benefit low and moderate income people. Remaining funds will akJ in tine 
prevention or elimination of slums and blight. 
UL PROPOSED 1993^ CDBG ACTIVHIES 

Housing Rehabilitation - City-wide single and multi-family rehabilitation grant and 
loan and lead paint abatement programs to increase the supply of decent, safe and sanitary 
housing for low-mod income Quincy residents; maximum grant is $10,000 per single family 
and $1 5,000 per multi-family units; loans payable in 1 5 years or less; implemented ttirough 
tfie Office of Housing Rehabilitation (OHR); also Includes administrative support for the 
Quincy Neighborhood Housing Services to assist in the provision of low cost loans or grants 
to eligible homeowners in the Quincy Point, Wollaston, North Quincy, Houghs Neck and 
Southwest areas of Quincy. 

Removal or Architectural Ban^iers - handicap accessibility projects involving resi- 
dential as well as non-residential properties throughout the City, implemented through the 
OHR. 

Public Facilities and Improvements- reconstruction or rehabilitatkMi of non-residen- 
tial structures City-wkle that provkle public services primarily to benefrt low-mode income 
persons. Implemented through tiie OHR; also for the reconstructten of sti-eets and skJewalks, 
paria and recreation improvements, traffic and puWte safety improvements to be carried out 
in Quincy Center, a state-designated Commercial Area Revitalization Distiict (CARD) and 
various low and moderate income neighbortioods or other areas to eliminate slums/blight 
conditions; to be implemented tfirough the Departments of Planning and Publk: Wori«. 

Special Economkj Devetopment Activities - business assistance programs consist- 
ing of sign, facade/storefront, and commercial grant/toan programs for norvtew-mod busi- 
ness distrtets and economfc devetopment toans and grants programs for new and existkig 



Joan Baker Top Conway Lister 

Joan Baker has been Baker, a realtor since Quincy based 

named Top Lister for the 1963, has consistently organization, Domestic 

Jack Conway & been among the Violence Ended (DOVE). 

Company's Wollaston company's top producere. She lives in Quincy and 

o ffice- She is also president of the ' ^^ *^e children. _ 



t£QAL Notice 



LHJAL NOTICE 



In accordance witii he City of Quincy Municipal Code, Titie 1 0, VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC, 
Chapter 10>04, General Provisions, Section 10.04.050 

CHIEF OF POLICE - AUTHORITY TO TEMPORARILY PROHIBIT PARKING 

Paridng is prohibited to accommodate ttie Quincy Center Bazaar as folbws: 



STREET 
Hancock St. 



SU2E FROM 
Both Granite St. 



School St. 



TYPE REGULATION 
No Parking 
Tow Zone 
From 10.tX)p.m. 
on July 14, 1993 
tiirough 10:00 p.m. 
onJuly17, 1993. 



PER ORDER: 
FRANCIS E. MULLEN 
CHIEF OF POLICE 

7/15/93 



USaAL NOTICE 



UBOALNOnce 



USMLNOnCE 



businesses that are located in low-mod target areas or tfiat generate jobs which are primarily 
for low-mod income people; includes an incubation program component to assist new 
enterprises; to be undertaken by Quincy 2000 Corporation, a non-profit subgrantee. 

Public Services - human/social services programs, particulariy to address tfie 
needs of the elderly and low-mod income househokJs undertaken by various subgrantees: 

Council on Aging - $125,000 allocated to Implement an ekferiy transportation 
program focusing primarily to benefit those on medical appointments and, subject to 
availability of vans, also to bring ekieriy people to nutritton sites; 

Germantown Neighboriiood Council - $76,000 altocated to Implement social 
programs to benef K the ekieriy and primarily low-mod family and chikJren in tiie Germantown, 
Houghs Neck and Adams Shore neighborhoods; program includes atiiletic activities to be 
managed by tiie Police Atiiletic League; 

Atiantic Neighboriiood - $40,000 allocated to implement social programs to benefit 
tiie ekieriy and primarily low-mod family and children in the Atiantic, Squantum, and 
Montclair-Wollaston neighboriioods; 

Ward II - $32,000 allocated to implement social programs to benefit the ekieriy and 
primarily low-mod family and children in tiie Quincy Point Area; 

Beechwood Community Life Center - $26,000 allocated to implement elderiy 
programs in this Center. 

Ward IV - $5,000 allocated to implement After School Day Care Program for chiWren 
from primarily low-mod income families in Ward IV. 

Quincy Interfaith Sheltering Coalition - $22,000 allocated to implement a Day 
Program for alcoholic and drug dependent homeless people; 

Asian Liaison - $34,000 allocated to provkle assistance to low/mod Asian minorities. 

Planning activities - planning initiatives to be undertaken through tfie Quincy 
Planning Department; includes $50,000 allocated to Quincy 2000 for tfie conduct of data 
collection and analysis, and planning in connection with downtown and business develop- 
ment; 

Program Administration - Overall CDBG program administration expenses includ- 
ing staff salaries and benefits, audit, and office expenses; also includes contract with tiie 
Quincy Community Action Program to support its fair housing counselling program. 

IV. PROJECTED USE OF CDBG ENTITLEMENT FUNDS FOR THE 1993-1994 PRO- 
GRAM YEAR. 

Housing RehabilKation 

Housing Rehabilitation Program Support 

Quincy Neighborhood Housing Sen^ices 

Removal of Architectural Ban'iers 

Reconstmction/Rehabilitation Of Non-profit 

Publk: Facilities and Improvements 

Reconstruction/Renovation of Neighborhood 

Publk: Facilities and Improvements 

Quincy Center Commercial Revitalization 

Special Economk: Devetopment Activities 

PuWte Servtees: ». , .^ 

Community Associattons: Ward I (Germantown, Houghs Neck, Adams 
Shore): Beechwood; Atiantic-Montdair/Wollaston-Squantum; Ward II 
and Ward IV; Elderly Outreach Van Program; Quincy Interfaitfi 
Sheltering Coalition etc.) 

Planning and Administration 453,400 

TOTAL $ 2,267,000 

In addition to tiiese funds, tfie CHy of Quincy will utilize approximately $1 30,000 o« 
ttiis year's expected program income as part of Its revolving restoential rehabilitation toan 
program and up to 15% of FY1 992-93 program income for additional public servtoes, 
specifically to fund tfie Asian Liaison position. 

V. CDBG ENTITLEMENT FUNDS EXPENDED DURING 1991-92 PROGRAM YEAR 

The following expenditures were incun-ed for tiie program year which ended on June 
30, 1992, as indicated in tiie Grantee Performance Report: 



$ 



328,000 

272,000 

45,000 

75,000 

25,000 

78,550 
400,000 
250,000 
340,050 



Housing Rehabilitation 

Removal of Architectural Barriers 

Affordable Housing Development 

Public Facilities and Improvements 

Rehabilitation of Non-profit Structures 

Public Services: 

Planning and Administration 

Total 
Adjustment to Prior year's expenditures 
TOTAL 



1,213,983 
43,016 
134,912 
191,233 
15,932 
326.378 
338,138 

2,263,592 
-13,750 

2,249,842 



VI 



DISPLACEMENT 

The City of Quincy undertakes all CDBG programs and activities In a manner wtifch 
either eliminates or minimizes dsplaoements of persons. A copy of ttie City's Dispiaoement 
Policy is available tiirough the Quincy Department of Planning and Community DevetopmwiL 



7/1S/93 



P«ge 18 Quincy Son Thnnday, July 15, 1993 



46 Quincy College Nursing Students Recognized At Ceremony 



Forty-six Quincy 
College nursing students 
recently participated in a 
recognition ceremony at 
First Parish Church, 
Quincy Square. 

The ceremony 

highlighted two significant 
moments in the life of the 
nursing students. First, the 
certificate of Program 
Completion was presented 



and then the students were 
recognized as peers by 
nursing professionals. 

The students, who 
represent more than 12 
communities, are: 

Patrice Ballem, Sarah 
Beal, Jean Belmont, 
Jennifer Butler, Jo-Anne 
Calabro (class secretary). 
Amy Canty, Myrna 
Cassion, Dianne 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 



ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 

City of Quincy, Massachusetts (Owner) 
Sealed bids for construction of the tvlorthwest Quincy 
Drainage Improvement Project Phase I for the city of 
Quincy, Massachusetts, will be received at the Offices 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, 
Quincy, Massachusetts until 10:00 a.m. prevailing time, 
on Thursday, July 29, 1993 at which time and place said 
bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. 
The scope of work includes construction of 
approximately 200 l.f. of 12-inch RC storm drain, 270 l.f. 
of 15-inch RC storm drain, 1 ,120 l.f. of 24-inch RC storm 
drain, 1 ,300 l.f. of 24-inch PVC storm drain, 660 l.f. of 30- 
inch PVC storm drain, 360 l.f. of 36-inch PVC storm 
drain, 216 l.f. of 3-foot x 4-foot RC box culvert, and 
appurtenances. 

Bkl security in the form of a bid bond, cash, certified 
check, treasurer's or cashier's check, payable to the 
Owner, is required in a dollar amount of five percent of 
the bid amount. 

The Instructions to Bidders, Form of General Bid, 
Agreement, Plans, Specifications, Performance and 
Payment Bond, and other Contract Documents may be 
examined at the following: 

Weston & Sampson Engineers. Inc.. Peabodv. 
Massachusetts. Department of Public Works. Quincv. 
Massachusetts 

Copies may be obtained at the Offices of the 
Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, 
MA 02169 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on payment of a 
non-refundable fee of $60 for each set. 
Contract Documents and plans will be mailed to 
prospective bidders upon request and receipt of a 
separate check for $15 to cover handling and mailing 
fees. This amount is not refundable. 
Both checks shall be made payable to The City of 
Quincy. 

A Prebid Conference will be hekl on July 19, 1993 at 
10:30 a.m. at the Department of Public Works, 55 Sea 
Street. Any request for interpretation of plans and 
specifications may be submitted in writing at that time. 
Bidders will have an opportunity to view the site of the 
work following the Prebid Conference. 
All prospective bidders must obtain pre-bid qualifications 
from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Highway 
Department, Contract Regulations Division, 10 Park 
Plaza, Room 7552, Boston, Massachusetts 02116. A 
copy of the bidder's pre-bid qualification certificate must 
be submitted to Owner prior to obtaining contract 
documents and plans. 

All bids for this project are subject to applicable bidding 
laws of Massachusetts, including General Laws Chapter 
30, Section 39M as amended. 

Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) and Women's 
Business Enterprise (WBE) policies of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the city of Quincy 
are applicable to this Contract. The goals for this project 
are: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this project a 
not less than ten (10) percent ratio of minority 
employee manhours to total manhours in each 
job category. 

2. A minimum of ten (1 0) percent MBE participation 
and five (5) percent WBE participation by state- 
certified MBEs and WBEs. The Bidder shall 
submit completed MBEyWBE forms wit h the bid. 

Failure to comply with the requirements of this paragraph 
may be deemed to render a proposal nonresponsive. 
The Bidders attention is called to the requirements and 
conditkans of employment to be obsen/ed and minimum 
wage rates to be paid under the contract as determined 
by the Department of Labor and Industries under the 
provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 
149, Section 26-27D, inclusive, as amended. 
The selected contractor shall furnish a performance 
bond and a payment bond in amount at least equal to one 
hundred percent (100%) of the contract price as 
stipulated in Section 00700 GENERAL CONDITIONS of 
these specifications. 

The BkWer agrees that this bW shall be good and may not 
be withdrawn for a period of 60 days, Saturdays, 
Sundays and legal holklays excluded, after the opening 

of bids. 

Compliance with the city of Quincy's Ordinance requiring 

contractors working on city-supported construction 

projects to hire a certain percentage of Quincy residents 

in mandatory. 

The Owner reserves the right to waive any informalities 

or to reject any or all bWs. 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 

BY ITS COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WORKS 

DAVIDA.COLTON 

7/15/93 



Columbus, Andrea 
Cotterell, Michelle Doody, 
Michael Forbes, Audile 
Germain, Linda Guerrero, 
Claire Halpin, Laurie 
Hartigan (class treasurer), 
Jeanell Hartzog, Jeanne 
Hayes, Ellen Hughes, 
Carole Jean, Yonide 
Justinville, Patrick Kane, 
Maureen Kilroy, Sylvia 
Lewis, Diane Long, 



iEGAtNOnCIE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1676E1 

Estate of JOHN E. 

SULLIVAN 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that SHARON 
HOWLETT of ATTLEBORO 
in the County of BRISTOL 
be appointed executrix 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in sakJ 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 18, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this seventh day 
of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
R«^stM- of Probate 

7/15/93 



Bethany Maschio, Noreen 
Massey, Dawn McCamey, 
Sheila Montgomery (class 
president), Nicole Nichols, 
Gladys Obas, Paul 
Olmsted, Katherine 
O'Neal, Erin Palm, 
Charles Parker, Susan 
Pauli, Jennifer Peterson, 
Joanne Rodick, Marilyn 
Rogers, Sandra Shade, 
Pamela Smith, Margaret 
Trevains, Karin Turner, 
Wendy Vaughan, Stacey 
Verrico, Kevin Wallace, 
Diana Wright. 



Laurie Hartigan 
received the Alumni 
Award and Wendy Vaughn 
received the Faculty 
Award later during the 
ceremony. 

Guest speaker was Rep. 
Frank M. Hynes 

(Marshfield and Scituate). 
Hynes chaired the Special 
Commission on Nursing 
which authored House Bill 
6039. This bill fostered the 
modern nurse's role in 
health care delivery and 
provided a response to 



many of the issues such as 
the entry into the practice 
and the shortage of nurses. 
House Bill 6039 is an 
achievement in the history 
of nursing. Nursing finds its 
roots in Boston where the 
Hrst nursing school in 
America was founded in 
1863. 



Rev. Dr. Sheldon 
Bennett, First Parish 
Church, offered comments 
and a prayer. 



144 On Sterling Honor Roll 



Sterling Middle School 
lists 144 students on its 
fourth quarter honor roll. 

They are: 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1668A1 

Estate of ELEANOR T. 

BRANDI 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that GERARD BRANDI of 
LYNNFIELD in the County 
of ESSEX be appointed 
administrator of said 
estate without surety on 
the bond. 

H you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 18, 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the seventh day 
of July, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Roglstor of Probate 
7/15/93 



mVITATION FOR BIDS 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
1305 HANCOCK ST., QUINCY, MA 02169 
Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and 
delivering to the City of Quincy: 
SCHOOL DEFT.: MILK, JULY 28, 1 993 @ 1 0«0 AM 
SCHOOL DEPT.: CLEANING & STORAGE OF ATHLETIC 
EQUIPMENT, JULY 28, 1 993 @ 1 0:1 5 AM 
QUINCY COLLEGE: MICROCOMPUTERS & PRINTERS, 
JULY28, 1993 @ 10:30 AM 

QUINCY COLLEGE: STUDENT TABLET ARM CHAIRS, 
JULY28, 1993 @ 10:45 AM 

QUINCY COLLEGE: COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE 
COMPUTER SYSTEM/HARDWARE & SOFTWARE, 
AUGUST 4, 1993 @ 10:00 AM 

QUINCY COLLEGE: RENTAL OF CLASSROOM SPACE 
IN QUINCY CENTER, AUGUST 4, 1 993 @ 1 030 AM 
SCHOOL: PRINCIPALS OF TECHNOLOGY-YEAR 1 
PROGRAM, AUGUST 4, 1 993 @ 1 1 :00 AM 
SCHOOL: TELEPHONE MAINTENANCE & REPAIR 
SERVICES, AUGUST 4, 1 993 @ 1 1 :30 AM 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the 
Purchasing Agent, Quincy City Hall, 1305 Hancock St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any, the delivery date 
and any allowable discounts. 

Rrm bkJ prices will be given first consideration and will 
be received at the office of the Purchasing Agent until 
the time and date state above, at which time and date 
they will be publicly opened and read. 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope. The outside of the 
sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, 'BID 
ENCLOSED" with time/date of bid call. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to 
accept any part of a bid or the one deemed best for the 
City. 

James A. Sheets, MAYOR 
Robert F. Denvir, Jr. PURCHASING AGENT 
7/15/93 



High Honors 

Lisa Barrett, Elizabeth 
Diaz, Kimberly Dibona, 
Jeffrey Langille, Thomas 
Mavrogeorge, Laura 
McEvoy, Anna 

Nurmenniemi, Luis Ochoa, 
Jeffi-ey Russo, Lisa Snow, 
Jefferey Stevens, 
Stephanie Tat, Catherine 
Wong, Michelle Chami, 
Alicia Collie, Jessie 
Cullen, Jessica Dibona, 
Janean Doherty, Diane 
Hanlon, Melisa Kertesz, 
Henry Wan, Winnie 
Weng, Eva Wong, Sarah 
Jenkins, William Li, 
Bryony Webber, Yun Yu 
Wing, Rachel Picard. 
Honors 

Tony Alves, William 
Barrett, Christina Cicci, 
Patrick Connolly, Patrick 
Crossman, Tracy Crowley, 
Matthew Darois, Princess 
Nathania DeJesus, 
Shannon Deveau, Steven 
DiBenedetto, Sara Dibona, 
John Donovan, Daniel 
Epstein, Andrea Failla, 
David Forde, Michael 
Eraser, Kerri Griffin, Alana 
Hamm, Kristin Jakaitis, 
Crystal Kelley, Lee 
Kenny, Sarah Larson, 
Stephen Little, Christina 
Louis, Sean MacDonald, 
Jamie McCarthy, Sean 
McMCusker, Robert 
Mood, Louis Ng, Matthew 



Ochoa, 
Daniel 
John 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1569GI 
NOTICE OF 
GUARDIANSHIP of 
MENTALLY ILL 
To EDYTHE C. ANDERSON 
of QUINCY in said County 
and all persons interested in 
the estate of EDYTHE C. 
ANDERSEN and to the 
Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health, a petition 
has been presented in the 
above-captioned matter 
praying that ALLANA 
O'BRIEN of 

SCARBOROUGH in the 
State of MAINE be 
appointed guardian of 
mentally ill with surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, 
you or your attorney must 
file a written appearance in 
said Court at Dedham on or 
before ten o'clock in the 
forenoon on August 4, 1993. 
WITNESS, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of 
said Court at Dedham, this 
twenty-third day of June, in 
the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and 
ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Rvgistor of Probate 
7/15/93 



Nicklas, Goretti 
Dennis Palardy, 
Palu zzi , 
Papadopoulos, Rosemarie 
Papkey, Kristen Perry, 
Nicholas Pizziferri, Mark 
Porzuczek, Kimberly 
Richardson, Jillian 
Ritchie, Michael Roberts, 
Matthew Rodenhiser, Vera 
Schepis, Randall Spivey- 
Stetson, Jane Waibel, 
Charles Wilkins, Eric Yu, 
Yi Yu Fung, Odalie 
Bautista, Amber 

Bleakney, Lea Bonome, 
Sara Churchill, Stephen 
Clarke, Heather Crawford, 
Jason Crossman, Anthony 
Dibona, Kristen Dibona, 
Mark Doren, Yolanda 
Ferrara, Sean Fitzgerald, 
Renee Gagliard, Kenneth 
Hale, Patrick Higgins, 
James Maclsaac, Thomas 
Mann, Nicolette 

Martinson, Christopher 
McLean, Nicholas Perry, 
William Riley, Surita 
Rorie, Anthony Staffier, 
Michelle Stuart, Jessica 
Sturgis, Susan Tarn, Jenny 
Tran, George Tsipakis, 
Esther Wang, Stan 
Westland, Natasha 
Wiltshire, Edison Wong, 
Nicole Young, Ajay Apte, 
Carrie Burke, Melissa 
Christopher, Carolina 
Coral, Nicole Crosby, 
LoriAnn Eraser, Charleen 
Gale, Todd Haskell, 
Marika Hewes, Michael 
Johnstone, Jill Joyce, 
Abeni Kendrick, Matthew 
Langille, Yvonne 
Letourneau, Matthew 
Lindblom, Paul Louis, 
Mark MacDonald, Julie 
McLaughlin, Charles 
Mil one, Christine Mullen, 
David Nguyen, James 
Panagos, Stephen 
Pasquale, Quang Pham, 
Stephanie Powers, 
Michael Russo, Jeurik 
Samborski, Angela 
Staffier, Dawn Thomas, 
Kathy Tung, Stephen 
Venuto, Bob Wan, Erin 
Zanoni, Joanne Farley, 
Jillian Rexford. 




Thursday, JnJy 15, 1993 Qnlncy Sun Page 19 



1 







EVERYBODY'S MARKETPUGE 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Nawly Ranovatad 
Sons of Italy Social Canlar 
GoMan Lion Soita 
Capacity -300 
Vanatian Room 
Capactty - 140 
Call 47M 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

For information please call 

767-0519 



TF ■ 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Waddings. Showers. 

Maatings, Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St 

Ouinf y 

472-2223 

TE 



HALL FOR REm- 

Nickaraon Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

HandKapped Accessible. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-0624 

Monday through Saturday i-lpmif 



LAMP 

^\*/- REBMR& 

REWRING 



#a 



wSRRmk 



IM'IIII 

WQiMar KQMcr 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

1 suitable for large functions 
(350-t- people); otfier suited for 
snialler functions (1 20 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

472-6234 wz 



COTTAGES 
FOR RENT 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, house- 
keeping cottages. Stu- 
dio and 3 room avail- 
able. Weekly rentals 
$200-$350. Private 
beach. Tennis avail- 
able. Call 328-1300, 9 
am to 6 pm tf 



APT. FOR RENT 

Waterfront 1 bed- 
room, all new, 
Ig. porch, laundry. 
$650.00/month 
includes 
everything. 
471-3952 
773-3020 7/22 




Thank You 

Blessed Mother 



B.R. 7/22 



Sun 



Classified 
Ads 
Get 



Results 






VIKING 
ROOFING 

Residential 
Specialists 

773-2884 



a/9 



■p^^^n^^^w^ 



WANT6D 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, 
old hand tools, all trades 
(machinist, pattern maker, 
watchmaker, etc.) shop k>ts. 
Also, antiquarian books, 
frames, paintings. Antk^ues In 
estate k>ts. 

1-61 7-558-3839 tf 



SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

Mattress Warehouse 
40% Savings 

Moved to Stou^ton Center- 
next to Town Hall and P.O.- 
Rts. 138/27-344/4888 a/23 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

TVIE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 92D-1964-D1 

Summons By Publication 

Marek Piechowiak, 

Plaintiff 

V. 

Aneta Piechowiak, 
Defendant 

To the above named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Marek 
Piechowiak of Quincy, 
seeking to dissolve the 
bonds of matrimony with 
Aneta Piechowiak, who 
cannot be found within the 
Commonwealth. 

You are required to 
serve upon Charles 
Gennis, plaintiff's 
attorney, whose address 
is One Kendall Sq., Suite 
2200, Cambridge, MA 
021 39, your answer on or 
before September 15, 
1993. If you fail to do so, 
the court will proceed to 
the hearing and adjucation 
of this action. You are 
also required to file a copy 
of your answer in the office 
of the Register of this 
Court at Dedham, 
Massachusetts. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this 8th day of 
June, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 

7/1, 7/8/, 7/15/93 



QRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY - .TF 

PROFESSONAL 



WINDOA^ 
&SCREEN5 




sa 



m-ffti 

V.CmKt HONKT MAMTMI 

LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior - Exterior Painting 
Scroll Celling 
All Home Repairs 

Small or Large 
1-800-479-2476 tf 



AHEtmou 

Local cabinetmaker needs 
worki I will resurface your 
kHchen (with laminate of your 
choice), for lees than half the 
cost of new cabinets. 

QUAUTY CRAFTMANSHiP 
/ alto rmion anUqum lumHum. 

W.F. ALLEN 
CABINETMAKER 

Over 30 yrs. experience 
(617) 328-9048 

Leave Massage 7/15 



Janl-Clean Co. 

Insured • Certified Professional 

Carpet - Window Cleaners 

1 0% off Carpet Cleaning 

Free Fabric Protector with any 

2 upholsteiy kerns deaned 

(617)341-38S2 M2 



SMALL STUFFI! 

S20 < uft. CiMning, rwnovil, grau cut, 
trimming, brush ramovad, iranchM dug tor 
•tecrical wiring, graval <»»p»n». pajntlr^. 
p<ck-ups, dalvwias. Aho wK about $1 0.00 
ramovaldaal. 

Call John Boy Services 
328-4596 7/15 

CONSTRUCTION 

Roofing, painting, carpen- 
try, porch work, windows, 
door.gutters. Small jobsand 
vinyl siding. FREE esti- 
mates. T. Sweeney 
825-1210 Reliable oAJo 





A&T VACUUM 

• 19.06 OvwhaulSptoU on 
anyvaouum 

• SeiMing machbw rapaMig 
•VCRrapdringandclMming 
•ShaiptnJng 

(scbsors, knIvM, tie.) 
•OrMk XL Vacuums $249 

• BMirolux w^powar nozzle 

$19a 

• Used vacuums $45 & If) 

27BMl«SL,Woaaslon 
479-6066 TF 



AARONS GLASS 

Lowest prices guaranteed. 
Plate and safety glass, 
screens, custom mirrors 
all shapes and colors, 
tabletops. 773-3290 



ATTENTION! 

Help an eager young college 
student finance ftis education 
Looking for: 

- Lawn jobs 

- Hedges Trimming 

- Gutter Cleaning 

- Odd Jobs 

Call for a free estimate and 
help me by letting me fielp you 

471-8541 
Ask for Ted or leave message 

7/22 



YARD SALES 



YARD SALE 

Christ Church 
14 Court Street 
Plymouth, MA 
July 17 9-1 



7/15 



Your SotiMt SImm*^ 

Heatfouartecs 

For 



Appliance 
service 

ONAU 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

1 1S Franklin St . So Quincy 
4/2-1710 

TF 




YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 

Mowing Service 

• Expert Bush & 
Hedge Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 
e Fertilize Lawn 

• Other Work-Ask 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 

Call Bill Fielding 
471-6124 e«6 



^AAAAA^^^^^^MMMMM 



Save Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



750 Sq. FL 

FREE Estimates 

Ace Hardwood Floors 

Woodfloors. Sanded 

Refinished-repalred 

(617)770-3023 7/is 





PRQBMNE' 



O'HARTE MASONRY 

Complete Masonry 

Service Uc. & Ins. 

Phone Ted 

at 773-8622 

aftor 7 p.m. jm 



SULLIVAN TREE SERVICE 

Pruning, removals, 

cableing, fertilizing, 

brush chipping. 

Fully Insund FREE»st 

Mike 472-3595 tm 



Mat 



20LBnANK 

eCHANGE 

$799 

WBTOucrcwr 



Knights of Columbus 

5 Hollis Ave 

Earlybird 7 PM, every 

Wednesday 

2 Winners take all 

Lucky 7s-Bonus 

FREE Coffee-Snacks tm 



Typesetting Equipment 
For Sale 

2 Varityper Compact 351 

with Fonts 

1 Selectline PermaKwik 
Processor 

BEST OFFER 

The Quincy Sun 

1372 Hancock Street 

Quincy 02169 

471-3100 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment mutt accompany order. 



INDEX 



D Services 

a For S«lt 

a Autos 

a Boato 

O For Rent 

a Wanted 

O Help Wanted 

a Ptti, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

'd Real Estate Wanted 

D Miscellaneous 

D Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

O Coins & Stamos 

D Rett Homes 

O Instruction 

O Day Care 

a Personal 

a Electrical A Appliances 



RATES 
1WEEK 
S-7WHKt 

•-12 WEEKS 

IS WEEKS 
ORMOIIE 



D $5.00foronelneertion.upto20wordM0eforeachaddltk)nalword. 
a $4.60perineertionupto20wordafor3-7lneertlon«oftlie»amead, 

1M eacii addittonai word. 
D $4.30 per Insertion up to 20 words for 8-12 inaertions of theaame ad 

10< more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words fori 3 or more Inaertions of th. 

•ame ad, 10< each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ 

In The Quincy Sun 



.for the following ad to run 



-weeks 



COPY: 



HO RCFUfW WILL K MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEAOUNE: MONDAY, 5:00 fM. PLEASC INCLUI>E YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AO. 



Page 20 Quincy San Thursday, July 15, 1993 




Quincy College Freezes T\iition 
For The Fifth Consecutive Year 



GORDON S. JOHNSON of Quincy, left, is awarded a 
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Certificate from Dr. 
Bernard Meylar, associate professor of Suffolk 
University's accounting department. The awards are 
given by the IRS in appreciation for preparing tax 
returns for the elderly, the Beacon Hill community and 
Suffolk University students, staff and administration. 



For the fifth 
consecutive year, Quincy 
College will freeze tuition 
rates, announces College 
President O. Clayton 
Johnsoa 

Quincy College has 
experienced increased 
enrollment each year and 
has seen its student body 
grow to more than 5,000 
full and part-time students. 
"We don't need to raise 
more money," said 
Johnson. 

The college operates on 
a $6.5 million budget and 
holds an additional $3.4 
million surplus, according 
to college officials. 

The two-year college 
offers associate and 



Committee To Elect 

Michael W. 

Morrissey 

Annual Harbor Cruise 
Friday, July 16, 1993 

Boarding Marina Bay, Quincy 7:45 p.m. 
Entertainment and Buffet on Board 

Donation $20.00 
Call 328-0900 to reserve your ticket 




NOW OPEN 




Selections from our Menu 
Garden Greens 

• Ceasar's Salad * Grilled Chicken Salad 

Burgers & Sandwiches 

• 10 oz. Basic Burger * Prime Rib Sandwich 

Little Italy 

• Pizza * Sauteed Chicken Broccoli & Ziti 

Appetizers 

• Ultimate Nachos * Buffalo Wings 

• Fried Chicken Wings • Fried Zuccini 

Charbroiled Specialties 

• Steak Tips • Baby Back Ribs 

• Pork Chops • Roast Prime Rib of Beef 

The Daily Catch 

• Native Broiled Schrod * Broiled Scallops 

• Fish & Chips • Fried Seafood Platter 



Daily Lunch and Dinner Specials 



(617)479-2400 

520 Washington Street, Quincy 



certificate programs as 
well as non-credit 
offerings. Tuition ranges 
from $1700 for full-time 
liberal arts students to 
$3,700 for nursing students. 

Nationwide, colleges 
point to increased 

operating costs and a 
sagging economy, while 
attempting to justify 
tuition increases as high as 
15 percent each year. In 
addition, colleges and 
universities in 

Massachusetts have 
attached additional fees, 
which also increase 
yearly, to the annual cost 
of attendance. Increasing 



costs erratically each year 
often place a college 
education out of the reach 
of many individuals who 
are qualified, but lack the 
financial resources. 

Quincy College attracts 
a diverse student body, 
drawing students from 
throughout Southeastern 
Massachusetts and the 
world. Minority students 
comprise more than 21 
percent of the student 
body. International 

students from more than 35 
nations attend Quincy 
College. 

While the average age 
of a Quincy College 



Our Purple Dinosaur 
Delivers Balloons 




690 Hancock W. • Quincy 
773-0690 




THE SOCIETY OF ST. VINCENT de PAUL in the 

ARCHDIOCESE OF BOSTON, INC. 
announces 

"BUNDLE SUNDAY" 

(replaces tke usual anaual clothing diirc) 

Please help us with your donation of used 

clothing in good condition (please bag or box) 

and non-perishable food items. 

Monetary contributions are also welcome. 

Donations may be made at the foDowlng location: 

Sacred Heart-North Quincy 
July 31 & Aug. 1 

THANK YOU FOR CARING 

Society of St. Vincent de Paul 

1280 Washington Street 

Boston, MA 02118 

Tel: (617) 542-6924 or 1-800-675-2882 




Student in 28, the average 
Quincy College student 
attends Quincy for a 
variety of reasons. Some 
are returning to school 
after raising a family; 
others seek retraining or 
improved skills for better 
jobs; some find Quincy 
College's day and evening 
programs fit their schedule. 

The Quincy campus is 
located across from the 
Quincy Center Red Line 
MBTA station, making it 
accessible to students who 
lack their own 
transportation. 

Suzanne Rochon 
UMass Graduate 

Suzanne E. Rochon 
recently graduated from 
the University of 
Massachusetts at Dart- 
mouth with a bachelor's 
degree in marketing. 

Rochon took part in a 
contract learning project to 
become a consultant for a 
publishing firm in Boston. 

She was a UMass 
cheerleader for football 
and basketball, won the 
coach's award and M.V.P. 
She cheered at the NCAA 
Division 3 Final Four 
basketball tournament in 
Buffalo. 

Currently employed at a 
design firm in Cambridge, 
Suzanne is the daughter of 
Mary Rochon of 
WoUaston. 



^ 



United Way 

/( brmfii oul the best m allot us 



The words you hear 
at South Boston ^ 
Savings / 
Bank: . 




poms" 

The South Boston Savings Bank's "NO POINTS" program is a 
great way to save much needed cash. 

There is no better way to purchase a home, or refinance an 
existing mortgage than with our limited time only "NO POINTS" 
program. 

Choose from a 7-10 or 15 year fixed rate mortgage, or a 1 or 3 
year adjustable rate mortgage. The 15 year rate listed below is just 
one example of our low mortgage rates. Act today . . . you could 

save a bundle! 

ANNUAL 
ANNUAL RATE PERCENTAGE RATE 



15 YEAR 
FIXED RATE 
MORTGAGE 



7375" 7^8'* 



South Boston 
Savings Bank 

ALWAYS THE LEADER' 



lar WEYMOUTH 

E^nrnJbuSlNG MEMBER 5^ Mjun Street 
LENDER FDC/DIF 337-1050 



MAIN OFFICE 


NORTH QUINCY 


460 West Broadway 


440 Hancock Street 


South Boston 


773-8100 


268-2500 






QUINCY 


DORCHESTER 


690 Adams Street 


740 Gallivan Blvd. 


Lakin Square 


825-9090 


479-9660 


NEEDHAM 


WEST ROXBURY 


355 Chestnut St. 


1833 Centre St. 


449^210 


323-8000 





Jf^jqn oVLfl^ci euPwiO [iVWOiii 



VOL. 25 No. 44 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 





HOOT! Clack, a barrd owl, makes his Hancock St. debut 
with the New Eogland Wildlife Center of Hingham 
exhibit during the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival. 



Holding him is Judy Night, an intern at the Wildlife 
Center. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Sheets In Quincy, III. : 7 Have Great 
Pride In The People Of Both Cities' 

200,000 Pounds Of Food, 
Supplies Trucked To Illinois 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

When the last truck 
pulls away from Quincy 
City Hall on either Friday 
or Saturday, an estimated 
200,000 pounds of food 
and supplies and at least 
$9,000 in monetary 
contributions will have 
been collected for the 
flood-ravaged area of 
Quincy, 111. 

Donations for the 
Quincy to Quincy, 111. 
relief effort, will be 
accepted in front of City 
Hall through S p.m. today 
(Thursday), according to 
Quincy Police Patrolman 
Robert Haiuia, one of the 
organizers of the effort. 

Food, tolietries and all 
other kinds of supplies 
except clothing will be 
accepted, Haiuia said. 

Mayor James Sheets 
said Tuesday in a phone 
interview from Illinois that 
the response to the relief 
effort from Quincy and 
South Shore residents and 
businesses has been 
overwhelming. 

"My reaction has been 
one of great pride—pride in 
the people of Quincy, 
Mass. for the outpouring of 
their love, and pride in the 
people of Quincy, 111. for 
the courage they have 
shown throughout this 



ordeal," said Sheets. 

Sheets, who along with 
Quincy Emergency 
Management Deputy 
Director Tony Siciliano 
arrived in Illinois last 
Sunday evening, said the 
devastation wrought by the 
flooding in the area is 
"shocking." He noted that 
he had toured the area in a 
public vehicle Monday 
and planned Tuesday to fly 
over the surrounding 
communities by helicopter 
to get even more of a "real 
sense" of what has 
become of the area. 

"It will take many, 
many months for these 
communities to recover 
from this," said Sheets. 
"Some will never come 
back to normal." 

The mayor said the 
latest numbers he had 
received on the 
devastation wrought by the 
flooding were 31 people 
killed (although none in 
Quincy, 111.) and $10 
billion in damages to 
22,000 homes spread out 
over 16,000 square miles. 

Approximately 10,000 
residents have been left 
homeless as a result of the 
flooding, according to 
Sheets. 

Although Sheets said it 
would be "very difficult" 




LOADING THE DONATIONS for the Quincy to Quincy, 
ni. relief effort into trucks are Quincy Emergency 
Manager Deputy Director Tony Siciliano, co-chairman of 
the effort (rig|it), and volunteer Frank Donadio. 



to predict exactly how 
much of an impact the 
donations from Quincy, 
Mass. and the rest of the 
South Shore will have on 
Quincy, HI., he added that 



the response from Illinois 
residents has been 
indication enough that any 
help at all is appreciated 
by the flood victims. He 



City Census Shows 
Overall Gains 

Minorities 
14% Of 

Population 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

The city's population and demographics continue 
to change, according to local census figures which 
show Quincy 's population has increased slightly to 
86,343 of which 14 percent are now minorities. 



The latest population 
figure represents an 
increase of 1.6 percent or 
1,358 over the 84,985 
residents counted by the 
city's door-to-door census 
in 1992. City Cleric Joseph 
Shea said this year's 
figures, collected through 
the mail, door-to-door and 
over the phone, are 
accurate. 

"Yes, the census is not 
an exact science but the 
figures are accurate," 
Shea said. 

The clerk attributed the 
small increase to fewer 
vacancies in the city's 
rental properties. "There's 
nothing new as far as 
development. In 1991 and 
1992, we found a lot of 
empty apartment rooms 
and condos. This year we 
didn't find them; they're 
occupied." 

One significant change 
in the city's demographics 
is the increase in minority 
residents from 9.7 percent 
or 8,646 in 1992 to 14% or 
12,166 in 1993. Asians are 
still the city's leading 
minority with 10,466 
residents or 12.12 percent 
of Quincy 's population. 

Shea said the census 
shows the number of 
Asians rising in the 
northern section of the 
city. He said there is a 
correlation between Asians 
and public transportation. 
"The MBTA and transit 
has a lot to do with it," he 
said, adding many Asians 
rely on transit for public 
transportation. 

Last year, Asians 
comprised 10 percent of 
Ward 6 (North Quincy- 
Montclair) and 8 percent 
of Ward 5 (Wollaston). 
This year, those figures are 
up to 18 percent and 15 
percent respectively. 

Shea said the city is 
catching up to the influx of 
Asians which occurred in 
Quincy during the 1980s. 
He noted the 1990 state 
census pegged the Asian 



population at 5,577. Last 
year, 9300 Asians were 
counted by city census 
woriceis. 

Essentially, the 
numbers show that Quincy 
is becoming more 
ethnically diverse. In 
addition, Asians are 
becoming more pervasive 
in other areas of Quincy. 

"Asian families seem to 
be leaving rental 
properties in North Quincy 
and Montclair and are 
moving to single-family 
homes in Southwest 
Quincy and Quincy Point. 
Some are also moving to 
Adams Shore and Houghs 
Neck. 

"Over the last three 
years, the Asian 
population has evened out 
in its distribution. They 
are now situated 
throughout the city," Shea 
said. 

The number of black 
and Hispanic residents 
also increased but only 
slightly. Each group 
continues to represent 
approximately one percent 
of the city's population. 

Shea said black 
residents tend to live in 
Southwest Quincy and 
Germantown. He said 
Hispanic residents live 
throughout the city. 

Census figures 

regarding age and gender 
breakdowns for the city 
were not available at press 
time. 

The increase in 
population occurred city- 
wide. The biggest jump 
happetied in Ward 3 which 
went up 428 people, from 
13,964 to 14,392. Ward 2 
had the smallest gain with 
16 people, from 14,375 to 
14,391. 

Other increases, by 
ward, are: Ward 1, 186 
(from 14,094 to 14,280); 
Ward 4, 324 (from 14,165 
to 14,489); Ward 5, 165 
(from 14,278 to 14,441); 
and Ward 6, 241 (from 
14,109 to 14,350.) 



Sidewalk Festival Stories, 
Photos Pages 10-11 



jtmUmmtmiiMm 



Page 2 Quincy Sua Thursday, July 22, 1993 

Museum Plank Owner 




Morning application of 
the pesticide resmethrin 
for the control of adult 
mosquitoes will continue 
this week, according to the 
Quincy Health 

Department. 

Spraying was scheduled 
for today (Thursday) from 
2 to 7 a.m. in selected 
areas of Ouincv east of 

Savt Qm» and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



Hancock St. and east of 
Washington St., which 
may include some of the 
following neighborhoods: 
Squantum, eastern 

portions of Atlantic, 
Norfolk Downs, coastal 
Wollaston, Merrymount, 
Houghs Neck, 

Germantown, and coastal 
Quincy Point. 

Other sprayings had 
been scheduled for last 
Tuesday in selected areas 
of Quincy west of Hancock 
and Washington Sts. 



Not all areas as 
described above will be 
entirely sprayed on a given 
date. Attempts will be 
made to spray as large an 
area of western Quincy on 
Tuesdays and as large an 
area of eastern Quincy on 
Thursdays. 

If inclement weather 
occurs or equipment fails, 
the application will be 
added to the next 
scheduled day, or 

rescheduled for the 
following day. 



QUINCY RESIDENTS!! 

Sick and Tired of Repetitive 
Flood Damage To Your Home? 

Don't reconstruct your home to 

pre-flood conditions. Retrofit your 

home to prevent further damage! 

Eligible projects include: 

• Relocation of heating systems 

• Relocation of electrical panels and/or wiring 

• Elevation of washers, driers and other appliances 

• Sealing (floodproofing) of windows, doors and bulkheads 

• Construction of interior/exterior floodwalls 

• Anchoring/elevation of oil storage tanks and hot water heaters 

• Construction of new utility room 

• Elevation of residential structures 
•and MORE!!! 

Certain Restrictions Apply. For more information 
and a program application contact: 



1^ 

EQUAlHOUSmC 



OFFICE OF HOUSING REHABILITATION 
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING 
AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
1305 Hancock Street, 3rd noor, Old City Hall 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Telephone: 376-1050 or 376-1055, 
(8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday thru Friday) 

This program is funded through Quincy's Community Development Block 
Grant Program (CDBG) and the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, which is 
jointly administered through the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Management Agency and the Federal Emergaicy Management Agency (FEMA). 




LARRY GANGI, right, co-owner of Pete's Grille in Quincy, presents a $1,000 donation to 
Bill MacMullen, executive director of the U.S. Naval and Shipbuilding Museum. Gangi 
and many other local business people and other citizens have become "plankowners" of 
the museum by contributing $1,000 to the museum. The benefactors also become 
special life-time members of the museum which is scheduled to open in the fall at the 
Fore River Shipyard, Quincy Point. For mure information about the museum or to 
malie a donation, call 479-7900 or visit the museum office at 1250 Hancock St., 
(Presidents Place) Quincy Center. (Quincy Sun photo by Robert Bosworth) 

Mosquito Spraying Continues 



FOOD AND SUPPLIES pile up in lobby of Quincy City Hall for shipment to flood victims in 

Quincy, HI. 

(Quincv Sun photo bv Tom Gorman) 

200,000 Pounds 

Of Food, Supplies 

Trucked To Quincy, 111. 



Cont'd From Page 1 

said that when he and 
Siciliano, along with a 
truck donated by Stop & 
Shop filled with food and 
supplies, pulled into 
Quincy, 111. about 9:30 p.m. 
(Illinois time), Illinois 
residents had only had a 
couple of hours' notice 
about their impending 
arrival. 

"I thought 10 or 15 
people would be there," 
said Sheets. "There were 
at least 500 people, 
honking their horns, 
turning their car lights on, 
waving and cheering. It 
made me proud to be 
mayor of the City of 
Quincy. It was as if the 
two communities had 
touched one another." 

Siciliano, who drove to 
Illinois with Sheets in a 
Mercury Villager donated 
by Fore River Motors, 
described the scene as 
"unbeUevable." 

"We're all men and we 
all like to use the word 
'macho,' but I'll tell you, I 
had tears in my eyes," 
said Siciliano. "It was 
spectacular." 

Among those present 
that evening were Quincy, 
111. Mayor Chuck Scholz 
and former Mayor Verne 
Hagstrom, Sheets said. 

On Monday night. 
Sheets was given a key to 
the city and a 
proclamation at a meeting 
of the Quincy, 111. City 
Council, and the day was 
proclaimed "Quincy, 
Mass. Day." 

Sheets, who said he 
hopes to be back in 
Quincy, Mass. by 



Saturday, said Quincy, 111. 
will be set up as a center 
through which food and 
other donations will be 
distributed by the local 
Red Cross. Siciliano said 
he will stay in lUinois a 
little longer to help 
oversee the distribution. 

The mayor added that 
when he returns home, he 
will collect as many 
photographs of the flood- 
ravaged area as possible 
and put together a 
scrapbook for all South 
Shore residents to see. 

"People should see 
what I have seen," said 
Sheets. "I would like to 
put together a photograph 
narrative and put it on 
display at the Thomas 
Crane Library." 

He also said that if the 
need arises, Quincy, Mass. 
will not hesitate to again 
come to the aid of Quincy, 

m. 

"I think the people of 
Quincy, Mass. would be 
willing to do whatever 
they could do (in the 
future)," said Sheets. "I'm 
sure we'll continue to 
respond.'" 

The Quincy to Quincy, 
111. relief effort began July 
13 under the direction of 
Veteran Services Director 
Hank Bradley and 
Siciliano. After 

experiencing chest pains 
July 15, Bradley was 
briefly hospitalized and 
forced to take a few days 
off from woik. 

After Sheets and 
Siciliano left for Illinois 
last Saturday^ Hanna 
assumed the responsibility 
of overseeing the local 
food collection in front of 



City Hall. 

Hanna said a second 
truck donated by Stop & 
Stop and a third donated 
by Shaw's were scheduled 
to leave from City Hall 
Tuesday. The fourth and 
final truck, to be donated 
by either Ryder Truck 
Rental or New England 
Tractor Trailer, should 
leave on Friday or 
Saturday, he said. 

Hanna added that in 
addition to the trucks they 
donated to the relief effort. 
Stop & Shop and Shaw's 
also contributed pallets of 
food to the cause. Other 
local businesses that 
donated food and supplies, 
he said, included Star 
Market, Wollaston 
Market, Harvard 

Community Health Plan, 
Procter & Gamble, Frito- 
Lay and "a lot of other 
smaller groups." 

The relief effort has 
also received an 
abundance of coverage 
from Massachusetts, 
Illinois and even national 
media, including NBC- 
TV's "Today" show. 

Both Sheets and 
Siciliano expressed 
gratitude to all of the 
residents, businesses, 
volunteers and media 
representatives who have 
made the relief effort, 
which spanned over 1,200 
miles, such a success. 

"It's been absolutely 
heart-rendering," said 
Sheets. 

"There was a lot of love 
in this project," added 
Siciliano. "It's something 
I'll never forget as long as 
I live." 



MBTA Performing Maintenance Work 



The MBTA is 
performing track and right 
of way maintenance work 
along the MBTA tracks in 
the Newport Ave.-St. Ann's 
section of the city. 

Bernice Mader, 
administrative assistant to 
Mayor James Sheets and 
Quincy representative to 



the MBTA Advisory 
Board, said the work 
began last Sunday and wiU 
continue through the early 
morning hours of Satuiday, 
July 31. 

Because the track 
maintenance must be 
performed when trains are 
not running, the work take 
place from ^proximately 



1 to 5 a.m., Mader said. 
The MBTA has said it will 
make every effort to 
suppress noise during the 
procedure, she added. 

Residents with 

questions or complaints 
should call MBTA 
Customer Relations at 

722-5215. 



Over 400 Attend Swearing-in Ceremony 

Judge Warren Powers: 
'I'm Here To Serve You' 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quiocy Sun Page 3 



By PAUL HAROLD 

Native Quincy son 
Warren Powers was sworn 
in as Associate Justice of 
Quincy District Court at a 
State House ceremony last 
week attended by more 
than 400 friends, relatives 
and associates. 

The largest gathering in 
recent years of Quincy and 
Norfolk County law and 
political leaders filled the 
House of Representatives 
chamber where Lt. Gov. 
Paul Cellucci 

administered the oath to 
Powers. 

Cellucci said that he 
and Gov. William Weld 
who appointed Powers to 
the bench were confident 
his integrity and abilities 
will make him a good 
judge. 

Powers, who grew up in 
WoUaston and served as 
Ward 5 City Councillor 
from 1974 to 1977 and in 
the Norfolk County District 
Attorney's office as an 
administrator and assistant 
for nearly a quarter 
century told the audience : 
"The district court is 
extremely important 
because it is the first level 
the citizen has to address 
his or her grievances. 
We'll be in Quincy to 
serve you." 

Judge Powers thanked his 
family and colleagues for 



their help in his career 
achievement with special 
words for his mother and 
wife. 

Dist. Atty. William 
Delahunt presided at the 
ceremony from the 
Speakers' podium, sharing 
the platform with former 
Dist. Atty. George Burice, a 
long-time personal friend 
of the new judge and the 
Powers family, and former 
Atty. Gen. Francis Bellotti, 
all WoUaston residents. 

Bellotti called Weld's 
selection of Powers "a 

truly wonderful 

appointment" . . . "our 
court (Quincy) is in good 
hands." 

Noting Powers' long 
service in the district 
attorney's office, Bellotti 
added : 

"That you could 
prosecute cases for 23 
years and people still like 
you, speaks volumes to the 
respect you are held and of 
your judicial 

temperament." 

Powers started his legal 
career in Burke's law 
office and in Burke's 
district attorney's office. 

Looking on proudly 
were members of the 
Powers family: 

His wife, the former 
Holly Grazioso of Quincy; 
his mother, Alice Powers 
not of St. Petersburg, Fla., 



his brother, William, 
sister, Leslie and his in- 
laws, Alfred and Helen 
Grazioso formerly of 
WoUaston now living in 
Rockland. 

Also attending were 
former Quincy political 
colleagues Mayor James 
Sheets, former Mayor 
Arthur Tobin, now clerk- 
magistrate of Quincy 
District Court, former City 
Councillors Daniel 
Raymond, Dennis 
Harrington and Paul 
Harold and present 
Councillors Charles 
Pbelan and Ted 
DeCristofaro. 

Judge Charles Black, 
presiding justice of Quincy 
District Court with whom 
Judge Powers will work, 
attended as did Senator 
Michael Morrissey, Rep. 
Steve Tobin, Rep. Ron 
Mariano, Norfolk County 
Register of Probate 
Thomas Hughes, Quincy 
City Clerk Joseph Shea 

and Assistant City Clerk 
Patricia Toland. 

Judge Powers will 
succeed Judge Lewis 
Whitman who recently 
retired. 

Former Rep. John Rood 
has been nominated to fill 
the other vacancy at 
Quincy District Court and 
is awaiting confirmation 
by the Governor's Council. 



Bradley Expected Back 
To Work This Week 



Veterans Services 
Director Hank Bradley was 
expected to return to work 
this week after suffering 
chest discomfort last 
Friday which forced him to 
spend a night at Quincy 
Hospital. 

Bradley, who is co- 
chairman of the Quincy to 
Quincy, 111. relief effort, 
was resting comfortably at 
home Monday after being 



released from the hospital 
last Saturday morning. He 
had experienced chest 
discomfort while helping 
to coordinate the food 
drive. 

Bob LaFleur, Veterans 
Services Graves 

Registration Officer, said 
everyone at Veterans 
Services was relieved that 
Bradley was feeling better. 

"He suffered some 



discomfort in his chest 
area, but doctors said it 
was just a lot of stress," 
said LaFleur. "He should 
be back to work in a 
couple of days." 

The Quincy to Quincy, 
Dl. relief effort is being co- 
chaired by Quincy 
Emergency Management 
Deputy Director Tony 
Siciliano. 



FLY TO 
CAPE COD 
BY BOAT! 

Back by popular demand - 
our 2-1/2 hour cruise 
to Provincetown! 

Fly by the highways and bridges. 

This is the fastest, most fun way 

to the tip of Cape Cod! 

Spend 4 hours exploring the sights, 

shops, and streetside eatenes. You can 

even explore the sand dunes, or climb the 

Pilgrim Monument and see back to Boston! 

After your fun-filled day, relax with a 
cocktail on your cruise back as we watch 
the sun set over the Boston skyline. 

Sailing from Bay Pointe Marina in Quincy, 
•very Wednesday & Thursday, June 23- 
Sept. 2. Departs at 9, returns at 6:30. Kids 
age 8 and under go free. 

617*770«1008 



t-1^ 



r Quincy to 

• Provincetown 
BOAT EXPRESS 



Located 3/4 mile north of the fore River Bridge otf Rt 3A 
Bay Pointe Manna. Washington Court. Quincy 




Most trips sell out — 
reservations are necessary 




NEW QUINCY DISTRICT Court Associate Justice Warren Powers, former Quincy city 
councillor and resident, takes Ills oatii from Lt. Gov. Paul Cellucci at a ceremony in the 
House of Representatives cliamber at the State House. 

(Nicole St. Peter Photo) 



Kolson Wants K-9 
Unit Back In Police Dept. 



Ward 1 Councillor City Council's Public 



Peter Kolson wants to 
bring the K-9 unit back to 
the Quincy Police 
Department as a deterrent 
to crime. 

Kolson said he has 
talked with Mayor James 
Sheets and Police Chief 
Francis Mullen and they 
agree the return of the 
canine patrol would be 
effective in crime 
prevention. 

Kolson, chairman of the 



Safety Committee, said 
the K-9 unit would be "a 
very effective tool in both 
crime prevention and in 
drug investigations." 

"The canines have 
proven over and over again 
to be very useful in the 
prevention of criminal 
activity and in the 
apprehension process. 

"In fact, depending on 
the number of arrests made 
this unit could be self- 



supporting. After arrests 
are made in the seizure of 
drugs, property is seized as 
well and later sold." 

Kolson said members of 
the Police Department 
"are enthusiastic" about 
the possible return of the 
canine patrol. 

"The use of dogs has 
proven in the pst to be 
economically effective," 
he said. "I am optimistic 
this unit will be back in 
service within the next few 
months." 



i 




.39 CHEESEBURGERS 



\ 



^1^ 




BONUS FRIES 



Cimit 10 Burgers per family 
Good only at: 275 Hancock Street, Quincy 



Page 4 Quincv Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 



OPINION 




'J^' 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh. Editor 



30< per copy. $12.00 p«r yMr by mail In Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outalda Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Ouincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St . Quincy. Mass 02169 



The Ouincy Sun atsumas no financiil respon$it<>ily for 
typographic!' error* m ■dvenisements but will reprint that 
part ot an adverlsefreni in which the typographical error 
occurs 



C^tf:JHh 




BOB THE PORCUPINE is petted-carefully-by children 
as he munches a snack during the New England Wildlife 
Center's animal exhibit at the Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival. 




U.S. SAVINGS BONDS 



^ Medically 
^ Speaking 

by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.CC 




YET ANOTHER KICK FOR "THE HABfT* 



It's been one bit of bad 
news after another for 
smokers during the past 
year, including a boot out 
the door by First Lady 
Hilary Clinton. (Smoking is 
no longer permitted any- 
where inside the White 
House.) Now scientists are 
reporting that smoking can 
smother the effectiveness 
of radiation therapy for 
cancer patients. There has 
long been plentiful docu- 
mentation of the link be- 
tween cigarette smoking 
and certain cancers, in- 
cluding those of the head, 
neck and lungs. However, 
recent research has shown 
that patients who continue 
smoking during radiation 
treatments for cancers of 
the head and neck were 
much less likely to be alive 
more than two years after 
therapy than those who did 
not smoke during treat- 
ment. 
P.S. Smoking is directly 



responsible for about one- 
fourth of heart attack 
deaths and 20 percent of 
all cancer deaths. 

The new research be- 
ing done on the link be- 
tween smoking and 
slower cancer recovery 
provides yet another 
wonderful reason to kick 
the habit today. If you 
woukJ like to learn more 
about this topic, or about 
how you can modify your 
lifestyle to help ward off 
heart disease , call me, Dr. 
Antonelli, or Dr. Dunlap at 
COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE at 472- 
2550. Office hours are by 
appointment. Our new 
office offers a pleasant 
surrounding for medical 
care, and is located in 
Crown Colony, 700 Con- 
gress St., Suite 2C, in 
Quincy. I am affiliated with 
Quincy Hospital and 
South Shore Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



The Ward 5 Connection 



T 




he swearing-in ceremony for new Quincy Dis- 
trict Court associate Justice Warren Powers 
stirred fond 
memories of 
the "Ward 5 
Connec- 
tion." 



Especially for 
Norfolk County 
Dist. Atty. WiUiam 
Delahunt, former 
Atty. Gen. and Lt. 
Gov. Frank Bellotti 
and former Dist. 
Atty. George DELAHUNT BELLOTTI 

Burke, who like Powers himself, got their political start 
in Wollaston's Ward 5. 

Delahunt presided over the ceremony last week in 
the filled House of Representatives chamber where Lt. 
Gov. Paul Cellucci administered the oath to the new 
judge as family, friends and associates looked on. 

Delahunt got things off on a light note that brought 
back the memories when he recalled that Bellotti once 
endorsed Powers over him. 

That was 1971 when Delahimt and Powers ran for 
the Ward 5 City Council seat Walter Harmon vacated 
to make a successful bid for Mayor. 

Delahunt defeated Powers for the seat. 

'That' s how much a Bellotti endorsement is worth," 
he kidded Bellotti, his since long-time friend. 

Two years later when Delahunt gave up the seat after 
being elected state representative, Powers won it, de- 
feating the late Michael Peatridge. 

As Biu-ke sat there watching a man he has known 
since boyhood become a judge, he found himself 
wandering back to the early 1940's. That's when the 
Powers and Burke families became across-the-street 
neighbors on Lincoln Ave. in Wollaston. 

Burke, who is nine years older than Powers, became 
like an older brother to him. 

Years later when George and Sandy Burke became 
parents of their only son, George, it was only natural 
that they asked Powers to be his Godfather. 

When Burke decided to enter the political field in 
1 959 as a candidate for the Ward 5 seat, Powers was his 
campaign manager. Burke won and went on to become 
state representative and district attorney (1966) with 
Powers nmning the successful campaigns. 

When Powers ran for the Ward 5 seat, Burke headed 
his campaign. And it was Burke who got Bellotti to 



endorse Powers over Delahunt which is always good 
for a little ribbing when the four get together. 

Burke, as district attorney, appointed Powers an 
administrator in his office in 1969 and then assistant 
district attorney in 1971 after Powers graduated from 
law school and passed the bar. 

When Delahunt became district attomey in 1 975, he 
knew a good man when he saw one and retained 
Powers. Before his appointment as a judge. Powers 
was in charge of all district court jury trials in Norfolk 
County. 

The last three Norfolk County district attorneys 
have come out of Wollaston and served as Ward 5 
councillor: Myron Lane, Burke and Delahunt in that 
order. 

Burke had hoped that Powers would be the fourth if 
Delahunt retired or went on to another office. 

"Warren will be an outstanding judge," says Burke. 
"And he would have been an outstanding district 
attomey." 

Powers and his wife, the former Holly Grazioso, of 
Quincy, who now live in Norfolk, were recently hon- 
ored at a siuprise party on their 25th wedding anni- 
versary in Rockland where her parents, Alfred and 
Helen Grazioso now live. 

Burke who was at the party, recalled the couple met 
when he was nmning for disttict attomey in 1966. 
Powers was the campaign manager and Holly became 
a volunteer. 

"I started to notice that Warren was spending more 
time in the office after Holly joined us," Burke smiles. 

Family and friends mean a lot to Powers. 

His mother, Alice, now a Florida resident, brother 
Bill, and sister, Leshe and his inlaws were there at the 
ceremony. But three people dear to him who would 
have been there couldn't be. 

And it was in their memory — his late father, John, 
brother, Ray, and close friend Atty. Richard Barry — 
Powers asked for a moment of silence in their honor. It 
was his first act as a judge. 

With almost a quarter of a century of service in the 
district attorney's office as an administrator, assistant 
district attomey and head of the district court jury trials. 
Powers has the experience and background for his new 
job. 

Add to that the compassion he has been noted for all 
his life and you've got the ingredients for an outstanding 
jurist. 

Quincy District Court is going to like him. 

Welcome home. Your Honor. 



Adams National Historic Site 
To Host Children's Story Hours 



The Adams National 
Historic Site, National 
Park Service will host its 
first of three "Story Hours" 
July 25 at 1 p.m. at the 
John Adams and John 



Quincy 
Birthplaces, 
Franklin St. 



Adams 
133-141 



.siEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



The "Story Hours" are 
designed to introduce the 
site to visitors under 10 
years old with each having 
a different theme relating 
to the environment of the 
childhood of President 
John Quincy Adams. At 

Save Gat and Mon«y 
Shop Locally 



each story hour, stories are 
told by national Park 
Ranger in the yards of the 
childhood homes of the 
second and sixth president. 
The program is free and 
held weather permitting. 

Themes for the series 
are: 

July 25: "A Magic 
Carpet Ride!", stories from 
around the world. 

Aug. 22: "Heroes and 
Heroines From Our Past", 
stories that show people 
can make a difference! 

Oct. 3: "A Harvest 

Festival" celebrates 
America farming past. 



Eleanor Tupper will 
demonstrate colonial 
quilting and Evelyn Wade 
will demonstrate colonial 
knitting with the children 
as they prepare for the 
cold colonial winter. 

The John Adams and 
John Quincy Adams 
Birthplaces are part of the 
Adams National Historic 
Site, a unit of the National 
park Service which 
commemorates the 
Presidential Adams family 
and their distinguished 
descendants. For more 
informalion contact the 
National Park Service 
Visitor Center at 770-117.'^. 



J 



As McCauley Sees It 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 5 



Presidents Place A 
Significant Plus For City 



By FRANCIS X. McCAULEY 
Former Mayor of Quincy 

At a recent City Council meeting, the subject of the 
Presidents Place development project was the topic of 
discussion. One city councillor was quoted as saying 
that the city "lost big on the project." 

Wrong, Joe. 

On Jan. 3, 1984, during the latter part of my second 
inaugural address, I addressed the subject of downtown 
Quincy: 

"While much has been done in the downtown area, 
much remains to be done. Some four and a half years 
after Sears Roebuck left Quincy to go to the Braintree 
Plaza, that store, despite our best efforts, remains 
empty. We also have an area in our downtown that is 
badly in need of upgrading. That's the area... bounded by 
the Bargain Center and the Saville Avenue and Faxon 
Roads. During my riext administration I will be giving 
carefiil attention to both of these projects." 

As for the Sears building, the city was able to 
attract a well-known South Shore developer, Frank 
Messina, to purchase refurbish and rent out the 
property. And while my 1984 inaugural address will not 
go down in history along with Lincoln's Gettysburg 
Address (1863) or Winston Churchill's "Blood, ToU, 
Tears and Sweat" speech (1940), those comments 
back in 1984 provided the impetus that led to the 
development of Presidents Place. 

In late 1985 a joint venture between the Campanelli 
Construction Co. of Braintree, the Quincy-based 
Ricciardi Co. and the Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 
purchased the property along with the Bargain Center. 

The development of Presidents Place in the late 
1980s was a prime example of a cooperative effort 
between the public and private sectors. A citizens' task 



force, headed by former City Councillor Leo Kelly, 
worked with project architects to develop a suitable 
design for the project. 

The city departments of Plaimings and Communities 
and Development obtained a state grant of $780,000 for 
infrastructure improvements, and the city solicitor's 
office, working with the developers and the Norfolk 
County Commissioners, developed a plan that resulted 
in the construction of a modem educational facility for 
Quincy College. 

In fiscal year 1989, total revenues derived from 
these parcels totalled $208,558, while in FY 1993, 
after the completion of the two commercial buildings, 
$904,403 was realized, an increase in revenue of 
$698,845 or 335 percent. 

While Phases One and Two of the construction of 
the twin towers of eight and five stories have been 
completed. Phase Three--the construction of 209 

condominiums-was never undertaken. The collapse of 
the condo market made this phase unfeasible. 

Had the condo project been completed, the city 
would have received a one-time payment of $300,000. 
Yet to say the city "lost" $300,000 on the project is 
ridiculous. The city invested no money in that phase of 
the project and has suffered no losses. Some day, as 
the economy improves, this parcel will be developed 
and put on the tax rolls. 

Today, Presidents Place is a showplace in 
downtown Quincy. Mayor Sheets, working with federal 
officials, has been successftil in obtaining federal fijnds 
to open a Visitors Center for the tourists to obtain 
information about Quincy 's many historic sites. 

All in all. Presidents Place has been a significant 
plus for the City of Quincy. 



» 



HEALTH STOP '" 
BRAINTREE 



Health Stop ./Braintree 

759 Granite Street 

Braintree, MA 02184 

(617) 848-1950 



Your Neighborhood Doctor's Office 



COMPLETE FAMILY 
HEALTH SERVICES 

• On Site Lab & X-Ray 

• Continuing Care for Hypertension, 
Diabetes, Asthma & Allergies 

• Minor Emergency Care 

• Women's Health Care 



Now Participating in 
Pilgrim Health Care 

and 
Tufts Managed Care 

David Egilman M.D., MPH Board Certified in 
Internal and Preventive/Occupational Medicine 






Mon-Fri 8 am-7 pm • Sat 8 am-1 pm 

No Appointment Necessary 

We submit to Blue Shield, Medicare, 

Medicaid and other major insurance plans 



Quincy Health Stop Patients: 
You may continue your medical care at 

Health Stop/Braintree, 
where your records are now available. 



6 



• !•]§ 



NEWS QUINCY! 



\ 



t\l\ 



Mo, /'I 

V^J OUINCV 1 I* > 

Our city. In cooperation with BFI, Browning-Ferris Industries, has 
expanded Its recyclable materials to include the following 
items: 

HOUSEHOLD PAPER MIX 



• JUNK MAIL 

• MIXED OFFICE PAPERS 

• MAGAZINES 

• SHREDDED OFFICE PAPERS 

• NOTE PAPER 



•COPY PAPER 
•DRAWING PAPER 

• PHONE BOOKS 

• BOXBOARD 

(e.g. Cereal Boxes, etc ) 



if ' 



m 



THE FOLLOWING CANNOT BE ACCEPTED AT THIS TIME, 
PLEASE DO NOT PLACE IN RECYCLING BIN. 

NO PLASTIC COATED PAPERS NO NAPKINS 
NO CARBON PAPER NO PAPER CUPS 

NO TISSUE NO PAPER PLATES 



QUESTIONS? If you have any questions regarding the recycling 
program, please call the Quincy DPW HOTLINE at 770-BINS. 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



Eastern Mass 

Replaces Trolleys 

With Modern Buses 

John I. Donovan, chairman of the public trustees of the 
Eastern Mass wStreet Railway, said modem bus service will 
replace street cars in Quincy in a very short time. 

The only stumbling block, said Donovan, is an old World 
War I agreement with the _^ 



July 22-28 

1947 

46 Years Ago 



Navy that the company sup- 
ply streetcar service toQuincy 
Point. The company was ne- 
gotiating with the Navy to 
modify the agreement. 

During World War I the ——«-««..., 

Navy financed construction of the Quincy Point street car 
service to provide better transportation to the Fore River 
Shipyard. Eastern Mass agreed to repay the Navy on a per 
capita passenger basis. 

"It has been our hope," said Donovan, "that all trolleys 
should be eliminated fi-om our system and last year a start 
was made on the South Shore when buses were substituted 
for street cars on the Houghs Neck line. 

"Our general counsel has been of the opinion that for us 
to remove troDey service without permission of the Navy 
would be a technical violation of the present contract we 
have with it. 

NOISE ABATEMENT PLANNED 
Mayor Charies A. Ross conferred with Gipt. Otho O. 
Smoot, commanding officer of the Squantum Naval Air 
Station, and they announced a new plan to counteract the 
noise of planes taking off fi^om the base. 

Cq)t. Smoot said from now on planes will gain altitude 

over the Neponset River and make no turns until they reach 

1 ,000 feet or more and then follow the water to skirt the city. 

FORE RIVER SHIPS NEEDED 

Admiral William H. P.Blandy, commander in chief of the 

Atlantic Fleet, indicated that the Navy still had need for the 

unfinished ships at the Fore River Shipyard, the heavy 

cmisers Des Moines, SaJem and Northampton. 

"In any overseas campaign where we take the offensive 
we would need a fleet whether the other fellow has one or 
not," said Admiral Blandy on a visit to Boston. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Eleven girls and one boy fix)m Quincy returned home 
after a 1 2-day educational vacation in Harlem, co-sponsored 
by the Quincy Point Congregational Church and Grace 
Congregational Church in Harlem . . . Maude Hurd of 
Quincy, a secretary in the Quincy Electric Light and Power 
Co,, was a member of a party of women who were returning 
by boat fi"om Nahant when they spotted the first whale seen 
in Boston Harbor in 300 years . . . Hamburg was 39 cents at 
the Meateries, Inc., 1388 Hancock St. . . . Ten Quincy 
veterans were named permanent firemen — James W. Gerry, 
Russell J. Barry, Cornelius E. 0'Connell,ThomasF. Maguire, 
Charles H. Daley, George D. McEachera, Lester Haslett, 
WiUiam A. McGunagle, Patrick J. Sullivan and LavTence J. 
Ready . . . Selden Garry Becker, son of Mr. aiKl Mrs. 
Ferrender C. Negus of 44 Russell St, North Quincy, was 
commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army at Fort 
Benning, Ga . . . Dr. Edwin E. Smith, city bacteriologist for 
25 years, left for Goldsboro, N.C., to take a job as assistant 
to the district health officer of Wayne and Green counties . 
. . Ice cream was 59 cents a quart at Hunter's, 537 Sea St., 
Houghs Neck . . . The 72-foot ketch Ticonderoga, built at the 
Quincy Adams Yacht Yard, was first over the line in the 366- 
mile Maiblehead to Halifax race in 50 hours and 30 minutes 
... A strike of East Coast shipyard workers idled 7,000 
members of Local 5 at the Fore River Shipyard for the fourth 
week . . . Two salmon, weighing about 75 pounds each, 
caught by members of the Quincy party attending the Elks 
convention in Portland, Ore., were shipped to QuirKy to be 
eaten at a lodge dinner-meeting . . . "The Yearling," starring 
Gregory Peck, Jane Wyman and Claude Jarman, Jr., was 
playing at the Strand . . . Joseph Mula of Quincy and John F. 
Nihen of Dorchester, aerographers at the Squantum Naval 
Air Station, spotted a flying disc moving at 300 miles an hour 
about 8,000 feet over Milton ... A two-family house, five 
rooms up and five rooms down, on Putnam St., Wollaston, 
was selling for $10,500 . . . Pvt. Thomas R. Perkins and Pvt. 
Edward J. DuBois, both of Quincy , were assigned as trainees 
to the Universal Military experimental unit at Ft. Knox, Ky. 



Pag* 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 



Central 7th Graders 
Spend Week At Camp 



Storyteller At Crane 
Library July 27 



Seventh grade students 
at Central Middle School 
recently spent a week in 
the annual out-of-doors 
classroom at Camp Wing 
in Duxbury. 

Members of the Central 
staff augmented by parent 
volunteers and friend of 
the school were the 
instructors. 

Goal of this program is 
to provide a climate for 
learning and living 
together as students 
become more aware of 
their environment and 
develop a deeper 
appreciation for the world 
around them. Problem 
solving took on many 
aspects as students woiked 
as teams creatively and 



critically. Coordinator of 
the week's program was 
Head Counselor Mary 
Catherine lannoni. 

Programs this year 
included Arts and Crafts 
(Camp Wing, rock 
jewelry, pendants and 
beads, wreath making), 
boats and safety, fishing 
golfing, goofy sports, 
Martha's Vineyard bike 
trip, orienteering, Plimoth 
Plantation trip, pond study, 
problem solving, sand 
sculpturing, sports seminar 
(Basketball, Soccer), 
swimming, tennis, whale 
watching trip. Who Dunnit 
Mystery Clinic. 

Junior counselors who 
assisted staff and students 



OfeCia V, ViCCanueva, 'D.(M:,(D, 

GENERAL DENTISTRY 

New Patient Special 
$50 off services 

339 HANCOCK STREET 

NORTH QUINCY, MA 02171 

Free Consultation 

OFFICE HOURS 

BYAPPOl^^TME^4T (617)328-4646 



were Robert Abom, Justin 
Ackcrman, Christian 
Ciavario. Nicholas 
Kazolias. Christopher 
Lebo, John McCarthy, 

Kevin Price, Terrence 
Roche, Luke Sheet.s, 
Maryann Ashworth, 
Christine Barrett, Meighan 
Barry, Kerry DesRoche, 
Kristin Fluhr, Claire 
McCarthy, Tracy 

O'SuUivan Heather Stuart 
and Wendy Sweetser. 

Central staff members 
who taught at the camp 
were Susan Aborn, 
Luciann Baker, John 
Buckley, Fred Crowther, 
Brian Flaherty, J. Thomas 
Henderson, William 
McWeeny, Laurence 
Osborne, Kenneth Panaro, 
James Piccini, Eileen 
Rowbotham, Mary 
Schiess, Margaret 
Spencer, Edward Steele, 
Ann Vella and Miss 
lannoni. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
H«rt'» a chanct to earn 
•lira money by building a' 
Quincy Sun horn* dallvery 
routt. 

Telaphona: 471-3100 



Storyteller Alicia 
Quintano will perform 
Tuesday, July 27 at 7 p.m. 
at the Thomas Crane 
Pubhc Library, Quincy Sq. 

The program is 
supported, in part, by the 
Quincy Arts Council, a 
local agency, the 
Massachusetts Cultural 
Council, a state agency, 
and the National 
Endowment for the Arts. 

Quintano 's performance 
is for children age five and 
older and adults. 

Quintano has travelled 
to 20 states, performing at 
festivals and in libraries, 
elementary schools, 
universities and theatres. 
Her original stories and 
selections from American 
and international folklore 
bring the world to listeners 
of all ages. 

Quintano trained as a 
professional actress with 
the Barter Theatre in 
Abingdon, Va. She toured 
in children's theatre and 
was theatre director at the 
Aaron Copland Music and 
Arts Program for children 
in New York State. Her 
storytelling appearances 
include the Gloucester 



Di^incnu M. >li\izziilln, MD 



:\c ni\ 



We have 
moved, but 
our focus 
hasn't 
changed! 

Currently accepting new patients. 



iind .St(/' 



Dr. Dotnenic Strazzulla and 
his staff are pleased to 
announce the relocation of 
their ophthalmic offices. We're 
in the same building, on the 
same floor — our offices have 
just moved around the coiner! 
Our address and phone 
number remain the same. 

This move will allow us to 
belter serve our patients wdth 
state-of-the-art, quality eye 
care in a more spacious and 
comfortable environment. 



Domenic M. Strazzulla, MD 
Crown Colony Office Park 
500 Congress Street 
Suite lA-1 
Quincy, MA 02169 
(617) 770-1505 



Providing state-of-the-art 
eye care, now and into the 
future: 

■ caffiraci surgery 
m lens implant-s 

■ in-ofTtcc laser surgery 

■ ireainu'tu for glaucoma and 
diabetic eye disease 

Df. UtrazmUa h a Jtwrci trrti/ted 






RECEPTION HALLS 



ISTYIJSH120-SEATEV 

OBCOVOaNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

THOUGHT TQ BE 

The sttret's out 

functton room at Amdi«'s| 
has beoomc one of Boston's 
most popular spots (or uied- 

diTigs, shouucrs, corporate 
meetings, and get togethers 

of all kinds VUe feature an 
extensive menu at affordable | 
prices We overlook Marina 
Bay and the Boston skyline 
We'd like to make your next 
function really fly. 

|l Plcas«eaD 617471 1453. 



AMELIAS 



O^Victotv Rd. No Quincy, MAI 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



INVITATIONS & FAVORS 



15% off on Invitations 

E & T CERAMICS & 
PRINTING 

516 SEA STREET -QUINCY 

(617)479-4107 

Ask about our Custom Made Favors A 
Certterpieces for all Occasotis 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography ^ 

679 Hancock Street, Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



BEAUTY & SKINCARE 



ELECTRIC BEACH 

Tanning Center 

77 Parkingway 

Quincy Center 

472-5256 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Woilaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



CPCOlSOn ""« Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Coletti Family Al - Dave - Mark* 

730 HANCCX:K ST.. WOLLASTON 021 70 786-7942 




ALICIA QUINTANO and friend 

(Linda Bosselman photo) 



Stage Company, the Three 
Apples Storytelling 
Festival, Harvard 
University, the Boston 
Children's Museum, First 
Night Boston, and family 
storytelling symposiums 
and concerts in 



Massachusetts and Alaska. 
August brings more 
storytelling concerts to 
Quincy with Derek 
Burrows Aug. 3, Carole 
Duhamel Aug. 10, and the 
Poobley Greegy Puppet 
Theater Aug. 17. 



Ann Marie Kelly 
In 'A Chorus Line' 



Ann Marie Kelly of 
Quincy will play the lead 
role of Val in The 
Company Theatre of 
Norwell's production of "A 
Chorus Line" in August. 

Kelly, a newcomer to 
The Company Theatre, has 
performed in many 
musicals throughout the 
South Shore. She is 



SAVE GAS 

ANDMONEY^ 

SHOP LOCALLY 



currently a first grade 
teacher at St. Mary of the 
Hills School in Milton. 

The show, which opens 
Aug. 6. will be performed 
at The Company Theatre 
Center for the Arts, Rte. 
228 in Norwell, exit 14 off 
Rte. 3. The production will 
run weekend evenings 
through Aug. 28 with an 
Aug. 15 matinee at 3 p.m. 
and a Thursday evening 
show Aug. 26 also 
scheduled. 

Tickets are $15 in 
advance, $17 on the day of 
the show. For more 
infonnation or group rates 
call 871-ARTS (2787). 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



wmm^m 






L„.-, 



tographs witln engagetneait announcements as U 
always has. 

The Sun will also continue to use iu wedding 
antiouncemenLs the names of all members of the 
wedding party including maid ormatron of honor, 
best man, parents, tjridesmaids, ushers, flower 
girls and riugbearers, etc. ^^ ^^. 

We iavHe engaged couple* to sttianit ikS: 
plxMos with iheir atioouncemenls^audl wlten sub- 
mitting their weddtogj^ijoto toinclnde a complete 
listing of the wedding party. 

Black and white photas are preferred. TlieStttt 
can convert mo&t color photos lo black and white 
for pubiicatioo but the phoio loses some clarity in 
Ihe process. 

We suggest that when you have your engage- 
metiit phc^o taken, you request the studio to send a 
copy to The Sun with the reminder that Tlie Sun is 
continning its policy of publishing engagement 
photos. 

The Sun also publishes articles and photos of 
wedding anniversaries beginning with the 25th 
annivei^ary. 

And, as in die past, there is no charge. 



QHS 1943 Class 
Reunion Oct. 23 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 



The Quincy High 
School Class of 1943 will 
hold its 50th anniversary 
reunion Saturday, Oct. 23 
at Lantana in Randolph. 

The addresses and 
phone numbers of the 
following "missing" 
members are sought: 

Harold Armstrong, 
Gordon Avery, John 
Cadger, Donald Cain, 
Robert E. Cameron, Mary 
Austin, Barbara Blake, 
Robert Bosclair, Phyllis 
Bova, James Campbell, 
Charlotte Cavicchi, 
Dolores Cole, Robert 
Coleman, Loretta 
Comeau, Thomas 

Costello, Robert Craigue, 
Catherine Dolan, Jeanne 
Donahue, Courtland 
Dooley. 

Patricia Fennessy, 
Mary Flaherty, Anna 
Fleming, Constance 
Forrest, Lillian Faiella, 
Gloria Gallo, Marie 
Gindorff, George Gordon, 
Joseph Gorman, George 



Grey, Marguerite Morgan 
Grey, Jean Griffin, Martha 
Gustafson, Virginia 
Hansen, Isabel Hayden, 
John Hebert, Alexander 
Hebert, Mary Jane Hebert. 
Bud Jones, Collie 
Kelchris, Donald Kennedy, 
John Kennedy, Betty 
Langton, Russell Leonard, 
Richard Logan, Miriam 
McLeod, Mary MacSwain, 
Gino Marini, Marie 
McSwain, Gino Marini, 
Marie McKenzie, James 
Mollica, Marguerite 
Morgan, John Morrissey, 
Laura Rufo, Betty 
Schwartz, Mary Sarno, 
Betty Seaman, Thomas 
Sanborn, Evelyn 

Wainhouse, Priscilla 

Walsh and Elizabeth 
Woods. 

Friends, family 
members or former 
neighbors knowing of the 
whereabouts of any of the 
above members are 
requested to call Marion 
Forsberg Bell at 698-6451. 




20 Residents On 
NDA Honor Roll 



MR. and MRS. GERALD NADEAU 

(Mclntire's Studio) 

Kimberly Leman Wed 
To Gerald Nadeau 



Twenty Quincy 
residents have been named 
to the honor roll for the 
fourth marking period at 
Notre Dame Academy in 
Hingbam. 

They are: 

Principal's List: Traci 
Anastas, Jennifer 
Antoniazzi, Adrienne 
Fowkes, Linda Hennessy, 
Yasuyo Horiyama, 
Christine McDonnell, 



Mary K. O'Brien. 

First Honors: Heidi 
Graney, Kirsten Hughes, 
Amy Madden, Heather 

Milburn, Tara Murphy, 
Jacqueline O'Shea. 

Second Honors: 
Christine Donadio, Eileen 
Fewer, Noreen Fewer, 
Megan Madden, Erin 
McNeil, Christine Norton, 
Pamela Walsh. 



AARP Weekend Chapter 
To Meet Aug. 1 



The Quincy-Braintree 
Weekend Chapter-AARP 
will meet Sunday, Aug. 
1st at 2 p.m. at the Town 
Brook House 45 Brackett 
St., Quincy. 

Speaker Kathy 

Glenzel's topic will be the 
Shine programs (Serving 



health information needs 
of elders." All over 50 
years of age are invited to 
attend. Cash door prizes 
will be awarded. Please 
bring discarded eyeglasses 
and hearing aids for the 
needy. For info call, Ernie 
Aristide 472-6312. 



Kimberly A. Leman, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul Leman of Quincy, 
was recently married to 
Gerald P. Nadeau. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerald Nadeau of 
Uxbridge. 

The Nuptial Mass was 
celebrated at St. Ignatius 
Church in Chestnut Hill 
and officiated by Rev. 
Daniel Graham. A 
reception followed at the 
World Trade Center in 
Boston. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. 

Jeanne Higgins of 
Hingham served as Maid 



of Honor. 

Patrick Fettucia of 
Uxbridge served as Best 
Man. 

The bride is a 1985 
graduate of Quincy High 
School and a 1989 
graduate of Boston 
College. 

The groom, a 1985 
graduate of Uxbridge High 
School and a 1989 
graduate of Dean Junior 
College, is employed by 
Biogen in Cambridge. 

Following a wedding 
trip to St. Lucia, the 

newlyweds are living in 
Quincy. 



TOM GRAZIANO gets into the spirit of things during a 
recent benefit Hop-A-Thon at Virginia's Day Nursery on 
Quincy Shore Drive. The nursery raised $1,161 for 
Eiaster Seals as children secured pledges from family and 
friends for every hop performed during a three minute 
'hop-n-ing.' 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Kathleen Serra 
Awarded AARP Scholarship 



Carol Steeves Brandeis Graduate 



Kathleen Serra, a 
second year nursing 
student at Quincy College, 
was awarded a scholarship 
by The American 
Association of Retired 
Persons (AARP) at a 
recent luncheon held at 
Quincy Hospital. 

Serra, who completed 
two nursing affiliation at 
the hospital, is also a 
certified home health care 
aid and medical coder. As 
a home health care 
volunteer at Quincy 



Hospital, she developed a 
special relationship with a 
patient who died recently. 
The daughter of the former 
patient contributed 
additional money to the 
AARP award. 

She is a resident of 
Green Harbor. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
H*r9't • chance to earn 
•lira money by building a 
Oulncy Sun horn* dollvory 
rout*. 

Tolephono: 471-3100 






Carol Steeves of 
Quincy recently received a 
bachelor's degree from 
Brandeis University in 
Waltham. 



An English major, she 
is the daughter of Mr and 

Mrs. Eugene Steeves of 
Quincy. 



Melissa Danio On Dean's List 



Debra Panaro AIC Graduate 

Debra J. Panaro of The daughter of Mr. and 



Melissa Danio, a Mass 
Communication-Television 
student at Emerson 
College, was named to the 
Dean's List for the Spring 
academic semester. 



Student's receiving 
Dean's List recognition 
must earn a minimum 3.45 

grade point average for the 
semester. 



Wollaston recently 
graduated cum laude from 
American International 
College in Springfield. 

Alison Caldwell On Dean's List 



Mrs. Kenneth Panaro of 57 
Phillips St., she received a 
B.S. degree in early 
childhood education. 




Michael Costa On Dean's List 

Semester. 

Student's receiving 
Dean's List recognition 
must earn a minimum 3.45 
grade point average for the 
semester. 



Michael F. Costa, a 
writing, literature and 
publishing student at 
Emerson College, was 
named to the Dean's List 
for the Spring Academic 



Alison Caldwell, a 
Mass Communication- 
Film student at Emerson 
College, was named to the 
Dean's List for the Spring 
academic semester. 

Student's receiving 
Dean's List recognition 
must earn a minimum 3.45 



grade point average for the 
semester. 



Kussell Edward's 



Summer Clearance 

25-50% Off Selected Items 

Think of Us for Showers and Weddings! 

OPEN YEAR ROUND 

Open Tues.-Sat. 10-5, Qosed Siindays & Mondays 

3 853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 



@ United Vy^y 
/( brinip out the tml in aH of us 



,, r^>>^obby Sontag 

^Jl^huQV. Palmer 
I 'Melissa Eaton 
C raig Jones & Mark Vanderv,at er 

SPECIALIZING IN WEDDINGS 

AND ALL OCCASIONS 
TilL BEST DJS AND SING INC. 
LMTiK [■A1N1;RS AVMLAHlh 

(617) 748-8471 

IDK ( l.UliS OK PklVAlT i'\krii> 



ARTS & HANDCRAFTS 

12 OLD COLONY AVE., WOLLASTON 

472-7508 

4th Annual 
Customer Appreciation Sale 

July 26-30th 9:30 AM-4:30 PM 

All Product 50% Off 

All Samples 50% Off 

All Books 50% Off 

Come & Save 

Help us make room for new stock 

We now accept most charges 



A full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 

TUES & THURS 

Men's Special $13.00 

WEDNESDAY 
Perm Special 

starting at $42.00 ' N,ii Tipping » o,.r„y wo 

All specials include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 

, M€^us PFHjLMn-ciHELL yiflatfix 



REDKEN 



472-1060 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sua Thursday, July 22, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Paramount Brass Quintet 
At First Parish Sunday 



Girl Scouts Fun Day 



The Paramount Brass 
Quintet will present a 
program of 17 century 
English, French, German 
and Italian composers 
Sunday at 3 p.m. at United 
First Parish Church, 1306 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. 

The concert is part of 
the Presidents Church 
Summer Concert Festival 
being produced by the 
Scarborough Chamber 
Players. 

The Boston-based 
ensemble is composed of 
Jon Dante, trumpet; 
Michael Wentz, trumpet; 
Whitacre Hill, French 
horn; Hans Bohn, 
trombone and Matthew 
Gaunt, tuba. They will 
perform works by Bach, 
Dowland, Handel, 
Famaby, Byrd, Froberger, 
Mouret and Veracini. In 
addition, the quintet will 
speak on the history of 
brass instruments and 
demonstrate antiphonal 
brass style, music 
composed for two or more 
alternating groups, by 
placing members in 
various positions in the 
sanctuary. 

The Paramount Brass 
Quintet is winner of the 
1992 New York Brass 
Conference Quintet 
competition and the 
Alliance Northeast 
Competition for Chamber 




PARAMOUNT BRASS QUINTET will perform Sunday at 
3 p.m. at United First Parish Church, 130« Hancock St., 
Quincy Center. 



Music. The ensemble has 
performed throughout the 
Northeastern United 
States, including Boston 
University, the New 
England Conservatory, the 
Wang Center and the 
Hatch Shell on the 
Esplanade. They have 
given numerous premieres 
of new works for brass 
quintet, performed with the 



WNBC in New York City. 
The ensemble is currently 
quintet in residence of the 
North Shore Conservatory. 
Tickets are $7, $5 for 
children and seniors. Those 
attending may also 
parti cipate in 

Cultureshare, a special 
program offering free 
admission to any adult 
who brings a child. For 



Empire Brass and Atlantic reservations or more 
Brass, and recorded for information call 328-0677. 



Quincy Community Theater 
In 'Great American Circus' July 22 



Quincy Community Thursday, July 22 at 

Theatre will kick off its Marina Bay. 
1 0th anniversary with Shows are scheduled for 

Allan C. Hill's "Great 5:30 and 7:45 p.m. A 

American Circus" limited number of free 



I 



NOW! 

A Complete Laser Video Disc 
Library At Your Fingertips 
If you have a laser disc player 
you can now easily select any 
disc in print by joining our dub. 
Members receive our current 385- 
page catalogue listing over 7,000 titles 
which are dis- 
counted 10 per 
cent. 

Order now and 
receive a jfree copy 
of Laser View 
Magazine (a $2.50 
value) with your 
first laser disc or- 
der. 
Send only $6.25 (includes tax) 

plus $1.95 for shipping to: 

Laser Sights, P.O. Box 3392, 

Boston, Ma. 02101. 

(Allow 2 to 4 weeks for delivery) 




children's passes and 
discounted adult tickets for 
$8 in advance are 
available. 

The Woodward School 
Foundation and The 
Quincy Community 
Theatre are also planning 
to stage a summer comedy 
and music series. Artists 
are being contracted and 
announcements will 
follow. 

The paitnership plans to 
bring back their Christmas 
show originally written for 
and presented by the group 
in 1991 titled "What 
Christmas Means to Me." 
Coincidentally, the theme 
for this year's Quincy 
Christinas Parade is also 
of the same name. 




SHARING A LAUGH during lunch at Girl Scouts Fun Day at St. John's Church are 
Mahriah Salame and Christina Murphy. 




GIRL SCOUT Fun Day was recently held at St. John's Church to acquaint girls to 
scouting. Volunteer Paula Ruozzi instructs girls on how to made first aid kits. From 
left, Danielle Rand, Karen Ruozzi, Tracey Bergonci, Lisa Lam, Rebecca Kelley, 
Meghan McLean, Karen Lo, Courtney Rand, and Jean McEachern. 

(Quincy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 

Stephen Grochowski Co-Curates 
UM ass-Boston Art Exhibition 



Stephen M. Grochowski 
of North Quincy, a former 
Quincy Sun photographer, 
is co-curating the UMass- 
Boston art exhibition, "The 
Shamanic Search for 
Soul," from July 19 to 
August 20. 

Thirty-four regional and 
national artists present 
their art for healing 
themselves and the planet. 
Shamanism is the oldest 
form of spiritual healing on 
the plant, 3000 years old. 
Its basic teaching is that 
existing in harmony with 
everything in nature and 
having spiritual awareness 
is the key to living well. 



Shamanic art often 
contains: a record of 
shamanic journey work, 
magical transformation, 

elements of healing, 
expression of the ineffible, 
search for the soul, 
expression of feelings, or 
expression of mythology. 

There are several 
evening shamanic-related 
events scheduled during 
the exhibition: 

July 30: 7:30 p.m. 
Shamanic poetry reading. 

Aug. 5: 7:30 p.m. 
Evolving your life's 
meaning using Mother 
Earth spirituality. 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



Aug. 10: 6 p.m. a 
dance/drama of shamanic 
healing and self 
empowerment. 

Aug. 10: 7 p.m. A Basic 
Shamanic Mini- Workshop. 

Aug. 17: 7:30 p.m. 
Creating your personal 
myths. 

The Harbor Gallery, 
UMass-Boston, 100 
Morrissey Blvd (Exit 15, 
S.E. Expressway), 
Dorchester, is open 
Mondays through Fridays 
from 12 to 5 p.m. The 
Opening Reception is July 
20, 5 to 8 p.m., there will 
be free admission and 
refreshments. 

For further information 
call (617) 287-7988. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773-4600 



WED & THURS JULY 21 & 22 

Stephen Dea 

"THE CRYING GAME" (PQ-i3) 

An Adult Drama 

EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 23 

Amold Schwazenegger 

"LAST ACTION HERO" (PG-i3) 

Action- Adventure-Fantasy 

FRI & SAT 6:55 & 9:20 

SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



MON & TUES DOLLAR NIGHT 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 



Quincy Housing Authority Retirements 




SEVEN RETIRING EMPLOYEES of the Quincy Housing Authority were recently 
honored at a reception in the QHA's office on Clay St. Executive Director Jake Comer 
left, presents plaques to Rita Daniels (14 years); John Cattaneo (21 years); Santino 
"Sonny" Nicastro (23 years); Henry Pagnano (25 years); Simon J. Tutunjian (21 years)- 
Leo J. Kelly (9 years); and Richard C. "Butch" Inman (23 years). Also retiring, but not 
pictured is Joseph R. LaMantia (23 years). 

Quincy Mental Health Center 
Scheduled To Close Sept. 1 



QUINCY HOUSING AUTHORFFY employee Rita Daniels was given a special citation by 

local officials upon her retirement. Daniels, who worked for the QHA for 14 years, 

receives a State House citation from Rep. Steve Tobin as Peter Kolson, QHA 

maintenance superintendent; and Charles Mclntyre, her Godson and longtime family 

friend, look on. ,r\ ■ c l t ^ ^ 

(Qmncy Sun photos by Tom Gorman) 



11 Residents On BU Dean's List 



The Quincy Mental 
Health Center is scheduled 
to close Sept. 1. 

Since 1984, the center 
has provided services to 
uninsured mentally ill 
residents of the South 
Shore, including inpatient 
and day hospital, as well 
as case management. 

The Department of 
Mental Health is facing 
major budget cuts. The 
Metro South Area of DMH 
is currently being asked to 
sustain $1 million of the 
$7 million cut to the entire 
department. 

Clifford Robinson, the 
Area Director, has 



proposed a plan to the 
commissioner for her 
consideration and approval 
by July 20. The plan 
includes closure of the 
Quincy Mental Health 
Center Inpatient Unit and 
Day Hospital as of Sept. 1. 
This would result in 
people in need of services 
being sent to Medfield 
State Hospital. 

A health center 
statement said: "As 
taxpayers, we recognize 
the need for cost-cutting 
measures in these difficult 
economic times. However, 

•Care at QMHC is cost- 



effective care because it is 

high quality care. 

Consumers do not require 

services for as long or as 

frequently 

because they get the right 

care right away. 

•Budget cuts, if 
necessary, should be 
equitable. Why should the 
Metro South Area take 
approximately 14% of a 
state-wide $7 million 
proposed cut when it 
currently only represents 
approximately *% of the 
DMH's budget? There 
should be equality among 
all of the DMH areas. 



Eleven Quincy residents 
have been named to the 
dean's list at Boston 
University for the spring 
semester. 

They are: Julie A. 
Flaherty, Quang X. Huynh, 
Jaymin P. Patel, 
Antoinetta L. Ruscio, Eva 



M. Shea, Li J. Tan, Kin M. Chuong. H. Diep, James Y. 
Yee, Ronald M. Boudreau, Lou, Chung- Wai B. Ng. 



Cheryl's Hair Solution 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



M«n& Women $10 
Children $7 

6 yrs. & under $S 



Spfirofs $45 & up 
Highlights $35 4 up 
Foclol Waxing $S 



Tues. & Fri. 10-6, Wed. & Thurs 10-8, Sat. 9-4 

Walk-ins or appointments 

1446 Hancock Street, Quincy Ctr. 

472-1344 

(at same location as Gino's Barber Shop) 



NOW OPEN 



Brian Barrett Wins 
$15,000 Shaw's Scholarship 



Brian S. Barrett of 
Quincy is the winner of 
Shaw's Supermarkets 
$15,000 grand prize "Cash 
For College" scholarship. 

Barrett, who is 22, will 
attend the University of 
Tampa in Florida this fall 
as a junior. He also won a 



$1,000 scholarship in a 
local drawing at Shaw's 
Supermarkets, in Quincy. 
He is a 1989 graduate of 
North Quincy High School. 
Shaw's "Cash For 
College" scholarship 
giveaway awarded 80 
college-bound New 
Enelanders with $1,000 



scholarships last month. 
Each local winner was 
then eligible for the grand 
prize $15,000 scholarship, 
drawn randomly at Shaw's 
Corporate offices. The 
awards ceremony was held 
at the Quincy Shaw's 
where Barrett won his 
scholarship. 




/?=" 



BRENNAN'S 

fine tobacco • cigarettes • lottery 

Name Brand Cigarettes 

Only $2.21 per pack + tax 

Many Brands as low as 

$ 1 .45 per pack + tax 



In Store Lottery Raffle 

stop In for details 
No Purchase Necessary 




RIVER 



NEIGHBORHOOD 
EATERY 



I 



Hours: Mon-Sat 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sun 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Two convenient locations 

1 442 Hancock St 1 255 River St 

Quincy Square Cleory Square 

617-786-8610 Quincy Square 

61 7-36 1 - 1 444 Cleary Square, Hyde Parl< 






Selections from our Menu 
Garden Greens 

* Ceasar's Salad * Grilled Chicken Salad 

Burgers & Sandwiches 
10 oz. Basic Burger * Prime Rib Sandwich 

Little Italy 

* Pizza * Sauteed Chicken Broccoli & Ziti 

Appetizers 
' Ultimate Nachos • Buffalo Wings 

Fried Chicken Wings • Fried Zuccini 

Charbroiled Specialties 
► Steak Tips • Baby Back Ribs 

* Pork Chops • Roast Prime Rib of Beef 

The Daily Catch 
Native Broiled Schrod • Broiled Scallops 
Fish & Chips • Fried Seafood Platter 

^ D I 



(617) 479^2400 

520 Washington Street, Quincy 



P«fe 10 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 




CROWDS STROLL DOWN the middle of Hancock St. during the annual Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival sponsored by the Quincy Center Business and Professional 
Association. Thousands attended the three-day event. 



THAT LOOKS GOOD--Jessica Breen and Michelle Acciavatti check merchandise on 
sale at the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival. 



Sidewalk Festival Draws Crowds, Boosts Sales 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

and 
JENNIFER WEITZMAN 

The 23rd annual Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival 
was one of the most 
successful ever, drawing 
record crowds and 
providing a healthy boost 
to participating businesses 
and merchants. 

That was the general 
consensus of local 
merchants surveyed by 
The Quincy Sun. The event 
was sponsored by the 
Quincy Center Business 
and Professional 

Association. 
Typical comments: 

Eileen Cohen, 

executive director of the 
QCBPA said: "It was a 
great success. The crowds 
were the biggest I can 
remember— thousands of 
people enjoying the music 
and many activities and 
strolling down Hancock St. 
shopping for buys. 

"The up-and-down 
street comments I heard 
were that sales figures 
were up over last year 
even though last year's 
festival was a four-day 
event and this year's was 
three days." 

Area merchants had the 
following comments: 

Debbie Ackerman, 
Buck-A-Book: "It was very 
good for two reasons: first, 
we made some money, 
and second, about half the 
people I spoke to didn't 
even know we were here 
(at President's Place; the 
store first opened last 
August, after the 1992 
Sidewalk Festival). The 
weather was great, and it 
went very, very well." 

Bernie Reisberg, 
Bemie's Formal Shop: "It 
was one of the better 
years, if not the best year, 
that we 've had. There were 



a lot of people out there, 
and the weather was with 
us. I was pleased with the 
results, and 1 commend the 
committee that worked on 
it." 

Caryn Smith, Caryn's 
Corner: "Friday was the 
best day I've had in six 
and a half years of 
business, topping 
Christmas Eve of last year. 
It was also the first year 
we've done better on 
Friday than on Thursday. 
There was a constant flow 
of people, and a minimum 
of five people under the 
tent at all times." 

Donald Russell, 

Woolworth's: "We did fair. 
It was about the same as 
the year before as far as 
business was concerned." 

Kathy Missell, Infinity 
Books: "It was terrific, 
probably the best sidewalk 
sale I've ever had. Crowds 
were greater over the three 
days as opposed, 
traditionally, to just 
Thursday." 

Paul Sturman, Frantic 
Framers: "I thought this 
was one of the better ones 
in the last four or five 
years. I got rid of a lot of 
stuff" 

Charles Ryder, 
Ryder's of Quincy: "We 
did spectacularly. It was 
very good, better than it's 
been in the last five years, 
anyway. I'd like to thank 
the QCBPA Promotions 
Committee for the work 
they did in filling the 
streets with events. There 
were good crowds all three 
days because of the events 
they scheduled." 

Dave Chapman, 
Parade of Shoes: "Sales 
were really good. I'd say 
they were better than last 
year's Sidewalk Festival." 

Michael Hemeon, 



New England Comics: 
"We did pretty well for our 
first sidewalk sale (The 
store opened in Quincy 
Square 10 years ago). It 
fell right in line with our 
sales pitch for the summer 
— blowing out our back 
issue stock. 

Carol Nelsc.i, 

Children's Orchard: "It was 
great. Our store did 
wonderful. I saw many of 
our regular customers and 
met some brand new ones 
that didn't even know I had 
a store." 

"I brought out the 
summer clearance 
merchandise and hats and 
we had to keep 
replenishing the shelves. 
We did especially great 
with baby hats. 

Chuck Hamilton, 
McDonald's manager: "All 
three days brought 
excellent weather and the 
turnout was especially 
good. The sidewalk sale 
brought us good publicity 
and that's why we did it." 

Richard Carriger, 
Pilgrim Restaurant: "I 
thought it was a good sale. 
The street traffic was extra 
fiill with happy customers. 
People kept commenting 
on how they thought the 
sale was terrific. It makes 
a difference with our sales. 
They more we can keep 
them around, the more 
money they spend. 

"It was a well put 
together day. The 
promotions committee did 
an especially nice job." 

Bob Colman, Colman's 
Sporting Goods: "It was a 
good sale and we had a 
great break with the 
weather. There was 
definitely a younger crowd 
than prior years. The 
entertainment was geared 
towards them. 



QCBPA Thanks Festival Sponsors 



The Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association through 
Executive Director Eileen 
Cohen thanks the 
following for sponsoring 
activities during the 
annual Sidewalk Festival: 

Amity Insurance, 
Anodyne Medical 
Services, Atty. Richard P. 
Bany, BayBaiDk, Bany's In 
The Square, Bernie's 



Formal Shop, Boston Five 
Cents Savings Bank, 
Burgin, Plainer Insurance, 
Caryn's Comer, Colonial 
1600 Restaurant, Creative 
Fairs, Dunkin Donuts, 
Faxon Trust, Finian's 
Restaur :int. Fleet Bank, 
Frantic Framers, Hancock 
Court Association, Infinity 
Books, Johnson Motor 
Parts, Medical Associates, 
Meineke Nbiffler, Messina 



Enterprises, Multi-Cultural 
Association, Murphy 
Kligman & Company, 
Presidents Place 

Associates, Protestant 
Social Service Bureau, the 
Quincy Sons of Italy, 
Quincy 2000 Corporation, 
Sherman Realty, South 
Shore Bank, Sweeney 
Funeral Home, U.S. Navjil 
Shipbuilding Museum and 
F.W. 




MONTY PYTHON, a ball python, is checked out by youngsters at the Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival. Barbara Prince of the New England Wildlife Center in Hingham 
does the holding honors as she fields questions from the audience. 




ARABIAN DANCE IS performed by Tarleton Reynolds and "Juggling John" as part 
of the Mime Circus at the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival. 




LPN BONNIE KOWALSKI (left) checks the blood pressure of Joan Medige at the 
Quincy Visithig Nurses Association booth clinic dorinc the Quhicy Center Sidewalk 
FestiTaL 

(Quincy Sm Photos by Tom Gorman) 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quincy Sun Page II 




A BIRD SUDDENLY appears from a glass window to the amazement of Nathan 
Soucier who assisted magician Stephen Brenner during the Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival. 

It Was Real Blues For Blues Band 



A SCALE MODEL of the U.S. Naval Shipbuilding Museum to be built at the Quincy 
Shipyard is looked over by volunteers Robert Gohl and Frank Cormier at the Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival. 



One minor 

disappointment at last 
week's Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival was the 
no-show of The 
Yardrockers, a blues band 
sponsored by Joe's Pub 
(a.k.a. The Yard Rock 
Cafe). 

The band had been 
scheduled to play at the 
festival Thursday night. 

Joe Hajjar Jr., son of 
pub owner Joe Hajjar Sr., 
said Monday that the 
band's bass player. Cole 
Grinnell, was injured in a 
car accident the previous 
Monday on the Fore River 
Bridge. 

Hajjar said Grinnell 
initially refused medical 
treatment because he did 



not believe he was injured, 
but subsequently began to 
experience pain from the 
accident. 

"He thought he was 
okay (at first)," said 
Hajjar, "but then he 
checked himself into the 
hospital a couple of days 
later. It was really last 
minute." 

Hajjar added that 
because of these unforseen 
circumstances, there was 
no time for the band to 
find a substitute bass 
player or for the pub to 
hire a replacement band. 

Joe Hajjar Sr. said 
Tuesday that doctors 
believed Grinnell had 
suffered a "hairline 
fracture" in one of his 



arms. 

"He lost all feeling in 
his hand and arm," said 
Hajjar, who agreed there 
was no time to get anyone 
to take Grinnell 's place. 
"It was very disappointing 
for all parties." 

Hajjar said he was 
particularly disappointed 
about the no-show because 
he thought this year's 
festival was a tremendous 
success, and he 
commended the Quincy 
Center Business and 
Professional Association 
Promotions Committee for 
organizing the event. 

"They did a great job," 
he said. "They deserve all 
the accolades in the 
world." 




QUINCY ALUMNI BAND was among the featured musical acts at Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Festival. 




RYAN CULLIVAN-MARSTON, 3 1/2, tries out the giant slide during the Quincy 
Center Sidewalk Festival. 



MASTERS OF SELF DEFENSE put on demonstration at Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Festival. 




WORKING THE GRILL during the Quincy Center Sidewalk Festival are Rick 
Carrigcr and Steve Harding. 



GREEK DANCERS pcfform at Qaiacy Center Sidewalk FcrttvaL 



J 



Page 12 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 



Obituaries 



Joseph F. lacobucci, 70 

Owned Adams Service Station; 
Pilot For Many Years 



Daniel W. Leavitt, 83 

Teacher For 25 Years 



A funeral Mass for 
Joseph F. lacobucci, 70, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
July 16 in St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. lacobucci died July 
12 at home. 

The owner of the 
Adams Service Station on 
Independence Ave. since 
1953, he was still working 
as an automobile 
mechanic before his death. 

A trained pilot, he 
enjoyed soaring through 
the skies in his rebuilt 
1933 Fairchild 22. He 
bought the fuselage in the 
1960s, after the wings has 
been crushed in a hangar 
collapse, and spent nine 
years rebuilding the two- 
seat, open cockpit, single- 
wing plane. 

He obtained the basic 
wing sections in Missouri 
and made the wings and 
body from mahogany. He 
flew the plane for the first 
time in 1975. He also flew 
a Fairchild 24, a closed- 
cabin, single-wing plane, 
for 30 years. 

His first plane was a 65- 
horsepower Aeronca 
Champion and he kept a 
Waco UPF 7, a two-place 
biplane, in Hanover. 



He earned an air and 
power license, allowing 
him to repair planes and 
was an Ajmy Air Corps 
bomber mechanic for three 
years during World War 11. 

A charter member of 
the Plymouth Airclub and 
the Experimental Aircraft 
Association, he was a 
member of the Quiet 
Birdmen at the Boston 
Hangar, the New England 
Aeroclub and the National 
Waco Club. 

He was bom and lived 
all of his Ufe in Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Phyllis (Johnson) 
lacobucci; two sons, 
Robert lacobucci of 
Quincy and Wayne Blanks 
of Brockton; three 
daughters, Verona Devoe 
and Kathleen Kerr, both of 
Braintree, and Madalin 
Williams of Brockton; a 
brother and sister, Michael 
lacobucci of Roslindale 
and Mary Folino of 
Florida; six grandchildren, 
and two great- 
grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Lydon Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 



A committal service for 
Daniel W. Leavitt, 83, of 
Oak Bluffs, a former 
science and physical 
education teacher and 
football coach at Quincy 
Point Junior High School, 
will be held today 
(Thursday) at 11 a.m. in 
St. Mary's Cemetery, New 
Bedford. 

Mr. Leavitt died 
Tuesday at New England 
Medical Center in Boston 
after a brief illness. 

He taught for 25 years 
Lintil his retirement in 
1970. 



Born in Randolph, he 
also lived in Whitman 
before moving to Oak 
Bluffs 23 years ago. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Constance A. 
(Lowney) Leavitt; a 
daughter, Mary Elizabeth 
Thompson of Georgia; and 
two grandchildren. 

A memorial service will 
be held at a later date. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Hurley 
Funeral Home, Randolph. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



Elizabeth MacPherson, 96 

Oldest Member Of Fort Square Church 



Frederick J. Swanton, 53 

Sheet Metal Worker; Involved In Foster Care 

Association for 



Henrietta Stark, 75 

husband, John Stark; two 
sons, Dr. James C. Stark ot 

Quincy, a chemistry 
professor at Eastern 
Nazarene College, and 
John H. Stark of New 
York, and six 

grandchildren. 

Burial was private. 



A funeral Mass for 
Henrietta (Jones) Stark, 
75, of Quincy, was 
celebrated July 18 in 
WoUaston Church of the 
Nazarene. 

Mrs. Stark died .Tuly 14 
at the Robbin House 
Nursing Home. 

Born in Patchogue, 
N.Y., she lived on Long 
Island before moving to 
Massachusetts 15 years 
ago. 

She was a member of 
WoUaston Church of the 
Nazarene. 

She is survived by her 



A funeral Mass for 
Frederick J. Swanton, 53, 
of Quincy, was celebrated 
Tuesday in Out Lady of 
Good Counsel Church. 

Mr. Swanton died July 
15 at Quincy Hospital. 

He was a sheet metal 
worker for Local 17. 

He and his wife, 
Elizabeth (Sullivan) 
Swanton, began taking in 
foster children nine years 
ago and helping them find 
permanent homes. The 
couple took in many 
children, some staying for 
a couple of days and 
others for a couple of 
years. 

He also spent time 
counseling children, 
arranging visits with 
siblings and trying to find 
permanent homes for their 
children. The Swantons 
became involved in the 



A funeral Mass for 
Elizabeth (MacDonald) 
MacPherson, 96, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in Fort Square 
United Presbyterian 
Church. 

Mrs. MacPherson died 
July 15 at Quincy Hospital. 

A 90-year resident of 
Quincy, she was a charter 
member of the Friendship 
Circle of Fort Square 
Presbyterian Church and 
the oldest member of the 
church. She was a member 
of the choir and the 
Women's Mission Society. 

She taught Sunday 
School for many years and 
was a hostess for many 
visiting missionaries. 



John J. Moylan Jr., 72 

Survived Pearl Harbor Attack; 
Ironworker For 20 Years 



ion 
Professional Foster Care. 

Born in Boston, he 
lived in Milton before 
moving to Quincy 33 years 
ago. 

He was a 1957 graduate 
of Quincy Trade School. 

He was a member of 
the Merry mount J ^j^,, Moylan Jr., 72, of 

Association and was very q^^^ ^^3 celebrated 
active wuh the Our Lady j„ j^ i„ sacred Heart 
of Good Counsel Pansh. 

He is also survived by 
four sons, John Swanton of 
Chicago and Brian 
Swanton, Christopher 
Swanton and David 



Her favorite pastime 
was letter writing. 

Wife of the late 
Alexander J. MacPherson, 
she is survived by a son, 
James K. MacPherson of 
Braintree ; two 

grandchildren, two great- 
grandchildren and several 
nieces and nephews. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to Fort Square United 
Presbyterian Church, 
Missionary Fund, 16 
Pleasant St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



A funeral Mass for John 



Swanton, all of Quincy; 
six daughters, Maureen 
Donahue of Plymouth and 



Church. 

Mr. Moylan died July 
13 at South Shore Hospital 
in Weymouth. 

An ironworker for 20 
years, he worked for 
several companies before 
retiring in 1983. 

An Army veteran of 



Susan Swanton, Marjorie world War II, he was 

Swanton, Lorraine 

Swanton, Joanne Brown 

and Kathleen Swanton, all 

of Quincy; four brothers, 

William Swanton and 



foster program after their- Donald Swanton, both of Japan. 



stationed at Pearl Harbor 
when the Japanese 
attacked on Dec. 7, 1941. 
The next day, the United 
States declared war on 



Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to WoUaston Church of the 
Nazarene, 37 East Elm 
Ave., Quincy, MA 02170. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 

Recently we received « note from « 
reader suggesting that far too mwiy 
Boards, Councils, Committees and 
even some Individuals have an un- 
canny way of delaying Indeflnltely or 
avoiding completely making contro- 
versial declslons...Alsoenclosed was 
a dipping from an old publication 
which the reader felt was still ^>pr»- 
prlate today. I couldn't agree more...TO AVOID MAKING DECISIONS 

1 . Profess not to have THE answer. That leU you out of having any 
answer. 

2. Say that we must not mo ve too rapidly. This avoids tfw necessity of 
getting started. 

3. For every proposal, set up any opposite and conclude that the 
middle ground (no motion whatsoever) represents the wisest course 
of action. 

4. Say that tl>e problem can't be separated from other problems. 
Therefore, It can't be solved until all other problems have been solved. 

5. Ask what Is meant by the question. By the time It Is clarified It will 
be time to go home. 

6. Appoint a committee. 

7. Walt untii an expert can be consulted. 

8. State In conclusion that you have darlfled your thinking. This 
completely obscures the fact that nothing ftas been done. 

9. Point out how the deepest minds have struggled with the same 
problem. This Implies that It gives you credit even to have thought of 
It. 

10. In dosing, thank the problem. It has stimulated the discussion, 
contributed to our growth, opened up new vistas, shown the way, 
cfMllenged our Inventiveness. 

Why can't we make timely decisions on Important matters? I don't 
profess to have THE answer. ..We may need to consult an expert! 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Sen/ices Rendered to Any Distance 



oldest daughter got 
married and one of their 
sons went away to school. 

He was a member of 
the Pilgrim Center in 
Braintree, which helps 
teen-age boys in trouble 
with the law. 

Mr. Swanton was also a 
member of the Foster 
Parents Support Group 
Coastal Office in Braintree 
and the Massachusetts 

Yvone Bourke, 83 

A funeral Mass for ^- Bourke, she is survived 



Holbrook, John Swanton of 
Maine and Kenneth 
Swanton of Milton; a 
sister, Bette Temple of 
California; and seven 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



He was a member of 
the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars in Quincy, the 
Disabled American 
Veterans and the Pearl 
Harbor Survivors 
Association. 

Born in Westboro, he 
lived in Worcester before 
moving to Quincy 1 8 years 
ago. 

He was a member of 



the Kmghts of Columbus. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Virginia M. (Cahill) 
Moylan; two stepsons, 
Robert A. Moran of 
Rockland and David P. 
Moran of Bridge water; five 
brothers, Robert Moylan, 
Donald Moylan, Bernard 
Moylan, and David 
Moylan, all of Worcester, 
and Richard Moylan of 
Auburn; five sisters, Mary 
Tangney, Phyllis White 
and Beverly Ritchie, all of 
Worcester, Joan Zawalick 
of Duxbury and Deborah 
Moylan of East Dennis; 
and four grandchildren. 

Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 333 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Alzheimer's Disease 
Support Group at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., Quincy, MA 02170. 



Yvone (Boheau) Bourke, 
83, of Quincy, was 
celebrated July 16 in Most 
Blessed Sacrament 
Church. 

Mrs. Bourke died July 
13 at Quincy Hospital. 

Born in Montreal, 
Canada, she lived most of 
her fife in Quincy. 

Wife of the late Robert 



by a son. Real Bourke of 
Hanover; two daughters, 
Louise Gannon of 
Weymouth and Andree 
Caldwell of Quincy; six 
grandchildren, and seven 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 



Leo V. Powers, 96 

Partner In Leather Firm 



A funeral Mass for Leo 
V. Powers, 96, of Quincy, 
was celebrated July 16 in 
St. Ann's Church. 

Mr. Powers died July 12 
at Crestview Nursing 
Home. 

A partner in the leather 
firm, O'Brien and Powers 
Co., he had also been 
involved in sales for the 



■CHR-STIAN DIOR • SOPHIA LORt.'; 3 JOAN COLLINS • VUASSiET C PIERRE CARCIN 






Fashion 
ewear 

SAVE 

*35 



1361-A Hancock St., Quincy Sq. Si 
773-3505 • 773-4174 ^ 

"aT^ $499 • 

Complete 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 

1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES _ 

m4i<;ton • AVANTr.ARnF • n<;r4Rnei.apEiuT/( • WESSAIMT .iiip^fcjT 



company. 

He was an Army 
veteran of World War II. 

Born in Framingham, 
he lived in Quincy for 83 
years. 

He was a member of 
the St. Vincent de Paul 
Society and the Holy 
Name Society at Our Lady 
of Good Counsel Church, 
Merrymount. 

Husband of the late 
Eleanor B. (Smith) 
Powers, he is survived by 
two sons, Leo A. Powers of 
Seattle and Thomas A. 
Powers of Plymouth; a 
sister, Eleanor B. Williams 
of Scituate; 17 
grandchildren and eight 
great-grandchildren. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Denzil W. Ward, 83 

Taught In Public, Private Schools; 
Former Boy Scout Counselor 



Religion 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 13 

Central Student Senate 



A private graveside 
service for Denzil W. 
Ward, 83, of Quincy, was 
conducted by Capt. James 
LaBossiere of the 
Salvation Army July 16 in 
Blue Hill Cemetery, 
Braintree. 

Mr. Ward died July 15 
at Quincy Hospital. 

An Eagle Scout and 
merit badge counselor for 
the Boy Scouts, he taught 
in public and private 
schools. 

Born in Canada, he 
lived in Quincy for 50 
years. 

He is survived by a 
daughter, Marilyn M. 



Nelson of Seabrook, Md.; 
two brothers, the Rev. 
Lloyd H. Ward of Fort 
Meyers, Fla., and Donald 
H. Ward of Dundas, 
Ontario; two sisters, 
Audrey M. Ward of 
Wollaston and Myrtle E. 
Ramon of Stoney Creek, 
Ontario; a grandson and 
many other relatives. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock vSt. 

Donations may be made 
to the Quincy Salvation 
Army, 6 Baxter St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



Bethany Congregational Completes Active Year 



Catherine C. Ryan, 86 

Clerk For Insurance Co., 
Quincy Assessors Office 



Guest minister at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Quincy Center at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
will be Rev. Linda 
Roberts. 

Her sermon topic will 
be "Tales of Buried 
Treasure." Scripture reader 
will be Kevin Wallace. 
Guest soloist will be 
Richard Faust, tenor, with 
Gregory Flynn, organist. 

Greeting the worshipers 
will be Gloria Morgan and 
Anne Keeler. Hostess for 
the Fellowship Hour which 
is held at after the worship 
service will be Sylvia 
Hofsepian. 

Child care is provided 
for infants and toddlers. 
Bethany Church is 



handicapped accessible 
via a ramp on the Spear 
St. side. 

The fourth in the series 
of Mid-Week Concerts 
Wednesday, July 28 at 
12:15 to 12:45 p.m. will 
feature Gregory Flynn, 
Bethany Church choir 
director and organist. He 
will play a variety of 
works arranged for the 
church's four manual pipe 
organ. A luncheon is 
available following the 
concert. 

The concerts are being 
presented during July and 
August through the 
collaboration of the Friend 
of Bethany, Joanne 
French, coordinator and 
Scarborough Productions, 
Virginia Sindelar. 



A funeral Mass for 
Catherine C. Ryan, 86, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
July 16 in St. Ann's 
Church. 

Miss Ryan died at 
home July 1 1 after a brief 
illness. 

A clerk for Boston 
Mutual Insurance Co. for 
45 years, she retired in 
1972 and subsequently 
worked part-time as a 
clerk in the Quincy 
assessors office. 

She was the sister of 
the late Dennis F. Ryan, 
clerk of Quincy District 
Court for 30 years. 

She was a member of 
the Quincy Democratic 
Committee. 

She was a 

communicant at St. Ann's 
Church in Wollaston. 

Bom in Boston, she was 
raised and educated in 
South Boston before 
moving to Quincy, where 
she lived for 65 years. 

She was a graduate of 



oi. Peter and Paul High 
School in South Boston 
and Boston Clerical. 

She is survived by a 
sister, Irene Southward of 
Swampscott; seven 
nephews and nieces, 
Dennis M. Ryan, 
Christopher P. Ryan and 
John V. Ryan Jr., all of 
Hingham, Kevin G. Ryan 
of Gaithersburg, Md., 
William G. Ryan of 
Bridgewater, Patricia Ann 
Richard of Pryor, Okla., 
and Mary L. Adams of 
Rialto, Calif.; and 18 
grandnephews and 
grandnieces. She was the 
sister of the late John V. 
Ryan. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 

Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to St. Ann's Church, 757 
Hancock St., Quincy, MA 
02170. 



Quincy Point Congregational 



The Rev. Carol Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will preach 
on "Recognizing The 
Kingdom Of Heaven" at 
the 10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

The Rev. Fred Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will serve as 
liturgist. Music will be by 
Dr. Herman Weiss, 



organist. Child care is 
provided during the 
service. 

Following the service, 
refreshments will be 
prepared and served by 
members of the Mission 
Board. 

For more information 
about church services and 
activities, call the church 
office at 773-6424, 
Monday through Thursday, 
8 a.m. to noon. 



Glad Tidings Church 
Family Night Wednesdays 



Glad Tidings Church 
will hold a "Family-Style 
Community Night" each 
Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. 
throughout the summer at 



Pageant Field, Quincy. 

Residents are invited to 
bring food and a grill, play 
sports and games and hear 
live music groups. 



United Methodist 



Kazar Bogosian, 86 

Former Textile Salesman 



A private funeral 
service for Kazar "Paul" 
Bogosian, 86, of Quincy, 
was held July 17 in the 
Holy Trinity Armenian 
Church, Cambridge. 

Mr. Bogosian died July 
14 at Quincy Hospital after 
a long illness. 

An Army veteran of 
World War II, he was a 
salesman for several 
textile companies. 

Born in Boston, he 
lived in Quincy since 
1945. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Phyllis M. (Terhune) 
Bogosian; a brother and 



sister, Arman Bogosian 
and Marion Bogosian, both 
of Wollaston, and several 
cousins. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Auburn Cemetery, 
Cambridge. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Lydon Funeral 
Home, 644 Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to Pond Meadow Nursing 
Home, 188 Summer St., 
Weymouth; Fenno House, 
540 Hancock St., Quincy, 
MA 02170; or Holy Trinity 
Armenian Church, 145 
Brattle St., Cambridge, 
MA 02138. 



Lay speaker Kathleen 
Aston will preach on 
"Spiritual Healing" at the 
10 a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Quincy 
Community United 
lethodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Scripture reader will be 
Paul DelGieco. Music will 
be led by Scott Walker, 



choir director. Greeters 
will be Mildred McHugh 
and Margaret McMuUen. 
Ushers will be Gary and 
Joanne Smith. 

Hostesses at the 
fellowship hour in Susanna 
Wesley Hall will be 
Virginia Hawes, Olga 
Hawkins, Anne Kjellander 
and Margery Rund. 



The Student Senate at 
Central Middle School 
recently completed an 
active and productive year. 

Leaders were Mayor 
Bridget Shaughnessy, 
Deputy Mayor Maureen 
Sullivan, Secretary Tina 
Katsarikas and Treasurer 
Michael Greene. 

Members of the Senate 
included: sixth graders, 
seventh graders and eighth 
graders representing their 
divisions. They were: 
Courtney Lomond, Sarah 
Kiley, Jennifer Kenneally, 
Shirley Wu, Nicole 
Weiler, Vincent Chiu, 
Lisa Schwartz, Nyran 
Nolido, Michael Kane, 
John Barron, Timothy 
Lewis, Jared Downey, 
Matthew Kazolias, 
Andrew Bisconte, 
Marybeth Feeney, Kelly 
Magnuson, Christopher 
Moody, Jamie Christo, 
Meaghan Powers, Jinkee 
Pacifico, John Tormey, 
Julie Strout and Outtara 
Ly. 

The last activity 
culminated with breakfast 
served by Principal Louis 
DiMartinis, Carter Caudle 
and Mary Catherine 
lannoni. Short order chefs 
made and served the 
menu. 

Graduation ceremonies 

were conducted for the 

first time in many years. 

The evening began with a 

spaghetti dinner made and 

served by head chef 

Kenneth Panaro and 

assisted by Marylou 

Panaro. One hundred 

seventy nine students were 

seated at tables, decorated 

with balloons and 

streamers. Assistants were: 

William McWeeny, 

Charles Caldwell, Marcia 

Filiurin, Phyllis Delaney, 

Robert Saunders, Brian 

Flaherty, Patricia Drew, 



feg«^ 



INSURANCE AGENCY.INC 

"B« Sura Now - Not Sorry Later" 

OUR NEW LOCATION IS: 
62 DERBY STREET. HINGHAM, MA 

PO BOX 522 ACCORD STATION 02018-0522 

Rear BIdg., behind SHEARSON & LEHMAN 

(OFF RTE 3. EXIT 15 NEXT TO HINGHAM PLAZA* 

TEL: (617)740-4070 
COME BY AND VISIT OUR NEW OFFICE 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Dr. W. Arthur Rice of 
the Highland 

Congregational Church 
will be guest speaker at 
the 9:30 a.m. worship 
service Sunday at Houghs 
Neck Congregational 
Church, 310 Manet Ave. 

Serving for the 
Diaconate will be Dr. 
Carol Lee Griffin and 
Joseph Carr, Junior 
Deacon. Lois Bassett and 
Gayle MacKay will sing 
under the direction of 



organist Arden Schoneld. 
Greeter will be Ron 
Lemieux. 

Following the service 
all are invited to a coffee 
hour in the Conference 
Room hosted by Gayle 
MacKay 

The church is collecting 
non-perishable food and 
paper products for the 
PSSB and Father Bill's 
Place each Sunday. The 
church is air conditioned 
and handicapped 

accessible. 



Church of^ 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St, Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4.00 & 7:00 pm 

Sunday: 7 am, 

9 am, 1 1 am, 

12:30 and 5:30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 

\l^Rectoiy-21 Gay St. 773-1021^ 




Jean Healy, Linda Lew- 
Hanson, Camille 
Courtney, Marylou 
Petrelli, Virginia 
McDermott, Margaret 
Spencer, Alice Cox and 
Mary Catherine lannoni. 

Students then adjourned 
to the gym where parents 
were seated. A chorus sang 
two selections and the 
officers showed slides of 
all the activities at 
Central. Each student was 
called to the platform to 
receive a certificate in 
recognition of three years 
at Central and awards that 
they earned as they had 
participated in academic, 
musical, sports and service 
programs. 

Special awards were 
given to Bridget 
Shaughnessy and James 
Melchin granted by the 
Skoler Family. The 
American Legion awards 
were to Maureen Sullivan 
and Jon Mahoney. The 
Principal's awards were 
given to Sarah Downey, 
Erin Flaherty, Amanda 
Hunter, Tina Katsarikas, 
Kosana Poon, Felicia 
Tam. The Haddad 
memorial Award for 
excellence in science was 
presented to Jinkee 
Pacifico. 

The Choral trophy went 
to Christopher Moody and 
the Band Trophy went to 
Warren Eyering. For 
completing three years 
with an all "A" record 
special recognition was 
awarded to Vivian Chan, 
Jill Fishman, Kosanna 
Poon, Felicia Tam and 
Jenny Zhen. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here'* e chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



SAINT JOSEPH SCHOOL 

QUINCY 

22 Pray St. 

Our curriculum offers something that 
most others don't...THE ANSWER 




EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION 

St. Joseph School is now accepting regis- 
trations for PRE-KINDERGARTEN 
through GRADE 8. For more informa- 
tion or registration forms, please call the 
school at 773-8080. After school care 
available. 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 22. 1993 



Sun Sports 



Legion Baseball 



Morrisette Closing In 
On Zone 6 Crown 



Joanna Rugnetta 

UMass-Boston 

Basketball Co-Captain 



The defending 

champion Morrisette 
Legion baseball team 
closed in on another Zone 
6 championship by 
defeating Quincy, 10-1, 
last Friday to improve its 
record to 11-2-2. 

Morrisette, whicn 
played Milton Tuesday, 
will host Randolph tonight 
(Thursday) at 8:30 at 
Adams Field and will wind 
up the regular season 
Friday night at 8:30 
against West Roxbury at 
Adams. West Roxbury 
banded Morrisette one of 
its two losses. Morrisette 
needs one win in the final 
three games to clinch the 
Zone 6 title. The team is 
10-0 at Adams Field and 
the final three games are 
at Adams. 

Mike Patch improved to 
3-1 as he held Quincy to 
three hits, struck out five 
and did not walk a batter. 
Pat Bryan pitched the 
seventh and struck out two 
in a perfect inning. 

Quincy scored its run in 
the first when George 
Wirtz had an infield hit 
and scored on Mark 
Karlson's double to right. 

A single by Karlson was 
the only other hit for 
Quincy. 

Danny Burke was the 



starter and loser for 
Quincy. 

Morrisette had 10 hits, 
five for extra bases. It 
scored two runs in the 
first,one in the second, two 
in the third and fourth and 
three in the sixth. 

Dave Reinhart drove in 
three runs with a triple and 
single and Brian Hayes 
went 3-for-3 with a double 
and a RBI. Robbie Kane 
reached base four times on 
an infield fit, two walks 
and an error. He stole two 
bases including home and 
scored three runs. 

Patch helped himself as 
he and Adam Calvert had 
back-to-back doubles. 
Serge Belcastro singled in 
a run, Chris Cotter had an 
RBI pinch double and Pat 
Shea had an RBI. 

Earlier Morrisette had 
swept a doubleheader fi-om 
Holbrook, 12-0 and 16-2. 

It combined good 
pitching, strong hitting and 
fine defense as it pounded 
out 31 hits in the two 
games. 

Matt OToole pitched a 
complete game in the 
opener, picking up his 
fourth win along with a tie 
and lowered his ERA to 
1.00. He gave up six hits 
and two walks and 
Morrisette came up with 



four double plays. 

Danny Duncan got his 
second start in the second 
game and recorded his 
second win. He struck out 
nine in five innings. He 
gave up five hits and three 
walks and both Holbrook 
runs in the first were 
unearned. Morrisette had 
two more double plays, 
making it 20 for the 
season. 

Shea went 5-for-7 in the 
two games, including a 
triple, and drove in six 
runs. Super-sub Calvert 
went 6-for-8 with three 
RBI, Belcastro went 3-for- 
7 with two triples and five 
RBI, Jay had two doubles, 
Reinhart two hits and two 
RBI, Tom Malvesti two 
hits and an RBI, Hayes 
two hits, Duncan tripled in 
a run, Kane went 4-for-6, 
drove in two and scored 
four times and Art Carthas, 
Mark Cahill, Andy Joyce 
and Cotter also had hits. 

Monday night Quincy 
(7-10) pulled an upset by 
edging Milton, 6-5. 

Earlier Quincy had 
defeated Canton, 12-7, as 
Terry Gaide went 4-for-4 
with two RBI and was the 
winning pitcher. Wirtz, 
Karlson, Tom Nudey and 
Steve Provost all had two 
hits. Tim Byrne picked up 
the save. 



Legion All-Star Game 



The 10-team Zone 6 
and IS-team Zone 10 
American Legion baseball 
all-stars will meet in an 
18-year old all-star game 
Suiiiday at 8 p.m. at Adams 
Field. 

Tickets are $2 for adults 
and children are free. 
Proceeds will be used to 
help in scleroderma 
research. Many people. 



especially women, suffer 
fi-om the disease. 

Two players from each 
team will play the game. 

Representing Zone 6 
will be Pat Shea and 
Robbie Kane of 
Morrisette; Tom Nutley 
and Terry Gaide, Quincy; 
Jeff Craig and Mark 
Swirbalus, Wollaston; 
Adam Inglese and Bill 
Donahue, Weymouth; 



Mike Schute and Sean 
Lynch, Braintree; Tom 
Fitzmaurice and Jim 
Mann, Holbrook; Mike 
O'Leary and Robert Butler, 

West Roxbury; Ben 
Barlow and Kyle 
Snowden, Milton; Adam 
Yaz and Chris Mann, 
Canton and Mike 
Saraceno and Greg O'Neil, 
Randolph. 



Joanna Rugnetta of 
Quincy has been named 
co-captain of the 
UMass/Boston women's 
basketball team for the 
1993-94 season. 

Rugnetta, a 5-10 
forward who will begin her 
junior year this fall, was 
second on the team with 
6.9 rebounds per game last 
season. She also led the 
team with 43 blocked 
shots and averaged 7.1 
points while playing in all 
25 of UMass/Boston's 
g;uiics. Rugnetta blocked 
a career-high seven shots 
against UMass/Dartmouth, 
and had a career-highs 
with 15 points and 15 
rebounds in 69-66 win at 
Suffolk. She followed that 
up with another 15 points 
and 10 rebounds along 
with four blocks in the 
Beacon's next game, a 79- 
69 win at Eastern 
Nazarene, Rugnetta 
grabbed 10 or more 
rebounds eight times in 
1992-93. 

UMass/Boston matched 
its highest win total in 
three seasons in 1992-93 
with an 8-17 mark under 
the guidance of third-year 
Coach Dana Brown. The 
squad opened the season 
with a 6-3 start, the best 
by the program in 11 years. 
"We are pleased to 
have someone of Joanna's 
caliber as one of our co- 
captains," said Brown. 
"Obviously, she has the 
ability and desire to be a 
team leader. We are 
expecting great things 



Softball 




JOANNA RUGNETTA 



from her next -season." 

Rugnetta also led the 
Beacons with 37 blocked 
shots as a freshman and 
averaged 5.6 rebounds and 
4.3 points wile playing in 
all 23 of the team's games. 
In addition to playing 
basketball at the Harbor 
campus, Rugnetta was 
also a member of the 1 992 
women's volleyball team, 
where she played the 
middle blocker and middle 
hitter positions. 

A graduate of North 
Quincy High School, 



Rugnetta played four years 
for the basketball team, 
earning three varsity 
letters as well as Patriot 

Ledger All-Scholastic 
honors as a senior tri- 
captain. Rugnetta also 
played three years for the 
North Quincy volleyball 
team, earing two varsity 
letters. 

Rugnetta remains 
active in a variety of 
community service groups, 
including peer education, 
D.A.R.E. and S.A.D.D., aU 
at North Quincy. 



Liberty Wins 19th 



Track 



Sawan, Crehan Gold Medal 
Win At Bay State Games 



Two Quincy athletes 
captured gold medals in 
track and field action at 
last week's Bay State 
Games at MIT. 

Liz Sawan, a Quincy 
High freshman, won the 
scholastic girls' mile and 
Eileen Crehan, former 
North Quincy High and 
Northeastern University 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



star, took the open 
women's javehn. 

Sawan used a blistering 
last lap kick to pull away 
from the 12-girl field to 
win in a personal best time 
of 5:33.6. 

For Crehan it was a 
return from retirement after 
marriage and three 
children. Her toss of 126- 
10 was far below the 164-3 
she threw back in 1984 to 
set the Mass. and New 
England all-time record* 
while at North Quincy 
High, but this meet marks 



a return and Ms. Crehan, 
now a state trooper, has 
vowed a comeback. "I 
think with steady training 
I'll be back to 150 feet 
very soon," she said. 

Other Quincy athletes 
placing in the top six 
included Tricia Hughes in 
the triple jump, Maureen 
Roche, third in the shot 
put; Kevin Ross, sixth in 
the scholastic boys' shot 
put, and Jennifer Pratt, 
fourth in the scholastic 
women's high jump. 



Liberty Lounge 
improved its record to 19-0 
in the Quincy Men's 

Softball League C 
Division as it 

overwhelmed Shooters II, 
35-2, as it pounded out 46 
hits including six home 
runs. 

Malachy's II of the A 
Division topped 

Washington Tap I of the B 
Division, as Steve Touma 
and Rick Kelly had three 
hits and two RBI apiece. 

Bob Hedlund, Tom 
Handrahan and Frank 
Micelli had two hits each 
and Dennis Kelly, Joe Joy, 
Jim Grass and Paul 
Stanton one each. Mike 
Peterson and Paul Casey 
pitched well. 

Mike Bates and Charlie 
Hicks played well for the 
Tap. 

The annual all-star 
games were played last 
Saturday and in the A 
Division the West 
defeated the East, 10-5. 

Pitcher Chuck Sullivan 
allowed only one run in 
four innings and added a 



run-scoring single. He was 
named the games MVP. 

His Hines Plumbing 
teammate Paul Cedrone 
hit a mammoth two-run 
homer and Ken Markem 
and Bruce Tobin of the 
Fowler House hit solo 
home runs. The three 
homers came in 
succession. Paul Messina 
was injured and was 
unable to return. Rob 
Bums and Bill Chase of 
Fowler House and Tom 
Dormady of Hines played 
well. 

For the West Mike and 
Gerry Cochrane hit long 
home runs. 

In the B Division the 
East topped the West, 5-3, 
in the best game of the 
night. 

Player/coach/catcher 
Rick Radzik of Alumni 
Cafe had three hits and 
two RBI and received the 
MVP award. 

Robbie Glynn of Beau's 
Place had a two-run homer 
and J.J. Powers of Brigham 
and Women's Hospital had 
a double. Steve Spencer, 
Bruce Kannenburg and 



Dave Rodgers of Beau's 
Place played well. 

Larry McGue and 
Charlie Hicks represented 
Washington Top, Randy 
Hoblitzelle, Mike Huygo, 
Dave Brolin and Doug 
DriscoU of Liberty lounge 
played well and Guy 
Bognanno of Fab Tan had 
a hit. 

In the C Division the 
West rolled over the East, 
22-2. 

Pitcher Bob HenneUy of 
Liberty Lounge allowed 
only one unearned run and 
had three solid hits. Jim 
Hatfield of Hat Rock had a 
three-run homer and two 
other hits and was named 
the MVP. Spike 
Fitzsimmons of Liberty 
had a homer and Jeff Drew 
of Liberty had two hits. 
Chris Leoncello and Mike 
Sheils of Noll Electric 
played well as did Dave 
Angelos and Ed Devin of 
Continental Cable and Ed 
DeMarquez of Liberty. 

League director John 
Powers and commissioner 
Mike Lonegan did a fine 
job organizing the games. 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 15 



Junior Baseball 



Babe Ruth 



Continental Wins Title 
Behind Bregoli's No-Hitter 



Osco Outlasts 
Everlasting For Title 



Continental Cable 
defeated Colonial Federal, 
5-1, as Chris Bregoli 
pitched a no-hitter, to win 
the Quincy Junior Baseball 
League championship. 

Bregoli struck out a 
season-high 17 batters and 
no Colonial Federal batter 
was able to put the ball in 
play. The only out not a 
strikeout came when 
catcher Mike Powers 
threw out Mike Shaw 
trying to steal second. 

Cable took a 2-0 lead in 
the first inning. Chad 
Fitzpatnck walked and 
Bregoli tripled and scored 
on an over throw. 

Colonial Federal scored 
once in the second as 
Mike Sullivan walked, 
went to third on a passed 
ball and scored on an 
overthrow. 

Bregoli hit his fourth 
home run of the playoffs in 
the third. Powers followed 
with a double and scored 
on Kevin Walsh's single. 

Cable scored its final 
run in the sixth when Paul 
Carney was hit by a pitch, 
was bunted along by Chris 
Wilson and scored on 
Fitzpatrick's single. 

Cable, which won the 
American League title, 
moved into the 
championship game by 
defeating National League 
champion Rotary, 12-4, 
and rolling over Colonial 
Federal, 17-3, in the 
semifinals. 

Rotary took an early 2-0 



lead when Frank Curreri 
and Adam Goodrich 
singled and scored on 
Billy Connolly's triple. 

Cable exploded for 10 
runs in the bottom of the 
first. Fitzpatrick, Tim 
O'Connor and Bregoli all 
reached and Powers and 
Wash followed with hits. 
With two outs Billy Davis 
walked, Fitzpatrick 
doubled in a run, O'Connor 
reached on an error and 
Bregoli hit a two-run 
homer to left. 

Cable closed out its 
scoring in the fourth. Mark 
Dunn and Fitzpatrick led 
off with hits, Bregoli hit a 
sacrifice fly and Powers 
singled in the final ran. 

Cable pounded out IS 
hits in its semifinal win 
over Colonial Federal. 

Cable took a 2-0 lead in 
the first as Dunn walked, 
Bregoli doubled and 
Powers singled both runs 
in. Tom Daley put 
Colonial Federal on the 
board with a home run 
over the left field fence. 

Cable took a 7-1 lead 
with two outs in the 
second. Davis walked, 
Fitzpatrick singled and 
Dunn walked. Bregoli 
doubled in two runs and 
Powers singled in two 
more. 

Mike Shaw singled in 
Sean Boostroom in the 
second for Colonial. 

In the fourth Walsh 
doubled and as did Powers. 

Cable scored six runs in 



the fifth. Carney doubled 
and, after two strikeouts, 
Fitzpatrick and Dunn 
singled. Powers and 
BregoU walked and Walsh 
and Ryan Hutchings 
singled home two more 
iiins. 

Bregoli's three-run 
homer into the screen in 
the sixth completed the 
scoring for Cable. Colonial 
added a run on Matt 
Lebo's single driving in 
Randy Feetham. 

Walsh pitched a 
complete game, giving up 
six hits and striking out 
five. 

Bregoli, Powers, Walsh 
and Fitzpatrick all had 
outstanding series. 

Powers batted .765 in 
the playoffs with eight of 
his 13 hits doubles driving 
in eight runs. Bregoli 
pitched three games and 
strack out 44 of 54 batters. 
He also hit four home runs 
and drove in 14 runs, while 
scoring 11 times. Wash 
won two games pitching 
and batted .500 while 
driving in five. Fitzpatrick 
batted .467 and scored 11 
runs. 

The cable roster 
included Joe Ardagna, 
Bregoli, Carney, Davis, 
Mark Dunn, Fitzpatrick, 
Paul Flynn, Hutchings, 
Matt Moriarty, O'Connor, 
Powers, Walsh, Mike 
Welch and Wilson. Fran 
Walsh was head coach 
and Paul Bregoli assistant 
coach. 



Osco Drug outlasted 
Everlasting Engraving, 19- 
17, to win the International 
Babe Ruth League 
championship. 

Wife defeated husband, 
daughter hit tor the cycle 
for the winners and 
husband has to cook dinner 
for a month. 

Osco was coached by 
Marie Gallagher and 
Everlasting by her 
husband, Mike. Daughter 
Kate hit a home run, 
triple, double and single 
for Osco. 

Everiasting made a fine 



comeback after trailing, 
16-6, after four innings but 
three runs in the bottom of 
the sixth clinched the win 
for Osco. 

For Osco Kerry Ginty 
had three singles, winning 
pitcher Joe Vando two 
doubles and a single, 
Kevin Sullivan two triples 
and a single, Eric Sullivan 
three singles, Brian 
O'Connor two singles and 
John Keely a double. 

Kate Gallagher made a 
diving catch for the last 
out of the game and held 
up the ball to show her 
father. Also playing find 



defense for Osco were 
Jason Lumighini, John 
Harter, Dennis Palardy, 
Matt Louis and Daniel 
Conway. 

For Everlasting Mike 
Lynch had two doubles 
and a triple, Chris Burden 
two singles and a double, 
Matt Langille two doubles, 
losing pitcher John 
Laukkenan a double and 
triple and John Flibotte a 
triple. 

Defensively Bill 
O'Connell, Jacob Fleming, 
Steve Shaw, John Leonard 
and Mike 
stood out. 



Triple A 



Hurley Championship 
Comeback Climax 



The Hurley Insurance 
Padres had to rally late in 
the season to make the 
playoffs and they went on 
to win the Triple A 
Baseball League title with 
a nine-inning 11-10 victory 
over the Yellow Cab 
Athletics in the 
championship game. 

In this game, which 
lasted 31/2 hours, the 
Athletics led, 8-2, after 
five innings. The Padres 
came back with six rans in 
the sixth to send the game 
into extra innings. 



In the seventh the 
Padres went ahead by two 
but the Athletics came 
back with two to tie it 
again. The Padres won it 
with two runs in the ninth. 

The Padres had opened 
the playoffs by edging the 
National League champion 
Mets, 11-10. 

In the second game the 
Padres posted an 11-8 win 
over the White Sox and 
they then upset the 
American League 
champion Yankees, who 
bad a 17-2 regular season 
records. 



This game made the 
front pages of newspapers 
as the police chased a 
suspected drug dealer 
across the field and he was 
captured by the Padres' 
coaches. 

"To name the stars of 
the final game would take 
my entire roster as well as 
the Athletics' roster," said 
Padres coach Tom 

"They were all stars and 
they provided us with the 
single most exciting game 
I've ever seen. The only 
sad not was that somebody 
had to lose." 



Noble^s Efforts Not 
Enough As Oilers Bow 



St. John's Golf 
Tournament Results 



Quincy's Chris Noble 
had another outstanding 
game last Friday night for 
the Randolph Oilers of the 
Eastern Football League, 
but his heroics went for 
naught as the defending 
champion Marlboro 
Shamrocks edged the 
Oilers, 40-28, on a field 

goal on the final play of 
the game. 

Noble paced the Oilers 
to a 28-14 lead as he threw 
for 230 yards and three 
touchdowns. He passed to 
Charlie McCoy for 22 
yards and a score and Ray 
kicked the point for a 7-0 



St. John's Parish held its 
lead McGee. fi«t golf tournament at 

Following a Marlboro Mariboro chipped away ^^^^J^^^^^f 'J^J^Jriend^ 
punt Noble hit Harding for and cut the Randolph lead panshioners and fnen^^ 
22 yards, then hit Ricky to 28-27. With rime joined Fr. William 
' running out and Marlboro 

quarterback Dave Palazzi 
led his team 60 yards 
downfield and on the last 
play of the game John 
Toyias kicked the winning 



Witt for 39 for the second 
touchdown and a 14-0 lead 
as added the PAT. 

After a Mariboro TD, 
Noble hit Witt on a fly 



McCarthy, pastor, and 
Father Peter Quinn, 
tournament director. 



Maureen Duggan, Paul 
O'Leary and Gigi Wallace 
at nine under. 

Eddie Duff was closest 
to the pin on the 18th hold 
and Rick Devaney closest 



to the line on the 12th 
hold. 

A steak bake and 
awards banquet followed 
in the church hall. 



pattern for a 65-yard score 33-yard field goal 



to put Randolph up, 21-7. 
At the half Randolph led, 
21-14. 

Randolph made it 28-14 
eariy in the third period on 
a 60-yard run by former 
Brockton High star Jay 



This Friday night the 
Oilers will play the 
Mitchell Memorial Club 
Cobras of Middleboro in 
an 8 p.m. game at 
Middleboro's Battis 
Stadium. 



The winning team at 12 
under par included Bob 
Kelley, Jan Kelley, Rick 
Devaney and Ken Gately. 

Second was the team of 
Michael Gilcoine, Joe 
Rotondo, Ralph Thibodeau 
and Wil Thibodeau at 10 
under and third was the 
team of Don Duggan, 




Always Buying 
New&Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Cong^ele Line (rfSqjplies 



II SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

FILL OUT THIS SUBSCRIPTION BLANK AND MAJl TO 



.-JM/. 



^/, 



1372 HANCOCK STREET, QUINCY, MA 02169 



NAME 



STREET 
CITY 



.STATE. 



ZIP- 



CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



( ) 1 YEAR IN QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY 

( ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE 



$12.00 
$14.00 
$17.00 



( ) 
( ) 



CHECK ENCLOSED 
PLEASE BILL ME 



by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 

A COOL IDEA 

Drivers who subjecttheir prevent radiator boil-oyer 




J 



vehicles to the strain of 
towing should consider the 
installationofatransmission 
cooler to protect their ve- 
hicles' transmissions. Tow- 
ing trailers, boats, and 
campers causes both the 
engine and automatic 
transmission to run hotter 
than normal. When oil terri- 
peratures inside automatic 
transmissions exceed 200 
degrees F. for prolonged 
periods, the oil breaksdown. 
As a result, seals crack and 
leaks occur, leading to 
transmission failure. To help 
dissipate this heat, a trans- 
mission cooler acts much 
like an auxiliary radiator. Not 
only does it help preserve 
the health of the transmis- 
sion, but cooler transmis- 
sion fluid running through 
the cooling system helps 



HINT: Half of all radiator 
boil-overs are caused by hot 
transmission fluid running 
through the cooling system. 
LEO & WALT'S 
SUNOCO would like to re- 
mind you that our techni- 
cians here at 258 Quincy 
Ave., E. Braintree (843- 
1550) look fonward to the 
challenge of giving your car 
the same level of personal 
attention they give their own. 
Whether you need to have 
your spark plugs replaced, 
or more extensive work 
done, make us your first 
stop. Ask about our ALL- 
DATA computer system, 
that provides us with the 
latest information from the 
manufacturer. "A Place 
Where Your Car Can Live 
Longer." Sunoco and most 
major credit cards honored. 



Page 16 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 



Ward 2 Civic Assn. 
Field Day Winners 



207 Compete In Local 
Hershey Track Meet 



The Ward 2 Civic 
Association recently held 
its fourth annual field day 
at Fore River Reld. 

The results: 

Doll carriage parade: 

1, Alexa Dorin; 2, Brittany 
Pertelle; 3, tie between 
Kristy Harrington and 
Danielle Brodeur. 

Bicycle parade: 1, 
Laura Janowich; 2, Ashley 
Peterson; 3, Andrew 
Trubiaix). 

Horrible parade: 1, 
Jonathan LaFleur, 2, Ryan 
McCarthy. 

Girls dashers: 4 and 
under: 1, Brittany Nesto; 

2, Kristie Harrington. 5 and 

6 years old: 1, Alhson 
Grant, 2, Megan Peterson. 

7 and 8: 1, Jenny LaFleur; 
2, Meghan Chagnon; 3, 
Amanda Erichiello. 9 and 
10: 1, Jen Doyle; 2, Laura 
Janowich; 3, Emily 
Johnson. II and 12: 1, 
Leanne Martin; 2, Kaitlyn 
Sullivan; 3, Maeve Glynn. 

Girls three-legged 
race: 5 and 6 years old: 1, 
Megan Peterson and 
Allison Grant. 7 and 8: 1, 
Ashley Qifford and Nicole 
Purtell; 2, Jenny LaFleur 
and Amanda Erichiello; 3, 
tie between Megan 
Chagnon and Marybeth 
McCarthy, Megan 
Peterson and Colleen 
Martin. 9 and 10: 1, Emily 
Johnson and Laura 
Janowich; 2, Ashlee 
Qifford and Jen Doyle. 1 1 
and 12: 1, Katie Sullivan 
and Leanne Martin; 2, 
Jamie McCarthy and 
Maeve Glynn; 3, Erin 
Joyce and Christine 
McLaughlin. 

Girls sack race: 4 and 
under: 1, Sarah Dodd; 2, 
Brittany Nestor; 3, 
Brittany CarUss. 5 and 6: 
1, Megan Peterson; 2, 
Allison Grant. 7 and 8: 1, 



Glynn; 2, Leanne Martin; 
3, Kaitlyn SuUivan. 

Girls wheel barrel: 4 
and under: 1, Megan 
Peterson and Brittany 
Nestor; 2, Allison Grant 
and Courtney Mary 
Snyder. 5 and 6: 1 , Allison 
Grant and Sarah Dodd. 7 
and 8: I, Tiffany Kemp 
and Ashlee Clifford; 2, 
Jenny LaFleur and 
Amanda Erichiello; 3, tie 
between Meghan Chagnon 
and Marybeth McCarthy, 
Colleen Martin and Laura 
DiPietro. 9 and 10: 1, 
Emily Johnston and Laura 
Janowich; 2, Kelly Walker 
and Jen Doyle. 11 and 12: 
1, Jamie McCarthy and 
Elizabeth McMahon; 2, 
Kaitlyn Sullivan and 
Leanne Martin; 3, Siobhan 
Farrell and Maeve Glynn. 

Boys wheel barrel: 4 
and under: 1, Joshua 
Geddis and Tim 
DeCristofaro; 5 and 6: 1, 
Bret Martonson and Ryan 
McCarthy; 2, Robert 
Brodeur and Michael 
Erichiello. 7 and 8: 1, 
James White and Cody 
Bennett; 2, Timmy 
McMahon and Brendan 
Chfford; 3, Martin Walsh 
and Steven Johnson. 9 and 
10: 1. Steven Johnson and 
Billy Gavell; 2, Billy 
Doran and Ronald 
Batherwich; 3, James 
LaFleur and Michael 
Doherty. 11 and 12: 1, 
Robert Batherwich and 
Mark Doyle. 13 and 14: 1, 
Michael McCarthy and 
Jonathan LaFleur. 

Boys sack race: 4 and 
under: 1, Darmy Pitts; 2, 
Timothy DeCristofaro; 3, 
Joshua Geddis. 5 and 6: 1, 
John Santon; 2, Bret 
Martonson; 3, Ryan 
McCarthy. 7 and 8: 1, 
James White; 2, Cody 
Bennett; 3, Chris Doran. 9 



Jonathan LaHeur, 2, Ryan 
McDonald; 3, Michael 
McCarthy. 

Boys three-legged 
race: 5 and 6: 1, Bret 
Martonson and Bryan 
McCarthy; 2, Robert 
Brodeur and Ryan Scott; 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department recently 
sponsored an area 
competition as the first 
step in the Hershey 
National Track and Field 
Youth Program. 

Two hundred and seven 



Boys 9-10: 50 meter meter nin, Pat Egan; 1600 

dash, Christopher Wilson; ^eter run, Aaron Marshall; 

100 meter dash, 4X100 meter relay, Aaron 

Emmanuel Kalu; 200 Marshall, Jim Finn, Jim 

meter dash, Bryan Quigiey, Kevin Connolly; 

Thornton; 400 meter run, standing Long Jump, 

John McCarthy; 4X100 Kevin Connolly; SoftbaU 

meter relay, Sebastian Throw, Aaron Marshall. 



3, Linehan Erhardt and boys and girls participated 

Jason Thomas. 7 and 8: 1, in three age categories. 

Brendon Clifford and 

Timmy McMahon; 2, 

Chris Doran and Bret 

Martonson; 3, James 

White and Cody Bennett. 

9 and 

Curran 



Winners of the local 
meet have their times and 
distances compared to 
winners from 39 other 
local meets in the state of 
10: 1, Tommy Massachusetts. The top 
and Ronald eight qualifiers will 



Batherwich; 2, James compete at the State 

LaFleur and Michael Championships in 

Doherty; 3, Timmy Braintree on Friday, July 

McMahon and Billy 16. 



Doran. 11 and 12: 1, Billy 
Gavell and Robert 
Batherwich; 2, Jason Page 
and Mark Doyle. 13 and 
14: 1, Jonathan LaFleur 
and Michael McCarthy. 

Boys dashers: 4 and 
under: 1, Tyler Zemp; 2, 
Joshua Geddis; 3, Tim 
DeCristofaro. 5 and 6: 1, 
Robert Brodeur; 2, John 
Santon, 3, Brett 

Martonson. 7 and 8: 1, 



The winners of the 
Massachusetts 
championship are 
compared to winners from 
meets held in the six other 
northeast states and the 
top qualifiers receive an 
all expense paid trip to the 
National Championships to 
Hershey, PA. in August. 

Local meet winners 
from the Quincy 
competition have 
advanced to the nationals 

James White; 2, Timmy eight out of the last nine 

McMahon; 3, Chris Doran. yeare. 



Gogola, Emmanuel Kalu, 
Chris Wilson and David 
Buckley; Softball Throw, 
Kyle Piazza; Standing 
Long Jump, Bryan 
Thomtoa 

Girls 11-12: 100 meter 
dash, Kimberly Huerth; 
200 meter dash, Juliann 
Battaglia; 400 meter run, 
Sarah Kane; 800 meter 
mn, Yvette Molina; 4X100 
meter relay, Maureen 
Halloran, Yvette Molina, 
Juliann Battaglia, 
Kimberly Heurth; Softball 
Throw, Maureen Halloran; 
Standing Long Jump, 
Sarah Price. 

Boys 11-12: 100 meter 
dash, Patrick Grogan; 200 Trade 
meter dash, Chris 
Licciardi; 400 meter run, 
Tim Pezzulo; 800 meter 
run, Michael Buckley; 
4X100 meter relay, Chris 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch noted the 
Hershey National Program 
is endorsed by the 
National Recreation and 
Park Association and 
President's council on 
Physical Fitness and 
Sports. 

"This meet continues to 
provide youngsters with 
enjoyment, physical 
competition and the 
opportunity to participate 
in a positive leisure time 
activity with boys and girls 
from all fifty states," he 
said. 

Welch also praised the 

involvement of the Quincy 

club as being 

instrumental in the 

program's success. 

"The Quincy Track 
Club philosophy of 
including all youngsters 



Licciardi, Joseph Watson, ^gardless of abihties is to 
Patrick Grogan, Tim 



Tiffany Zemp; 2, Ashlee and 10: 1, James LaFleur, 

Clifford; 3, Marybeth 2, BiUy Gavell; 3, Steven 

McCarthy. 9 and 10: 1, Johnson. 11 and 12: 1, 

Emily Johnston; 2, Jen Mark Doyle; 2, Robert 

Doyle, 3, Laura Janowich. Batherwich; 3, Larry 

11 and 12: 1, Maeve McDonald. 13 and 14: 1, 



9 and 10: 1, James 
LaFleur; 2, Steven 
Johnson; 3, Tommy 
Curran. 11 and 12: 1, Jason 
Page; 2, Mark Doyle; 3, 
Robert Batherwich. 

Women's wheel 
barrel: 1, Joyce Clifford 
and Mellissa McLaughlin; 
2, Lorretta Erichiello and 
Deborah Cabezas; 3, 
Brenda Harrington and 
Lynne Grant. 

Women's sack race: 1, 
Lorretta Erichiello; 2, 
Karen MacKenzie; 3, 
Joyce Clifford. 

Men's sack race: 1, 
Sonny LaFleur; 2, Steve 
Cabezas; 3, Marty Grant. 

Men's wheelbarrel: 1, 
Sonny LaFleur and Kevin 
Doyle; 2, David Erichiello 
and Robert SuUivan; 3, 
Marty Grant and Bob 
Harrington. 



The event is held in 
three age categories for 
boys and girls. T he 1993 
local Hershey's National 
winners are: 

Girls 9-10: 50 meter 
dash, Erin Connolly; 100 
meter dash, Erin Connolly; 
200 meter dash, Kelly 
O'Brien; 400 meter run, 
Jen Conley; 4X100 meter 
relay, Jennifer Djerf, 
Kimberly Holmes, Colleen 
Lahar and Kelly O'Brien: 
Softball ttirow, Erica Bell; 



Pezzulo, Softball Throw, 
Patrick Grogan; Standing 
Long Jump, Chris 
Licciardi. 

Girls 13-14: 100 meter 
dash, Coreen Chiminiello; 
200 meter dash, Emily 
Eddy; 800 meter run, Erin 



be admired," he said. "This 
positive reinforcement 
encourages each youngster 
to realize their full 
potential. The success of 
our Hershey program is 
due primarily to the 
overwhelming support of 
the Quincy Track Club. 



Barry; 1600 meter run. This partnership in the 
Enn Djerf; 4X100 meter event serves our citizens 
relay, Emily Eddy, Erin ^gy >• 
Barry, Courtney Paquette, 

Coreen Chiminiello; Track Club volunteers 
Softball throw, Kristy assisted the Recreation 
Deptula; Standing Long staff as meet officials. 
Jump, Erin Barry. Quincy Track Club 

Boys 13-14: 100 meter Director Geoff Hennessey 
Standing Long Jump, dash, Kevin Connolly; 200 served as the meet 
Kimberiy Holmes. ^^^^^ ^^^^ jj^ p-^. g^^ director. 



Presidents Golf Sullivan 
Tournament Results 



Quincy Chiropractor Wins 
Cape Cod Canal Race Walk 



Dr. Ann M. Doggett, 
Quincy Chiropractor, is the 
Women's Champion for 
the first Annual Cape Cod 
Canal 10k Race Walk, 
with a winning time of 68 
minutes. 

The 10k Race Walk is 
a new addition to the 
Canalside Festival, 
sponsored by the Cape 
Cod Chamber of 
Commerce. Sixty 

participants competed 

along the Canal route on 
Sunday, June 13. Race 
organizers plan to hold the 



Race Walk each year in 
conjunction with the 
summer Festival kick-off. 

Dr. Doggett practices in 
North Quincy and has been 
race walking for two years. 

"When I started race 



Technique with the 
national spokesperson from 
Reebok. 

Dr. Doggett's 

enthusiasm for race 
walking is extending to 
Quincy. Beginning in 



The Presidents Golf 
Course Ladies Association 
recently held stroke play 
and the qualifying round 
for the WGAM Dolly 
SuUivan Tournament. 

In stroke play Susan 
Martinelli, Kerri McGlynn 
and Nancy DiCarlo Jr. tied 
for the first net of 62 in 
Div. I. 

In Div. II Carol Cibotti, 
Marilyn Robert and 



first at 70. 

Sandra Jordan came 
closest to the pin on the 
seventh hole. 

In the Sullivan 
qualifying round Kerri 



was closest to the pin on 
the 13th hole. 

The Ladies also held a 
Best 15 tournament with 
Carol Magio having first 



McGlynn had low gross of net of 47 and Margaret 
73 and Sandra Jordon was Murphy second at 48 in 



WDcn 1 siaiicu rate v»""»-J- ^»-6»"""-o — \yf»ir;K,„ m«o»^, .;«j c 

walking." she said, "I July. Dr, Doggett and Marilyn Nestor tied for 

wanted to print up a T-shirt South Bay Chiropractic J»rst at 66 and in Div. Ill and Carol Maglio had a 



second at 82. 

Susan Martinelli had 
first net of 62 and Nancy 
DiCarlo Jr. was second at 
64. 

Alternates Lisa 
Kennedy had a gross of 84 



that said 'I'd Rather Be 
Running.' Now there's no 
way I'd go back to running. 
Race walking lets you 
exercise your mind as well 
as your body and spirit." 

Dr. Doggett recently 
completed training in the 
Reebok Body Walk 



will sponsor a Walking 
Club for anyone interested 
in walking for health and 
fitness. Walking times are 
Tuesday evenings, 5:30- 
6:30 and Thursday 
mornings, 10:30 to 11:30. 
Call 328-6300 for details 
and location. 



Nancy DiCario Sr. was net of 65. Moya Baldwin 



Div. I and Patty Buck had 
a low net of 50. Karen 
Deane 52 and Roberta 
McCannre 52 in Div. II. 
Irene Lancione had 50 in 
Div. in. Margaret Murphy 
was closest to the pin on 
the second hole and Pam 
Corradino on the 13th. 



Hole-In-One For Frank Ryan 



Frank Ryan of Quincy 
scored a hole-in-one at 
Norwood Country Qub and 
entered the annual 

Drambuie Rusty Nail 
Hole-in-One Sweepstakes. 



The ace was scored on the both eligible to win the 

140-yard seventh hole. grand prize, a one-week 

„ trip for two to Scotland, a 

Ryan and Rick , . ^ .. 

Finlayson, the golf pro ^IP tour of the Drambuuie 

who validated the 1^'q"^"^ <^«- ^"^ ^'^^^ 
sweepstakes entry, are 



cash. 



City Tennis Camp 
To Start July 26 

Recreation Director players and not beginners. strength training for tennis 

Barry Welch announces The camp is under the will also be discussed, 

the Quincy Recreation direction of John Campers will have the 

Department will hold its Franceschini, Tennis opportunity to play both 

Tennis Camp July 26-30. Instructor and Director of singles and doubles 

The camp will be held the Quincy Recreation competitively among other 

at the Quincy High Voc- Department Tennis campers. 

Tech Tennis Courts from Tournament for 20 years. 

8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Fundamental drills on 

Cost is $30. The camp is ground strokes, volleying 

open to boys and girls ^nd serve as well as 

entering grades 6, 7, 8, 9, strategy on singles and 

10, 11 and 12 and is doubles play will be 

designed for experienced taught. Conditioning and 



Registration is being 
held at the Recreation 
Office, 100 Southern 
Artery, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Regisu-ation is taken on a 
first come, first serve 
basis. 



City Ceramics Camp 
To Open July 26 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quiucy Sun Page 17 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department will bold its 
Ceramics Camp starting 
July 26. 

The camp will take 
place Mondays, 

Wednesday and Fridays 
until Aug. 6, from 1:30 to 4 
p.m. at the Dawes 
Memorial Estate, Quincy 
Shore Drive and Channing 
St. The camp is open to 
both boys and girls 
between the ages of 8 and 
14. Cost is $30. 

The camp is under the 
direction of Margie 
Swanton, a ceramic 
speciahst for the Quincy 
Recreation Department. 
The campers will be 
taught basic techniques in 
ceramics production. 



Instruction will include the 
cleaning of greenware, as 
well as staining and 
glazing of bisques pieces. 
The Recreation 

Department will supply all 
cleaning tools, paints, and 
brushes,a and the firing of 
all projects. A limited 
number of small pieces 
will also be supplied. 

Participants will be 
expected to supply larger 
pieces of greenware and 
special paints if they are 
needed. No previous 
ceramic instruction is 
required. Interested person 
can register for the camp 
at the Recreative Office, 
100 Southern Artery, 
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
Registration is taken on a 
first come, first serve 
basis. 



Boys Under 14 Shine 
In Bay State Games 



Quincy's under 14 boys' 
soccer team, sponsored by 
J.B. D'Aluessandro Corp., 
made an excellent 
showing in last week's Bay 
State Games, winning one 
and losing two one-goal 
decisions in 6-on-6 
competition at MIT. 

Quincy rolled past 
Weston, 8-0, as Russ 
Comer and Jared Downey 
had two goals apiece and 
Colin Shea, Josh Echelle, 
Bill Barron and Jeremy 
Riley one each. 

Quincy lost to Quabog, 
3-2, with Riley and Comer 



scoring the goals. 

Quincy then faced a 
hard-shooting Plymouth 
team and Quincy goalie 
Charlie Mawn foiled many 
of Plymouth's opportunities 
as he continued to stand 
out. Echelle headed 
Quincy's first goal in from 
a cross pass from Barron. 
Downey finished off 
Quincy's scoring. 

Also playing for Quincy 
were Brad Smith, Steve 
Wilson and Maik Stanton. 

Dick Shea and Russ 
Comer were the coaches. 



PR, etc. wins 
Three Advertising Awards 



PR, etc., a Quincy 
based public relations and 
marketing communications 
firm, recently received 
three awards at the South 
Shore Ad Club's 6th 
annual Ninth Wave 
Awards held at Plimotb 
Plantation. 

The agency won first 
place in the copywriting 
technical category, for an 
article written for Shields 
Health Care Group of 
Brockton, a Merit Award 
in the public 

relations/media relations - 
single item category for an 
article that company 
placed in "Administrative 
Radiology" magazine; and 
a merit award in the public 



GRAKITE 
LOCK CO 



StNVICf 



MOSIU 



tUTO-HOME-IUSINEtS 
.• DUOIOITS INS. AILED 
)• lOCKS RERETEO 
• DOOR CLOSERS 
) • PANIC HAROWAME 
AUTO KEYS FinED 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRT. QUINCY 

472-2177 



relations/media relations 
category for the city of 
Quincy's "Walk of Names" 
project. 

Georgia Peirce and 
Joyce Haglund, both 
Quincy residents, are the 
principals of PR, etc., 
which the two founded in 
1987. 



A DIET 
BREAKTHROUGH 

Break The 
"YoYo" Treadmill 

Experience the 
proven benefits of 

Thermo Crome 5000 



• Energizes without 
caffeine 

• Preserves lean body 
mass while dieting 

• Activates thermogenesis 

(burning of calories for energy 
by brown adipose tissue) 

• Controls sugar cravings 

To Order Send 
Check or M.O. For 

9 day trial supply-$10.00 
30 day supply-$35.00 

(Includes postage & handling) TO: 



P & B ASSOCIATES 

532 ADAMS STREET 
Suite 155, Milton MA 02186 

(617) 328-8374 



230 On Honor Roll 
At Atlantic Middle School 



Atlantic Middle School 
lists 230 students on its 
fourth quartet honor roll. 
They are: 

High Honors 
Grade 6: Robert BeU, 
Cecilia Cheng, Joseph 
Frechette, Fr».nkie Gee, 
Catherine Giordano, Leng 
Kry, Wallace Kwan, 
Brenda Lee, Yan Lin, 
Michael Neal, Kim Pham, 
Pat Vivatyukan, Kevin 
Walsh, Thomas Wilson. 

Grade 7: Katherine E. 
Bailey, Miranda Bohl, 
Wai Chan, Alison 
Connors, Jennifer Craig, 
Jessica Flanigin, Sundey 
Horn, Regina Lee, Guo 
Giang Li, Guo Xing Li, Fa 
Lo, Sharon Man, Kristina 
McManus, Wei Mei, 
Robin Ngo, Jennifer 
Nielson, Felipe Orneles, 
Chi Pham, Wei-Chen 
Shiah, Nadine Shweiri, Ho 
Tan, Sue Wong. 

Grade 8: Jennifer 
Alberti, Lanna Chan, May 
Chan, Siu Chan, Vicky 
Chan, William Chan, 
William Cheong, Patricia 
Christello, Jeffrey Chu, 
Paul Conroy, Brian Degan, 
Khanh Diep, Michael 
Doyle, Margaret Eng, 
Annie Gee, Mei He, 



Leanne Joyce, Wai Lau, 
Steve Law, Angela Lee, 
Jackson Lee, Elaine 
Leung, Annie Liu, Zhi Liu, 
Sai Lo, Krysiin 
MacRitchie, Magdalena 
Marczuk, Lori McCallum, 
Jodi McCann, Brian 
McFarland, Lynsey 
McNally, Erum Moin, 
Fong Ng, Wai Ng, Casey 
Ngo, Danathuy Nguyen, 
Huong Nguyen, Thai 
Nguyen, Sean O'Toole, 
Ching Tam, Ka Tam, Son 
Tan, Ho Tsui, Dai Vo, 

Brian Walsh, Eric Wirtz, 
Rudy Wong, Kee Yan, Li 
Zhao. 

Honors 
Grade 6: Rachel 
Bonanni, Jeffrey Burke, 
Sandy Castillo, Alice 
Chan, Hei Chan, Lisa 
Chan, Li Chen, Chi 
Cheng, Joanne Chiu, 
David Chu, Stephen Chu, 
Michael Cunniff, Henry 
Dinino, Brian Doyle, Erin 
Driscoll, Katie Erler, 
Nicholas Favorito, Mark 
Foster, Adam Gallegos, 
Nancy Gardner, Sean 
Hayhurst, John Hurley, 
Kamila Kloub, Jimmy 
Kou, Ricky Kwan, Tuan- 
Van Lam, Kathryn Lavery, 
Lowander Lee, Colleen 



MacDougall, John McCue, 
Yvctte Molina, Devin 
O'Brien, Rachel O'Hara, 
Christopher Petit, Steven 
Saccoccio, Wei-Jia Shiah, 
Eric Stoeckel, Amy Szeto, 
Renee Tasney, Judy 
Wong, Wing Yu. 

Grade 7: Vincent Au, 
Tracey Burke, Sean Carta, 
Yi Cen, Andrea Cheever, 
Miu Chen, Victor Chen, 
Gloria Chow, Julianna 
Chu, Leo Connolly, Quyen 
Diep, Brian EhrUch, Carrie 
Foley, Jason Ford, Jennifer 
Francis, Brian Gates, 
Gregory Giokas, Jasmin 
Gonzalez, Erinmarie 
Green, Anthony 

Greenwood, De Guan, 
Christopher Hall, William 
Hoey, Guot Hua, Matthew 
Kane, Pauline Kwan, 
Christina Ladopoulos, 
Connie Law, Serena Lee, 
Rachel Leschernier, Jun 
Leung, Ngoc Ly, Ishwar 
Mahadeo, Peter 

Managliotis, Amanda 
McCloy, Alanna 

McDonough, Than 
Nguyen, Megan 

O'Donnell, Dung Quach, 
Brian Ross, Gene 
Silverman, Man So, 
Rebecca Surratt, Lyna 
Tan, Chau Vo, Jocelyn 



West, Xing Xu, Barbara 
Yan, Lai Yu. 

Grade 8: Joshua Ahem, 
Trina Aitken, Benjamin 
Battams, Jennifer 
Beazley, Kate Bryan, 
Daniel Calnan, Marianne 
Cannon, Qing Chan, 
Crystel Cherico, George 
Culbreth, Rachel 
DiMattio, Elizabeth 
Downey, Christopher Erler, 
Victor Fok, Sean Glennon, 
Christine Goff, Jannette 
Gonzalez, Quan Ha, John 
Heim, Barbara Holbert, 
Hong Huynh, Jalinette 
Jimenez, Matthew 
Johnson, Christine Jones, 
Dawn Kohler, Lon Kry, 
Wai Lam, Shuk Leung, 
John Li, Li Li, Brenda 
Linehan, Mohammad 
Malik, Lewis Man, 
Vonnery Marcial, Scott 
Massey, Mark Paulsen, 
James Potter, Erica Quinn, 
Danielle Rinaldi, Laura 
Saccoccio, Abdirizak 
Said, Nicholas Shea, 
Christine Shields, Yu 
Shum, Daniel Stock, Scott 
Stuart, Erika Thompson, 
Kara Timbone, Jessica 
Vega, Amy Vermette, 
Shannon Williamson, 
Wing Yu, Li Zhao. 



Quality Printing 

at a 
Reasonable Price. 





We have computerized our 

t\/pesetting department 

and we're expanding our 

printing division. 



We Specialize in: 
Program Books, Brochures, Newspapers, 

Newsletters, Political Flyers, Tickets, 
Stationery, Envelopes and Typesetting. 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy Square 

471-3100 




Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 



Sheree Titan Joins 
Devine & Pearson 



MVrrATIONTOBiD 

Quincy Community Action Programs, Inc. (QCAP) invites 

Contractors to submit bid proposals for the rehabilitation of 76 

Broadway Street, Quincy, MA 02169. General bids will be 

received until 10XX) AM August 2, 1993 at QCAP Inc.'s Housing 

Office, 1 509 Harxxxk Street, Qiincy, MA 021 69. 

As part of the bid submission, all Contractors will be required to 

submit evider«e o* their Workmen's Compensation. Liability and 

Property Damage Insurance with the names of three job 

references showing that tfie Contractor has the ability to perform 

a project of t^iis nature. 

A Pre-Bid Conferenoe shall be held at the job site. 76 Broadway 

Street, Oincy. MA 02169 at 10O0 AM. July 26. 1 993 to provide 

appropriate information to assist Contractors in preparing their 

bids. Bids submitted by contractors not present at conference will 

not be accepted. 

Copies of the bidding documents will be available after July 1 9, 

1993 at QCAPs Housing Office at 1509 Hancock Street, Quincy, 

MA 02169 (Third Floor). Information may be obtained by calling 

AianLaBelaat47&8181. 

QCAP, Inc. reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to 

waive any intorrnafities in bkkJng, if it b in the public interest to do 

sa 

QCAP, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity/Mnority Business Enrterprise 

employer. 

Datod:Jiiy10,19g8 

7122m 



INVlTATiON FOR BIDS 



INVrrATTONTOBID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy, 
Massachusetts, will receive sealed bids for Contract No. 6, 
Woflaslon Certer lrnpro\«ments, Phase I, unS 10flO AM kxd time 
onTuesday, August 10, 1993 at tfie offices of the Commissioner of 
Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy. Massachusetts, 021 69, at 
which time and place all bids will be publicly opened and read 
akxjd. 

The work under this contract consists of selective cold planning of 
approximately 1275 feet of existing pavement installation of new 
pavement, new sidewaks, wheelchair ramps, resettir^ of curbs, 
adjustment of utility appurtenances, installatkxi of decorative 
(historic) lighting poles, modification of existing electrical 
distiibution and fire alarm systems, storm drainage and traffic 
lTlpro^ABme^fe. 

Al work shal be perfbrmed in acoordanoe with the CommcnweaHh 
of Massachusetts, Department of Public Works Standard 
Specifications for Highways and Bridges and Consti-uction 
Standards, as last revised, unless specified or dreded otherwise. 
Al work under the contract shal be completed withn 1 00 calendar 
days. 

A ncfvrefundable deposits $75.00 in cash or check payable tn 
the City of Quincy, will be required for each set of Contract 
Dcxajnenfew 

Bidders requesting Contract Documents by mail shall dso include 
an additional norMgfundable $15.00. cash or check payable to 
the City of Quincy, to cover Hie costs of shipping and handing. 
The Contract Documents may be obtained during tiie business 
hours 8:30 AM to 430 PM at the Offices of the Commissioner of 
Public Works, Engineering Division, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts 021 69 on CT after Weohesday, July 21 , 1 993. 
Each bid shall be accompanied by a bid security in tfie amount of 
five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in the form 
described h the Instructions to Bidders. 
The Successful Bidder must furnish a one hundred percert (1 00%) 
Construction Performance Bond and a one hundred percent 
Construction Payment Bond with a surety company acceptable to 
the City. 

The Bidding and award of tfiis Contract shaM be in full compliance 
with K4assachusetts General Laws, Chapter 30, Section 39M, as 
last revised. 

All prospective bidders must obtain pre-bld qualification 
certification from the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works, Contract RegJations Division, 10 Park Plaza, Room 7552, 
Boston, MA 021 1& 

This contract to t)e awarded as the result of this Advertisement for 
Bids is to be funded by tfie Department of Housing and Urtsan 
Development (HUD), the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Public Works and tfie City of Quincy. 
All Federal/State and City of Quincy regulations in relation to 
Minority Business Enterprise, Women Business Enterprise. 
Minority Work Force, Employment of Quincy Residents, as 
required under City Ordinance hJo. 532, and Minimum Wage 
Rates shall be oompfied with. 
Goals for this project are as foHows: 
t The Contractor shall maintain on this project not less 

than eleven percent (1 1 %) ratio of minority employees 
manfxxjTS to tolal manhous in each job category. 

2 Aminimumc<ele\«npefoert(11%)K^hori^Busness 

Enterprise (MBE) participation by state<»rtified MBlEs 
and V\CEs wl be required and maintained on ths 
project. The bidder shalsufcmit complete MBFyWRF 
forms wUh fie Bkj. 

2 The City d CXincy's Orcinaioe hto. 532, requiring 

Contractors workiig on City-supported construdkn 
projects to have one CXincy Resident out of every 
three workers on tfie project must be complied with. 

4 The Contractor shal pay the higher of the two minimum 

wage rates, as mandated by the Commonwedlh of 
Massachusetts Department of Labor and Industries axl 
tfie U.S. Department of Labor Wage Rates issued in the 
most current 'Wage Decisions" applicable to the area 

The City resents ttie right to waive any infomrjality in or to reject 

any or all Bids when such an action is deemed in the best interest 
of the City. Non-responsive and/or unbalanced bkJs may be 
rejected. 

DavidA.Colton 
Commissioner of Pubfc Works 
7/22/93 



Sheree Titan has been 
named Traffic/Production 
Coordinator al Devine and 
Pearson in Quincy. 

Her responsibilities 
include scheduling jobs 
and coordinating project 
status, as well as 
production assistance. 

Prior to joining Devine 
and Pearson, Titan worked 
as an office assistant at 
Duval and Partners in 
Boston. 

She is originally from 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMOfMWEALTHOF 

MASS/yCHUSETTS 

THE "miAL COURT 

PROBATE A^D 

FAMLYCOURT 

Noffak,ss. 

N0.93WQ244P1 

98WD24&P1 

StJM^IONSBY PUBUCATION 

Joseph RWhslow. 

Plaintiff 

v& 

The Estete and Person^ 

Represer^ative Of 

Christine Bieakney and 

to al Persons Interested. 

Dstendant 

To the above-named 

Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by the 
Plaintiff, Joseph R. Wrnstow. 
seeking Adjudication of 
Paternity and Custody of 
Amber Lee Bleakney and 
Joseph Charles Bleakney, of 
Quincy in said County, for 
reasons more fully set out in 
saidCompiainL 

You are required to serve 
upon Joseph R. Winslow, 
plaintiff, wfxse address is 100 
Washington St. #19, Quincy, 
MA 021 69 your answer on or 
before August 25, 1 993. If you 
fail to do so, the Court will 
proceed to the hearing and 
adjudication of this action. You 
are also required to file a copy 
of your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court at 
Decham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. 
FORD, Esq., Frst Judge of said 
Court at Dedham. 
Dated:July12,1993 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 

7/22.7/29,8^5/93 



Roslyn, N.Y. and obtained 
her undergraduate degree 
from the State University 
of New York at Albany. 
She now lives in Boston. 

Devine and Pearson is a 
full service advertising 
agency which is 
recognized for its skill in 
marketing products and 
services to consumer, 
trade and business to 
business sectors. The firm 
has won a number of 
awards including the 
Hatch, Clio, Andy and 
One Show, among others. 

LEGAt NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMLYCOURT 

NoribkDiviskn 

Docket Na9QPl711E1 

Estate of CHRBTejAG. 

MNJKAS 

late of Quincy 

In the County of NORFOU< 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying tiiat 
the last will of said decendent 
be proved and allowed and 
that ADOU^ S. MINUKAS of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

H you desire to object to 
the albwance of said petition, 
you or your attorney should fye 
a written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on 
Augu5t25. 1998. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement d objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
vwthin thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such otiier time 
as the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Ruie 16. 

Witness. Robert M. Ford. 
Esquire. Rrst Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. tiiis twelfth 
day of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7122m 



Flynn & Company 
Opens Springfield Office 



INVITATION FOR BIDS 



NVnATlON FOR BIDS 

CrTYOFQUNCY.MASSACHUSEnS 

PURCHASNG DffARTlVBJT 

1305 HANCOCK ST, QUNCY. MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids/proposals for furnishing and 
deivering to the City of Quincy: 

RRE DEFT.: ONE (1 ) CUSTOM PUMPER AUGUST 1 1 , 1 993 @ 
lOflOAM 

RRE DEFT.: CYUNDER REFILL SYSTBWl AUGUST 1 1 . 1993 @ 
1030 AM 

SW/D DEPT.:COLD WATER METERS AUGUST11, 1993@ 
110) AM 

SWID DEPT.: COMPUTERIZED WATER METER READING 
SYSTEM AUGUST11, 1993 <g>1iaO AM 
D/P/W DEFT.: FOUR (4) 35,000 GVW DUMP TRUCKS WFTH 
SANDER. RADIO PLOW & pro AUGUST 1 1 . 1 993 @ 1 30 PM 
D/P/W DEPT.: TWO (2) 31 ,000 GVW DUMP TRUCKS WITH 
RADIO. PLOW AND PTOAUGUSri1.1993@2flOPM 
D^/W DEPT.: ONE (1 ) 10 YD SIDE LOAD RUBBISH PACKER & 
CHASSIS WITH RADIO AUGUST 1 1, 1998@230 PM 
l>P/W DEPT.: ONE (1 ) 36 FT. AERIAL UFT Wrm WORK BODY 
& CHASSIS AUGUST 1 1 , 1 993 @ 3130 PM 

Detailed specifk:ations are on file at the office of the 
Purdiasing Agent, Quincy City Hal, 1 305 Hancock St., QuTKy, MA 
02169. 

Bids must state exceptions, if any. the delivery date and 
any alowable dsoounts. 

Firm bid prices wll be given firs* consideration and wil 
be received at tfie office of the Purctiasing Agent until tfie time 
and date stated above, at wfiich time and date tfiey wfll be pubfidy 
opened and read. 

Bids must t)e in a sealed envelope. The outside of the 
sealed envelope is to be clearly marked, "Bid Enclosed" with 
trne/date of bid caH. 

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to 
accept any part d a bid or tfie one deemed best for the City. 

James A. Sheets. MAYOR 
Robert F. Denvir, >, PURCHASMG AGBIT 
7/22/93 



Daniel J. Flynn and 
Company has expanded 
operations into western 
Massachusetts with its 
recent opening of their 
new offices in Springfield. 
The offices are located at 
1441 Main St. in the heart 
of Springfield's financial 

Kimberly Galvin 
On Dean's List 

Kimberly A. Galvin, 
daughter of Gregory and 
Joan Galvin of North 
Quincy is on the deans list 
at Suffolk University for 
the past semester. 

She will graduate in 
1994 with a degree in 
business management. 

LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

Tl-E PROBATE AND 

FAMLYCOURT 

NoriokDMskn 

Docket No. 98P1630GI 

NOTICE OF 
GUARDIANSHPof 
RCNTALLYLL 
To EARL C. ALLSOP, Sr., of 
QlflNCY in said County and al 
persons interested in the 
estate of EARL C. ALLSOP, 
Sr., and to tfie Massachusetts 
Department of Mental HeaHh, 
a petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that EARL C. ALLSOP. 
Jr.. of DUXBURY in the county 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
guardian of mentally ill with 
surety on tfie bond. 
If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 11, 1993. 
WITNESS, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, Rrst Justice of said 
Court at Dedham this twenty- 
ninth day of June, in tfie year of 
our Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-lhree. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/22/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

No. 93D-0894-D1 

SUMMONS BY 

PUBLICATION 

Paul L. Kenney. Plaintiff 

vs. 

Andrea Kenney, 

Defendant 

To the above named 

Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Paul L. 
Kenney, seeking a Divorce 
on the grounds of cruel 
and Abusive to-eatinent. 

You are required to 
serve upon Paul L. 
Kenney, plaintiff, whose 
address is 353 Sea St., 
Apt. 37. Quincy, MA 
02169 your answer on or 
before October 6, 1993. If 
you fail to do so. the Court 
will proceed to the hearing 
and adjucation of this 
action. You are also 
required to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court 
at Dedham. 

Witness. Robert M. 
Ford. Esq., First Judge of 
said Court at Dedham, July 
1, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 

7/22, 7/29, 8/5/93 



district. 

"With the addition of 
these new offices", said 
Daniel J. Flynn, III, 
president of the firm, "we 
will be able to better suit 
the needs of our clients in 
the western part of the 
state and Connecticut." 

Flynn and Company's 
entrance into the west 
market will allow the firm 
to utilize marketing 
techniques developed at 
its corporate headquarters 
in Quincy and attract the 
similar crowds to auctions 
in western Massachusetts. 

The Quincy based 
company is a fiill service 
marketing firm for the sale 
of real estate. Services 
include auctions, 
marketing strategies, and 
conventional real estate 
sales. For more 

information, call 1-800- 
649-0018. 

'L^^,im^ NOTI CES 

COMMOIW/EALTHOF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

T>€ PROBATE AMD 

FAMLYCOURT 

Noridk Division 

Dod«tNo.93P1611G1 

NOTICE OF 
GUARDIANSHFof 
METfTALLYLL 
To MARGARET G. DJERF of 
QUINCY in saki County and all 
persons interested in the 
estate of MARGARET G. 
DJERF and to the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Mental Health, a petition has 
been presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying that 
I^RJORIE CRISTADORO of 
QUINCY in the county of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
guardian of mentally ill with 
surety on tfie bond. 
If you desire to object to the 
aliowance of saki petition, you 
or your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
ten o'clock in tfie forenoon on 
August 11, 1993. 
WITNESS, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, Rrst Justice of said 
Court at Dedham ttiis twenty- 
ninth day of vAjne, in tfie year of 
our Lord one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRCK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7122m 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

TFE PROBATE AMD 

FAMLYCOURT 

NoribkOivisicn 

Dod«9tNo.93Pl686A1 
Estate of PAUL A. 

KOCH.Sr. 

lateofQUNCY 

in fie County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying that 
EUZABETH A. MACDONALD 
c< ABfJGTON in the County of 
PLYMOUTH be appointed 
administi-atrix of said estate 
wifriout surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to 
the aflowance of said petition, 
you or your attorney must fie a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
ten o'ckx* in tf» forenoon on 
August 25. 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, Rrst Justice of saki 
Court at Dedham, the twelftti 
day of July, in tfie year of our 
Lord one thousand nine 
hiJndred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRKK HUt«ES 

7/22m '^•^-*'^*- 



Thursday, July 22, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 19 




FORWENT 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Sone of Italy Social Center 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity - 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity • 140 
Call 47MM0 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

767-0519 TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouiri£y 

472-2223 



HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Hancfcapped Accessible. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-9824 

Monday through Saturday 4-7 pm tf 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

1 suitable for large functions 
(350-t- people); otfier suited for 
snialler functions (120 people). 
Call the George F. Bryan Post 

472-6234 W2 



COTTAGES 
FOR RENT 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, house- 
keeping cottages. Stu- 
dio and 3 room avail- 
able. Weekly rentals 
$200-$350. Private 
beach. Tennis avail- 
able. Call 328-1300, 9 
am to 6 pm 



TF 



APT FOR RENT 

Waterfront 1 bed- 
room, all new, 
Ig. porch, laundry. 
$650.00/month 
Includes 
everything. 
471-3952 
773-3020 7^ 



1 11 1 1 I H fWWWWW*^ 



m:Ni$Aii 



For Sale 

3 piece sectional. Beige with 
light blue pinstripe. Decent 
condition. $125 or B.O. Also 
glass coffee table $35.00 
984-1866 7/22 




$6RViOE$ 



PREQSOM 
LAMP 

REWKING 




ACE 



SSSUe 



Tinrn 

W-OMMor iLomcy ■UMrm 



VIKING 

ROOFING 

Residential 
Specialists 

773-2884 



9/9 



Janl-Clean Co. 

Insured - Certified Professional 

Carpet - Window Cleaners 

1 0% off Carpet Cleaning 

Free Fabric Protector with any 

2 upholstery iteins cleaned 
(617)341-3852 a/i2 



P^NTEP 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, old 
hand tods, all trades (machinist, 
pattern maker, watchmaker, etc.) 
shop lots. Also, antiquarian 
books, frames, paintings , crocks, 
lanterns. Antkfues in estate lots. 
1-617-558-3839 tf 



mstm. 



SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

Mattress Warehouse 
40% Savings 

Moved to Stoughton Center- 
next to Town Hall and P.O.- 
Rts. 138/27-344/4888 wzs 




Thank You 

Blessed Mother 

B.R. 7/22 



THANK YOU 
ST JUDE 

J.M.MyH.P.D. 7/22 



THANK YOU 
ST JUDE 

M.K.R 7/22 



THANK YOU 
ST JUDE 

CF.a 7/22 



THANK YOU 
St. Jude 

for prayers answered 

O.S. 7/22 



EVERfBOBfS MARKETPIME 



'■i m iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii M 

SERVICES 




SEBVIOES 



M I MM III M I M I MH W wm i M III HMm t H l MH 'WW^^fllHWWWWWWWW 



MM"H"M 4 n^^j^^n^^Mjj^fc^^^^^Mj^^,^,^^^^^^^^^^,^ 



EXPERt 

IMP unw 

g IfWMINC 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
OUINrv TF 



P ROFESSONAL 

REBMR 
WINDOVS 
&SCREesB 



Ad 



SSEUe 



vouMa 



TH-ITII 

NLOIMa MAMTMi 



LARRY'S 

HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior • Exterkir Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 
Ail Home Repaks 

Smali or L.arg« 
1-800-479-2476 tf 



ATTENTION 

Local cabinetmaker needs worki I 
will resurface your kitchen (with 
laminate of your choice), for less 
than half the cost of new cabinets. 

QUALiTY CRARIMANSHIP 
/ alto rmstor* antique himltura. 

W.F. ALLEN 
CABINETMAKER 

Over 30 yrs. experience 
(617)328-9048 

Leave Message a« 



J.D. PAINTING 

Quality work, 

reasonably priced. 

All work guaranteed. 

FREE estimates 

773-4541 



9/23 



O'HARTE MASONRY 

Complete Masonry 

Service Lie. & Ins. 

Phone Ted 

at 773-8622 

after 7 o.m. 7/» 



SULUVAN TREE SERVICE 

Pruning, removals, 

cat}leing, fertilizing, 

brush chipping. 

Fully Insured FREE est. 

Mike 472-3595 a/s 



CONSTRUCTION 

Roofing, painting, carpen- 
try, porch work, windows, 
door, gutters. Small jobs and 
vinyl siding. FREE esti- 
mates. T. Sweeney 
825-1210 Reliable 9/30 



sgBViCis 



SERVICES 



••vnfWffmffffffw 



A&T VACUUM 

•19.95 Overhaul Special on 
any vacuum 

• Sewing machine repairing 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 
•Sharpening 

(sdssors, knives, etc.) 
•Ored XL Vacuums $249 

• Eledrolux w/power nozzle 

$198. 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27BealeSt.,Wollaston 
479-^066 TF 



kM*IUMMi*MMMMMMM«MMMHMHMr 



Your South Shofv 

Heedquartora 

For 




AARONS GLASS 

Lowest pricesguaranteed. 
Plate and safety glass, 
screens, custom mirrors 
all shapes and colors, 
tabletops. 773-3290 900 



ATTENTION! 

Help an eager young college 
student finance his education 
Looking for: 

- Lawn jobs 

- Hedges Trimming 

- Gutter Cleaning 

- Odd Jobs 

Call for a free estimate and 
help me by letting me help you 

471-8541 
Ask for Ted or leave message 

7/22 



R. Papkey Painting 

Commercial & ReskJential 

Free Estimates 
Call Bob 
773-1531 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 
& APPLIANCE 

lis Franklin St . So Quincy 
4/2-1710 

TF 



YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 

Mowing Service 

• Expert Bush & 
Hedge Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Other Work-Ask 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 
Call Bill Fielding 

471-6124 8/26 



1(W14 



BICYCLE SPECIALTIES 

Tuneups and general re- 
pairs. All models. Free pick 
up and delivery. Page us 
at 468-8803. Punch your 
numt}er after beep 7/22 



^'mmmm 



ttitttttittitmmtitttttm 



oppoRTUNmr 

aMMMMiiiiMttaiasy^ ' iii:. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Tele jhone: 
471-3100 




J 



FRQfANE ' 

DCHANGE 
$7.99 

WEsroMcrcMr 

aceSSEUk 

^»-«w> voToma 

BINGO 

Knights of Columbus 

5 Hollis Ave 

Eariybird 7 PM, every 

Wednesday 

2 Winners take all 

Lucky 7s-Bonus 

FREE Coffee-Snacks «23 



MODELS 

2 YEARS OLD THRU ADULT. SEEKING NEW 
FACES FOR PROMOTION TO LOCAL AD- 
VERTISERS/COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS 
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. DETAILS & 
SELECTIONS AT 5 OR 7PM SHARP ON 
THURSDAY, JULY29thATSHERATONTARA- 
BRAINTREE, MA. 1-93 Exit 6. MINORS MUST 
BE WITH LEGAL GUARDIAN. 
HIGHLITE MODEUNG (717) 346-3166 7/29 




(FMASSACHUSETTSBAi^ 



m^^ 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock SL, Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 



RATES 



INDEX 



O Servicas 

D For Sale 

a Autos 

a BoaU 

D For Rant 

□ Wanted 

Help Wanted 

a Pats, Livestock 

O Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

J Real Estate Wanted 

O Miscellaneous 

O Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

a Coins A Stamps 

D Rest Homes 

Instruction 

O Day Care 

a Personal 

D Electrical ft Appiiances 



S-7WKIKt 

1-12 WEEKS 

IS WEEKS 
OR MORE 



D $5.00foron«lnaertk)n.upto20worda.l(»fore«:h«dditton«lword. 
a $4.e0perlnaartk)nupto20wordafof3-7ln*ertk)nao»the««me«d, 

1(M each addlttonal word. 
D $4J0p6flnaertk)nupto20wordtfor8-12lnaertlonaofthea«nnead. 

IOC more each additional word, 
a $4.00 per Inaertlon up to 20 words for 1 3 or mora Inaerttona of the 

aama ad, IOC each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
in The Quincy Sun 



Jor the following ad to run 



.weeks 



COPY: 



MO aEFUNO WILL ■« IIAOf AT T»«S CONTIUCT RATI IM TMK eVEUT OF CAMCltUTIOII. 
MAOUNK MONDAY. MO PM. PUASC INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 22, 1993 



Dr. Peter Shrier Director Of 
Hospital Women's Health Center 



Peter R. Shrier, M.D., a 
private practice 

obstetrician/gynecologist 
and a clinical instructor at 
Harvard University Medi- 
cal School, has been 
named director of the 
Quincy Hospital Center for 
Women's Health. 

Dr. Shrier will oversee 
the medical care for the 
Center's current patients 
and he is accepting new 
patients. The Center has 
one of the largest nurse 
midwif'rry practices in 
Massachusetts and 
delivered about 600 babies 
last year. 

He is on the Harvard 
Medical School faculty as 
an attending physician at 




DR. PETER SHRIER 

the gynecology clinic at 
Massachusetts General 
Hospital. He is also on 
staff at both the Mass 
General Hospital and 
Brigham and Women's 
Hospital. 



Agnitti 

INSURANCE 

HOME 'AUTO .BUSINESS 




He was 

a clinical 

with Tufts 

School of 



previously 
instructor 
University 
Medicine. 

He is Board certified in 
obstetrics and gynecology, 
a fellow of the American 
College of Obstetricians 
and Gynecologists and a 



fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons. 

Shrier was the associate 
medical director of 
General Medical 

Associates, a multi- 
specialty group practice in 
Weston. 

"The Center for 
Women's Health is an 
important medical 
resource for women south 
of Boston. Dr. Shrier's 
philosophy is very service 
oriented and he recognizes 
the unique contributions 
that nurse midwives make 
to women's health," said 
Quincy Hospital CEO 
Ellen Zane. 

A graduate of the 
University of Vermont 
College of Medicine, Dr. 
Shrier interned at the 
Jefferson Medical College 
Hospital in Philadelphia. 
He did his residency in 
obstetrics and gynecology 
at the Thomas Jefferson 
University Hospital, 
Philadelphia. 



Traffic Commission Meeting Today 



CALL FOR A QUOTE ON 
PROPER P4SURANCE 

COVERAGE AT 
COMPETmVE PRICES 

770-0123 



Drop In For Your Fret 
Insurance Dictionary 

.V(; Ohiigatuin 



21 FRANKLIN ST., QUINCY 



The Quincy Traffic 
Commission will meet 
today (Thursday) at 10 
a.m. in the Planning 
Department Conference 
Room at City Hall Annex, 
1305 Hancock St. 

Items on the agenda 
include an order regarding 
the installation of two 10- 
minute parking signs at 
12S Billings Rd. and 
another regarding the 
installation of a handicap 
parking sign in front of 59 



Hollis Ave. 

Old business to be 
brought up includes an 
order regarding the 
installation of a handicap 
parking sign in front of 10 
Manet Ave. and a 
resubmitted order 
regarding the installation 
of stop signs on Shed St. at 
its intersection with 
Sargent St. 

In addition, the Beale 
St. Improvement Project 
will be discussed. 



GRAND OPENING CONTINUES 



ONE 



GAS 



STOP 



Our Full - Serve Gas Station has five blends of 
gasoline available for your automotive needs. 

We are going back to the basics, remember the good 
old days of service at the pumps. 

Well , they're back at the one-stop-gas station. We will 
wash your windows, check your oil and check your tire 
pressure. 

Our attendants will greet and service you with a smile 
at the One-Stop-Gas Station. 



Professional, knowlegeable certified teclinicians 

We do the job right the first time! 



Petars 
Automoti)^ 



(61 7) 786-9080 (61 7) 472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 




"THE BLUE AND WHITE BUILDINGS' 



Fully Authorized Car Care Center 

WE DO IT ALL! 




PAUL SULLIVAN (right) of Sullivan Supply Co. presents check of $1,000 to Mayor 
James Sheets (left) and Police Chief Francis Mullen. The donation will fund the 
purchase of mountain bikes to be used by the Quincy Police Department. 

$1,000 Donation To Go Toward 
Police Mountain Bilges 



A $1,000 donation from 
a local businessman to the 
Quincy Police Department 
will be used to purchase 
"a couple of mountain 
bikes, according to Police 
Qiief Francis Mullen. 

The chief said that the 
bikes will be utilized as 
part of the department's 
special operations unit. 

"We're just trying to 



increase the number of 
different vehicles we have 
to expand our diversity," 
said Mullen. "It gives us 
another angle. Several 
other local departments 
have already begun using 
these bikes." 

Mullen said the 
donation came from Paul 
V. Sullivan of Sullivan 
Supply Co. on Liberty St., 



whom he knows 
personally. The chief 
added that there was no 
particular reason for the 
gift other than Sullivan's 
personal desire to do 
something for the 
department. 

"He's just happy to help 
us modify our program," 
said Mullen. 



Personalized Fitness Evaluations At YMCA 



Personalized fitness 
evaluations will be offered 
at the South Shore YMCA 
in Quincy beginning Aug. 
1. 

Interested individuals 
will undergo a private 75- 
minute computerized 
health and fitness 
evaluation by a trained 
technician. Muscle 
strength, cardiovascular 
endurance, body 

composition and joint 



flexibility will be 
determined, and realistic 
personal fitness goals will 
be established. Information 
from the overall 
assessment of health risk 
factors is provided in the 
computerized printout with 
estimated biological age 
and relevant 

recommendations for 
lifestyle patterns, exercise 
programs and nutrition 
choices. 



This evaluation is 
helpful for beginning 
exercisers who would like 
assistance setting up a 
well-balanced exercise 
regimen, as well as 
advanced-level exercisers 
who wish to set new goals 
and establish progress 
levels. 

For further details 
contact Brian Wessner, 
Associate Fitness Director 
at 479-8500, ext. 119. 



The words you hear 
at South Boston ' 
Savings 
Bank: 




33 



NO 
POMIS 

The South Boston Savings Bank's "NO POINTS" program is a 
great way to save much needed cash. 

There is no better way to purchase a home, or refinance an 
existing mortgage than with our limited time only "NO POINTS" 
program. 

Choose from a 7-1 or 1 5 year fixed rate mortgage, or a 1 or 3 
year adjustable rate mortgage. The 15 year rate listed below is just 
one example of our low mortgage rates. Act today . . . you could 
save a bundle! 

ANNUM. RATE PERCENTAGE RATE 

7375" 7^8'' 



15 YEAR 
FIXED RATE 
MORTGAGE 



Souih Boston 



ALmvS THE LEADER 



T S I WEYMOUTH 

EQUAL HOUSING "^ ^BE R ^^ ^ain Street 
LENDER FDICDIF 337-1050 



MAIN OFFICE 


NORTH QUINCY 


460 West Broadway 


440 Hancock Street 


South Boston 


773-8100 


268-2500 






QUINCY 


DORCHESTER 


690 Adams Street 


740 Gallivan Blvd 


Lakin Square 


825-9090 


479-9660 


NEEOHAM 


WEST ROXBURY 


355 Chestnut St 


1833 Centre St. 


449-0210 


323-8000 



Sun Editor Reports Fr 



is Pages 10-11 



,Baqn niv"^ ""^•'S "-"^"^i- 





VOL.25 No. 45 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 




Flooded Quincy (111.) And West Quincy (Mo.) 




AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH shows some of the 14,000 acres flooded in the Quincy, 01.- West 
Quincy, Mo. area when a levee broke July 23. The photo was taken looking west over 
the Mississippi River and the Bayview Bridge which links two Midwestern cities. The 

9 Candidates, Two Seats Vacant 

School Committee 
Preliminary Election 



lower portion of the photo shows the Mississippi River while the upper portion shows 
West Quincy, Mo. 

(James Sheets photo) 

Proposed Supermarket 
Runs Into Opposition 



The stage was set for a 
School Committee pre- 
Uminary election Sept. 14 
when nine candidates filed 
nomination papers for 
three seats—two of them 
vacant—at Tuesday's filing 
deadline. 

All together 19 
candidates filed but not 
enough for preliminary nm- 
off for three City Council 
at large and six ward 
coimcil seats. 

Mayor James Sheets 
will be unopposed for a 
third term, the first mayor 
in Quincy 's history to 
twice run without 
opposition. 

School Committee- 
woman Margaret (Peggy) 
King had nomination 
papers out but decided not 
to file them. 

School Committeeman 
Frank Santoro did not take 
out papers. 

This leaves two School 
Committee seats vacant 



with only one incumbent, 
Ron Mariano, in the race 
for the three seats. He 
filed Tuesday. 

The other eight 
candidates for School 
Committee are: Sean 
Barry, JoAnn Bragg, 
Christine Cedrone, 
Gregory Hanley, Toni 
Kabilian, Ronald 
McCarthy, John McDuff 
and John Spada. 

The top six qualifiers in 
the school committee 
preliminary election will 
advance to the city final 
election Tuesday, Nov.2. 

The City Council 
candidates will square off 
in the Nov. 2 final election 
without a preliminary 
ranoff. 

Incumbents Tim Cahill, 
Michael Cheney and 
Joseph LaRaia will be 
challenged by Mary 
Collins, former School 
Committeewoman and 
Norfolk County Comm- 



issioner, and Charles 
Mclntyre, son of the late 
Mayor-Senator James 
Mclntyre, making his first 
run for office. 

Ward 3 Councillor 
Larry Chretien will face 
Robert Boussy, a Boston 
school bus driver. 

Ward 4 Councillor Tom 
Fabrizio is challenged by 
Michael D'Amico, an 18- 
year-old college student. 

Ward councillors 
running unopposed are 
Peter Kolson (Ward 1), 
Ted DeCristofaro (Ward 
2), Charles Phelan (Ward 
5) and Bruce Ayers (Ward 
6). 

George Miller who as 
run for the city council and 
state representative in the 
past, had City Hall 
observers guessing when 
he took out nomination 
papers for both City 
Council at-large and Ward 
2 on Friday. But he failed 
to file either Tuesday. 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Another Shaw's 
Supermarket is not needed 
in Quincy, according to 
the majority of residents 
who attended a public 
hearing at City Hall 
MoiMlay night. 

Members of the City 
Council and Planning 
Board held the hearing to 
allow residents to voice 
their opinions on the 
supermarket's proposal to 
build a new store at the 
site of the old Boston Gear 
Works, 10 Hayward St. 
and 477-479 Hancock St. 
in Wollaston. 

Twelve people spoke 
against the proposal at the 
hearing and 26 signed in 
opposition. One spoke in 
favor and 12 were recorded 
as being for the proposed 
supermarket. 

The company, which 
already has a supermarket 
on Quincy Ave. just south 
of Quincy Center, requires 
a special granting permit 
from the City Council to 
build the store. 

Atty. Robert Fleming 



said Shaw's plans to use 
86,000 square feet at the 
site, including 56,000 for 
the new supermarket and 
30,000 for "another user" 
such as a women's 
clothing store, drug store, 
or another kind of retail 
store. The 160,000 square 
foot Boston Gear facility 
will be demolished, he 
said. 

Traffic signals in the 
area would be changed 
and updated, and 
additional improvements 
such as road and sidewalk 
repairs are also part of the 
plan, according to 
Fleming. In addition, the 
new store would result in 
200 construction jobs, 250 
full-time and part-time and 
positions at the 
supermarket, and an 
increase in the tax base, 
he said. 

Charles D'Aprix, 
executive director of 
Quincy 2000, the city's 
public-private planning 
corporation, spoke in favor 
the proposal. 

"From a planning point 



of view, and from an 
economic development 
point of view, this is a 
good plan," said D'Aprix. 
"We (at Quincy 2000) 
have taken all into 
consideration, and we are 
four-square behind this 
project." 

Most in attendance, 
however, were adamant in 
their opposition to the 
proposed supermarket, 
citing traffic and pollution 
as among their major 
concerns. 

"I don't see how this 
street can handle that kind 
of traffic," said Bob 
Pacino, owner of nearby 
Bob's Speed and Auto 
Parts, who added that 
Shaw's proposed 

elimination of around 20 
nearby parking spots could 
seriously jeopardize his 
own establishment. 

"Without the paricing, 1 
wouldn't be able to 
operate," he said. "If this 
goes through I would be 
Uterally out of business." 

Arlene Tenney of 55 

(Cont'd On Page 2) 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursditv, July 2«>, 1*W3 



Proposed Supermarket 
Runs Into Opposition 



(Cont'd Fn>m Page I ) 

Albion Rd. expressed fears 
that her street, and others 
in the area, might become 
inundated with motorists 
looking for a quick 
shortcut out of the Shaw's 
parking lot. 

"One way in, and one 
way out--people will cut 
through the side streets," 
said Tenney. 

The plan calls for the 
store to be accessible only 
on Hancock Street, 
according to Fleming and 
several Shaw's officials in 
attendance. Trucks would 
load at the rear of the 
store, they said. 

Vincent Palmisano of 
476 Hancock St. said he 
already has problems with 
fumes from existing traffic 
and a supermarket would 
just make matters worse. 



"1 live with carbon 
monoxide (already)," he 
said. "1 don't want Shaw's 
across the street from me." 

Marie McHugh of 6 
Marlboro St. said she 
simply likes her 
neighborhood the way it is 
and a large supermarket is 
not welcome there. 

"We want our 
neighborhood to stay the 
same," she said. "You are 
not shoving Shaw's or 
anything else in our 
throats." 

McHugh, who noted 
that her feelings are 
nothing personal against 
Shaw's, added that she 
was upset that she had 
received nothing in the 
mail about the public 
hearing and had only heard 
about it earlier that day. 

Council President 
Charles Phelan, whose 



ward (Ward 5) includes 
part of the site, said two 
community meetings had 
already been held on the 
subject and that 
notification of the hearing 
had been given to all of 
the city's media sources. 
He added that while area 
households had also been 
mailed notification, he 
would see to it in the 
future that more of the 
neighborhood's streets be 
included in the mailing 
process. 

Ward 6 Councillor 
Bruce Ayers, whose ward 
also includes part of the 
site, agreed. Both Phelan 
and Ayers said more 
community meetings 
would be held in the future 
before the City Council 
takes any action on the 
project. 



Deli Closing Hour 
Extension Denied 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

A request from 
Montctair Deh, 218 West 
Squantum St. to extend its 
closing time one hour 
Monday through Saturday 
nights was denied Tuesday 
by the Quincy License 
Board. 

Building Inspector 
Matthias Mulvey said he 



could not vote for owner 
William Oliver's request 
for a 10 p.m. closing time 
because Oliver had 
violated the law by 
placing signage along the 
sidewalk and elsewhere 
near the establishment 
without the proper permits. 
"If you don't have 
permits for the signage. 



S. s. 




P^^^ 



^ ^ 



Illusions/^ 



Off*ring N«w Produdts, Services, People and Perspective 

Senior Citizens Day 

Tuesday's Only 
From 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

with Matthew Only 

Perms $35 w/ cut $40 
Colors $25 w/cut $30 

Cuts & Style $15 
All Include blowdrys. 

Call 770-0610 
15 School Street, Quincy 



you can't use it," said 
Mulvey. "I have no 
inclination to vote for a 
change of hours. I make a 
motion to keep the hours 
the same, and if the laws 
are not complied to, I will 
ask for a hearing for the 
possible suspension or 
revocation of your 
license." 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman said the 
establishment could 
probably survive 

financially with being 
open one extra hour a 
night 

"Nine o'clock (the 
current closing time) is a 
very fair hour," said 
Goimart 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



FLY TO 
CAPE COD 
BY BOAT! 

Back by popular demand - 
our 2-1/2 hour cruise 
to Provincetown! 

Fly by the highways and bridges. 
This is the fastest, most fun way 
to the tip of Cape Cod! 

Spend 4 hours exploring the sights, 
shops, and streetside eateries. You can 
even explore the sand dunes, or climb the 
Pilgrim Monument and see back to Boston' 

After your fun-filled day, relax with a 
cocktail on your cruise back as we watch 
the sun set over the Boston skyline. 

Sailing from Bay Polnte Marina In Quincy, 
•very Wednesday & Thursday, June 23- 
Sept. 2. Departs at 9, returns at 6:30. Kids 
age 8 and under go free. 

617*770»1008 



^^'""r^ 



' Quincy to 

• Provincetown 

BOAT EXPRESS 



Most trips sell out — 
reservations are necessary 



King Will Not Seek Re-election 
To School Committee 



Margaret "Peggy" King 
announced Tuesday that 
she will not seek re- 
election to the Quincy 
School Conmiittee. 

Instead, King, a fomicr 
school teacher, said she 
will resume her retirement. 

"My term has been a 
challenge and an exciting 
experience I would not 
have wanted to miss. 1 
have enjoyed working with 
such hard-working 
colleagues on the 
committee who made 
things move even though 
the hours were late at 
times. No gridlock with 
us," King said. 

"Having been involved 
for a long time in the 
Quincy Public Schools and 
having been through the 
sad days when schools 
were closed and when we 
lost so many fine teachers 
in the aftermath of 
(Proposition) 21/2, it has 
been wonderful to be part 
of a committee which is 
building a new school, an 
addition, and getting ready 
to bring back two closed 
schools and a new gym for 
Parker. 

"Best of all, it has been 
a happy experience to be 
part of the rebuilding of 
our professional staff. A 
highlight was the hiring of 
Eugene Creedon as 
superintendent, one of my 
goals. 

"Under many difficult 
circumstances at times, 
and now under the new Ed 
Reform Act, I support him 
wholeheartedly. His 
recent report on the 
schools is an excellent 
example of his leadership 
in a contentious area. 

"1 am proud to have 
been involved in the 
successful negotiations 




PEGGY KING 

with our deserving and 
dedicated teachers and 
other school personnel, 
and to have approved a 
budget which, through the 
efforts of the mayor, 
contained a significant 
increase over the previous 
year. 

The support of the 
mayor and the council on 
a bond issue containing 
money for recommended 
school maintenance 
improvements was a very 
significant movement 
toward restoring proper 
maintenance of our 
schools. My goal for more 
publicity about the great 
things going on in our 
schools is coming to 
fruition as witnessed by 
agenda items. 

"My goal concerning 
the revitalization of the 
Vocational Education 
Program is yet to be fiilly 
realized. However, the 
Tech Prep programs 
already in the works, under 
the recently retired 
director Joseph Mazzarella 
and Emily Ostrower proved 
a big impetus. Under our 
new director, Dr. Avery, 
who has spent her career 
in the area of vocational 
education, I expect great 



forward movement. 

"The elimination of the 
so-called "general 
education" track at the 
high school is a very good 
educational change. Now, 
students certainly by 
Grade 9 will have a 
definite goal for deciding 
on an educational program 
for their future, but which 
will allow movement if a 
change is desired. As the 
(Quincy) College, I 
believe we are on the way 
to remedying that 
situation. 

"After 44 years of 
working and at age 75, 1 
do think it's time to get 
back to the retired life. 1 
left to take on the School 
Committee position. 1 
want to resume travelling 
(Antarctica is first on my 
list), reading other than 
School Committee reports, 
playing golf and tennis 
regularly and enjoying my 
Florida home for at least 
four months of the year. 

"I have kept my 
promise to give up many 
things in order to do my 
job well, to attend every 
regular meeting, 

negotiation session and 
subcommittee meeting. 
Until my term is up I will 
continue to work just as 
hard. I will look carefully 
at prospective candidates 
to judge whom I will 
support. 

"Rest assured, that 
even after January, I will 
continue to be an advocate 
for education and will 
continue to write "Letters 
to the Editor" and lobby 
legislators. The Ed 
Reform Act is a begirming 
but changes need to be 
made," King said, adding 
she will miss her 
colleagues and thanks 
them for their support. 



North Quincy Garage 
Shut Down By Board 



Located 3/4 mile north of the fore River Bridge off Rt 3A 
Bay Pointe Marina, Washington Court, Quincy 




By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Coletta Bros., Inc., 270 
Hancock St. was shut 
down Tuesday by the 
Quincy License Board. 

The board ordered the 
establishment closed 
because of refusal to pay 
real estate taxes and 
operation without a valid 
license. 

City Tax Collector 
Dana Childs said the 
company owes the city in 
excess of $30,000 in real 
estate taxes. Childs added 
that ownership had agreed 



in January to a payment 
plan through which the 
company could repay its 
debt but has not lived up 
to its end of the bargain. 

"They agreed to make 
payments of about $4,800 
a month," said Childs. 
"They made one payment 
of about $3,000, and that 
was it." 

Board members also 
said it had come to their 
attention that that the 
establishment has not 
renewed its 

Gasoline/Repair License 



since 1989 and therefore 
has been operating 
illegally. In addition. 
Building Inspector 
Matthias MuWey said 
there were several building 
code violations at the site. 

Fire Chief Thomas 
Gorman made a motion 
that the establishment be 
closed immediately and 
that the Law Department 
put in writing the reasons 
for the shutdown. 

No one from Coletta 
Bros, was in attendance at 
the meeting. 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Eddie's Diner Fire 
Under Investigation 



By JENNIFER 
WEITZMAN 

Of f ici als are 

investigating the cause of 
a fire early Monday which 
severely damaged Eddie's 
Diner, the landmark all- 
night restaurant. 

The two- alarm blaze 
forced the diner to close 
for at least three or four 
months, possibly forever. 

After talking with 
adjusters on Monday, Fire 
Chief Thomas Gorman 
estimated the damage at 
about $325,000. This 
includes $225,000 to cover 
the cost to the building 
and $100,000 worth of 
equipment. 

The state fire marshal's 
office is continuing its 
investigation to determine 
what caused the diner to 
go up in flames. 

Lucille Ciani of 
Brockton, who owns the 
land that the diner sits on 
and Eddie's Motor Inn 
located next to the diner 
said the fire was 
devastating. 

Gorman said Nick 



Katsoulis of Braintree, 
who has owned the diner 
with his wife Nellie for 
more than a decade, 
indicated he will not 
reopen the diner. 

"Katsoulis and the 
landlord could not reach 
an agreement," Gorman 
said, adding that in order 
for it to reopen, it would 
cost too much money. 

Gorman said Katsoulis 
would have to do 
extensive remodeling work 
to the diner to bring a new 
restaurant up to new 
codes, such as making it 
handicapped accessible. 

Over the years, the 
diner's business has been 
slow. Quincy once had five 
or six diners--one in 
Wollaston, the Pilgrim 
Diner across from Shaw's, 
the Mayflower Diner on 
Southern Artery and 
another Mayflower Diner 
on Hancock Street in 
North Quincy. The only 
operating diner is the 
Wheelhouse Diner on 
Hancock Street in North 
Quincy, but it is not open 



all night. 

Gorman says people's 
eating habits have 
changed. Since the fast 
food restaurant and drive- 
up window businesses 
picked up in the early 80s, 
people have stopped 
coming to diners. 

"People are more run 
and go today," be said. 

The fire chief noted 
Katsoulis has been looking 
to sell Eddie's. 

Eddie's, at the comer of 
Quincy Avenue and 
Southern Artery, opened in 
1942. It was a favorite spot 
for late-night pers, where 
customers would go after a 
movie, slid into their red 
upholstered booths to have 
a cup of coffee with some 
friends. 

Gorman, who used to 
frequent the diner, said it 
was a very sociable place 
to go. "If you wanted to 
find someone, just go to 
Eddie's early in the 
morning. Everybody was 
there. 

"A part of history 
gone," Gonnan said. 




LANDMARK GUTTED- Workman boards up the gutted shell of Eddie's Diner at the 
corner of Quincy Ave. and Southern Artery, the scene of a two-alarm Tire early 
Monday. The fire is under investigation. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Bar Gets Warning 
On Closing Regulations 



IS 



Lt. Col. Judith Rand Comptroller 
In Provide Promise Task Force 



Lt. Col. Judith Rand of 
Quincy is helping the 
United Nations get 
critically-needed 
humanitarian relief 
supplies to people in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina. 

A 1969 graduate of 
Quincy High School, Rand 
is a resource management- 
finance officer normally 
assigned to the 266th 
Theater Finance 

Command, Heidelberg, 
Germany. Currently, she is 



the comptroller for the U.S. 
Joint Task Force Provide 
Promise in Naples, Italy, 
which is responsible for 
getting food and medicine 
into the region through 
airlift flights into Sarajevo 
and airdrop flights over 
towns in Bosnia- 
Herzegovina. 

Rand is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen W. 
Rand and has been in the 
Army for 18 years. 

"I am extremely proud 



of Colonel Rand and all 
members of the Joint Task 

Force," said Adm. Mike 
Boorda, commander of the 
Joint Task Force. "They 

have all responded 
magnificently to our 
emergency, humanitarian 
efforts in Provide 
Promise." 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The Quincy License 
Board Tuesday issued a 
written warning to Nally's, 
35 Washington St. for 
violating rules and 
regulations regarding the 
establishment's closing 
guidelines. 

Det. Sgt. Richard 
Laracy, the city's liquor 
inspector, said the 
guidelines require all 
drinks to be off the bar at 
1:15 a.m., all customers to 
be off the premises at 1:30 
a.m. and all employees to 
be off the premises at 2 
a.m. unless they are 
cleaning. 

Laracy said he has 
received a number of 
complaints from Officei 
Joseph O'Rielly tha> 
Nally's has violated these 
guidelines. 

O'Rielly testified before 



the board that he has found 
Nally's employees inside 
the bar "four or five times" 
past the appointed time, 
including one occasion at 
almost 4 a.m. O'Rielly 
said he had given those in 
the bar a verbal warning 
prior to the most recent 
violation. 

James Nally, the bar's 
manager, said he has 
"tried to comply" with all 
rules and regulations and 
added that he personally 
was never on the premises 
at the times of the 
violations. 

Laracy agreed that 



Nally was not to blame for 
the situation. 

"He (Nally) has been 
quite cooperative," said 
Laracy. 

Because of Nally's 
agreement to ensure all 
rules and regulations will 
be followed in the future, 
Police Chief Francis 
Mullen ruled that only a 
written warning would be 
necessary. 

Save Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 




BUYU.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



Delivers Balloons 




690 Hancock 



7730690 



Quincy 







HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

"It's not just 'Purdy' good, 
it's the lyest" 

Everything made on premises 

68A Billings Road 
N. Quincy MA 

472-8558 



il 






MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 




Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door with personal- 
ized, measurable adverti- 
sing to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usually by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood. We tell them all 
about your business. 
Interested"!" Call tor more 
details. 

Barbara Nawrot Mendflz 
479-2587 

■ O" ' 



WEIGHT TO LOSE??? 
NO NEED TO WAIT!!! 



ALL NATURAL, SAFE & EFFECTIVE 

100% GUARANTEED 

Only 2 simple easy steps to follow. 

"/ know the program works! 

I lost 33-1/2 lbs. in only 13 weeks." 

Nonnan 

"/ have tried many diets and this is the only 

one that has worked for me. 1 lost 49 lbs. 

in only 17 weeks. 1 am so elated." 
Karen 

WE»RE OUT TO CHANGE 
THE SHAPE OF THE WORLD 

Mail Orders Accepted 

NORMAN I. NISENBAUM, B.S. 

Registered Pharmacist 

215 Samoset Ave.-Quincy, MA 02169 

CALL (617) 471-1963 



Wete making 

a difference in 

Quincy 



At Fleet Bank, we're working hard to make a positive 

difference in the way you bank. After all, we're a different kind of bank. 

Backed by all the resources of the Fleet Financial Group, we're able to 

offer you the kind of innovative products and services you need today. 

Like our low rate home equity loan and money-saving credit card offers. 

So stop in soon and find out how we can make a difference for you. 



J^ 



Fleet Bank 

.\ Mcmhc'l ! !cct I inji\ u! ( 'rnmp 

We're here to make a difference: 

52] Southern Artery 

U'>2 Hancock Street 

20 Beale Street. WoHiistoi! 



Mcmk-r I'DIC 



t=) 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2«>, l*>*^^ 



OPINION 



^%vi.±xa.c3r 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co inc 

1372 Hancock St Qumcy Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr Publisher 
Robert H Bosworth Editor 



30C p«r copy. $12.00 per yaar by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outside Quincy $17 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 <.71-3i02 
Second class postage paid at Boston Mass 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun 1372 Hancock St Qumcy Mass 02169 



The Qumcy Sun assumes nt: financial responsit iily lof 
typographica' errors m advertisements but *iil lepnni iMal 
pan of an a>1verisemen| m whicn me typographical error 
occurs 



'A<^»' 



License Board Briefs 



The Quincy License 
Board took the following 
action at its meeting 
Tuesday: 

•Granted a request from 
Hancock Tobacco Inc., 
1500 Hancock St. 
(Florence McCardle) for a 
Common Victualer-Wine 
and Malt License. 

•Granted a request from 
Cravings, 170 Washington 
St. (Chris Notarangelo) for 
permission to transfer their 
Common Victualer 
License to 1585 Hancock 
St. 

•Granted a request from 
The Tent, Marina Bay 
(Rich Barrett) for an 
extension of premises to 
hold a picnic fundraiser 
with live entertainment for 
age 21 and over Sunday, 
Aug. 22 from 1 to 6 p.m. 
The event will benefit The 
Genesis Fund and Quincy 
Pohce Action League. 

•Granted a request from 
Supreme Pizza, 271 
Quincy Ave. for a change 
of managers. 

•Continued a hearing 
regarding Joe's Pub & 
Grub, 132 East Howard St. 



(Joseph Hajjar) and 
complaints received by the 
Police Department from 
neighbors of the 
establishment. 

•Postponed a request 
from Apple Auto Body of 
Quincy, Inc., 60 Beale St 
(John Mclntyre) fron a 
transfer of the Motor 1 
License from C.A. Cox 
Automotive, Inc., 60 Beale 
St. 

•Granted a request from 
Stop & Stop Supermarket 
Co. (Nina Atkinson) for a 
one day permit to hold 
their annual "Hot Dog 
Day" fundraiser for the 
Quincy Crisis Center 
Friday, Aug. 27 in front of 
the Stop & Shop 
Company's Quincy Center 
Plaza offices. 

•Granted a request from 
Special Effects Jewelry 
Co., 32 Copeland St. 
(Jennifer Seamans- 
Johnson) for an Old Gold 
and Silver Licen.se. 

•Postponed a request 
from Cafe Expresso, 100 
Granite St. for a Common 
Victualer License. 



Medically 
Speaking 



by mchaelM. Bakerman. M.D., FA.C.C. 




THE UPS AND DOWNS 

Don't believe every- 
thing you read, even on 
the trusted family ther- 
mometer. That little red 
"normal" line parked at 98.6 
may or may not indicate 
your optimum healthy body 
temperature. In fact, a re- 
cent study of U.S. adults 
found that only eight per- 
cent of healthy tempera- 
tures registered at 98.6 
degrees Fahrenheit. In the 
study of 1 48 subjects, who 
were checked a total of 
more than 700 times, 
"normar was anywhere 
from 96 to 99.9 degrees. 
The thing to remember 
through all the number- 
crunching and data-taking 
is that everyone has a 
normal temperature range 
which varies slightly due to 
personal and environmen- 
tal factors. A thermometer 
reading of a degree or so 
above or below 98.6 should 
not be a cause for alarm. 
P.S. The traditional nor- 



OFTEKC>ERATURE 

mal reading of 98.6 de- 
grees was so designated 
in 1868 by a German 
doctor named Carl 
Wunderiich. 

If your usual tempera- 
ture is two degrees below 
normal, a reading of 98.6 
would indicate tfiat you 
are feverish, if you would 
like to learn more about 
this topic, or about how 
you can help prevent heart 
disease, call COMPRE- 
HENSIVE CARDIAC 
CARE at 472-2550. When 
treating patients, 1 always 
tryto consider how Iwould 
like myself, my wife and 
children or my parents to 
be treated by a doctor. 
Office hours are by ap- 
pointment, and our new, 
more comfortable office 
is located in Crown 
Colony, 700 Congress St, 
Suite 2C, in Quincy. I am 
affiliated with Quincy 
Hospital and South Shore 
Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By HtMiry Bo.swoith 



But What If...! 




For City Building Inspector Matt Mulvey it was 
a classic case of damned-if- 
you-do and damned-if-you- 
don't. 

Mulvey can be pretty tough when it 
comes to enforcing building depart- 
ment regulations. He doesn't look the 
other way when he finds a code vio- 
lation. MULVEY 

But if he is tough, he is also fair. And he plays no 
favorites. 

Even his own grandmother, would have a problem 
getting a permit or license if everything wasn't up to 
snuff. 

So, it wasn't a surprise to those who really know 
Mulvey when he refused to let the show go on at Marina 
Bay last week. 

He immediately became the villain of the week — 
maybe the year — in the eyes of some parents who had 
already bought tickets to take their children to the Great 
American Circus. 

And in the eyes of some of the disappointed 
youngsters, Mulvey was a bigger meanie than Scrooge, 
t he Grinch that stole Christmas and the Wicked Witch 
of the West all rolled into one. 

Mulvey said he refused to let the perfoimance go on 
because the circus "had substandard wiring and sub- 
standard seating." 

He said the circus was using saw-horses to support 
some of the 2,500 seats and had left wiring exposed that 
created a fire hazard. 

On top of that, he said, the circus did not have 
emergency lighting. So, if there had been a fire and the 
power was knocked out the crowd could have been left 
in the dark with panic and potential disaster in the 
making. 

The disappointment to the parents and the yoimgsters 
is imderstandable. 

But some of the comments were a bit hard to 
understand. 

"Doesn't the building inspector have kids," one 
grandfather wanted to know. 

I've got two kids and I love the circus," Mulvey 
responded. 

"I'm disgusted," said a mother. "We lookedforward 
this all week. Look at all these kids. They're dis- 
appointed." 

There must have been a lot of disappointment. 

But what if..? 

What if Mulvey had allowed the show to go on and 
the seats collapsed or there was a fire? It could have 
been a tragedy. 

Meeting On Wetland 
Protection Ordinance Aug. 4 



The Quincy Planning 
Department and 

Conservation Commission 
are sponsoring an evening 
with environmental 

attorney, Gregor 

MacGregor, who will 
explain enforcement of the 



local Wetlands Protection 
Ordinance. 

The meeting is open to 
the public, and free of 
charge, and will be held 
Wednesday, Aug. 4, from 
7 to 9 p.m. in the Second 
Floor Conference Room, 
City Hall Annex. 



Ward 2 Democrats 
To Hold Caucus Aug. 3 



The Ward 2 Democratic 
Committee will hold a 
caucus Tuesday, Aug. 3 at 
7 p.m. at the Fore River 
Clubhouse, 16 Nevada 
Rd., Quincy. 

The caucus is open to 
all Democrats who reside 
in Ward 2 and have been a 



member of the Democratic 
Party since Jan. 1, 1993. 
Eleven delegates will be 
elected to the issues 
convention to be held in 
Worcester Oct. 16. 

The committee 

encourages all interested 
Democrats to attend. 




KING 



And if it had happened these disappointed parents 
luid others would be after Mulvey 's hide. 
We can hear the cries now: 
"Why did you let the show go on!. .."You were 
derelict in your duties".. ."You iue responsible for this 
tragedy". .."How can you sleep nights!".. .etc., etc. 

The circus was allowed to play in Whitman the 
following night. But only after inspectors were satis- 
fied the circus had made the needed changes — using 
sturdier bleachers and keeping electrical wiring from 
being exposed. 

Instead of jeers, Mulvey would seem to deserve a 
few cheers for standing by his guns. 

A tragedy didn't happen in Quincy or Whitman. But 
it could have. 

□ 

PEGGYKING'S DECISION 
not to seek re-election to the School 
Committee came as no big surprise. 
When she took out nomina- 
tion papers she said she was not sure 
that she would file them. 

She is 75 and to nm and win 
would be a fom^ year commitment. (The term is four 
years.) 

"I'm no Frank Anselmo," she mused. 
Anselmo was 93 when he ran for the School Com- 
mittee for the last time two years ago after begirming 
his political career at age 62 when most people are 
thinking of retiring. 
King says she will continue to be an active advocate 

for good education. 

□ 

MARTIN ERVIN, who dropped out of the mayor's 
race, is still pm suing one of his pet goals: creation of a 
youth center. 

Ervin reports he met recently with Police Chief 
Francis Mullen and Tom Koch, executive secretary to 
Mayor James Sheets, to discuss the possibility and will 
meet Aug. 5 with a representative from Senator Ed- 
ward Kennedy's office. 

Financing and location seem to be the two biggest 
questions. 

Ervin says if public fimds — city, state or federal — 
are not available, he may seek private support and run 
the operation himself. 

Ervin, who was living in Quincy Point and feuding 
with his landlord, is moving to Arthur St. in West 
Quincy where he formerly lived. 

He says he definitely will be back on the political 
scene for the 1995 city election and will run for mayor 
again. And this time stay in the race. 

"This year," he says,"was not the right time to run 
for mayor." 

And there are bigger political names than his that 
will agree with him considering Sheets' popularity. 

□ 

MURIEL McKENZIE, long-time Patriot Udger 
reporter, is ill at her Squantum home. One of the city's 
most respected journalists, she is also one of those real 
nice persons the world should have more of. 

You might like to cheer Muriel with a little card. Her 
address is: 18 Sunrise Rd., North Quincy, MA 02171. 

□ 

A CAMPAIGN KICKOFF fundraiser for Mary 
Collins, City Council at-large candidate, will be held 
tonight (Thursday) from 7 to 10 p.m. at Coddington's, 
Quincy Sq. Tickets are $10. 

□ 

A CAMPAIGN RECEPTION for Michael D ' Amico, 
candidate for the Ward 4 City Council seat, is set for 
Wednesday, Aug. 1 8 at 7 p.m. at the Common Market, 
Willard St., West Quincy. Tickets arc $15 and will be 
available at the door. 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Sister Regina Harrington Leaving 
Our Lady On Year Sabbatical 



Sister Regina 

Harrington, CSJ, will 
leave Our Lady of Good 
Counsel Church Sunday 
for a Sabbatical year. 

Sister Regina, who has 
served 13 years at the 
Church, the last nine as 
Pastoral Associate, will 
spend the first part of the 
year in a retreat-study 
program at Mercy Center, 
Madison, Conn. 

"We are really going to 
miss her," said Rev. James 
Curtin, pastor. "She has 
been like a right arm to 
me. She has been so 
helpful in so many ways." 

Sister Regina in 
January will attend 
Weston School of 
Theology in Cambridge 
and take part in the 
Sabbatical Program to 
prepare for another 
assignment in the 
Archdiocese. 

"I am really going to 
miss Fr. Curtin, the 
parishioners of Our Lady 
and Quincy," she said. "It 
has been 13 happy years 
for me." 

Sister Regina came to 
Our Lady of Good Counsel 
as Director of Religious 
Education and served in 
that position for four years 
before becoming Pastoral 
Associate. 



The role of the Pastoral 
Associate evolved from 
the parish becoming a 
"one priest parish", a role 
that has become quite 
common throughout the 
country. 

As Pastoral Associate, 
she was involved in all 
phases of parish life 
including the Parish 
Pastoral Council, 
Confirmation program. 
Liturgy Committee, 
Baptismal preparation. 
Pastoral Care and laison 
with the Merry Shore 
Senior Citizens. 

She has taken numerous 
courses and attended 
seminars to keep updated 
on constantly changing 
parish activity. 

"It has been extremely 
interesting and challenging 
to be part of the parish at 
this time." 

An Appreciation Day 
for her was held recently 
at the church. 

Mass was celebrated by 
Fr. Curtin with Rev. Peter 
Martocchio, former pastor, 
and Rev. Msgr. William 
Shea concelebrants. 

A reception was held in 
the Parish Hall attended 
by parishioners and city 
and state officials. 

Citations were 

presented to her by City 




SISTER REGINA HARRINGTON, pastoral associate, who 
is leaving Our Lady of Good Counsel Church Sunday on 
a sabbatical year after 13 years of service there, bids 
farewell to Rev. James Curtin, pastor. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



The 



Red Cross Offering 
Courses in August 

American Red Aug. 30, 6-10 p.m. 



Cross at 85 Quincy Ave. 
offers 10 coursed during 
Aug. 

They are: 

Infant & child CPR, 
Tuesday, Aug. 3, 10, 6-10 
pjn. 

Standard First Aid, 
Wednesday, Aug., 4, 11, 
6-10 p.m. 

Community CPR, 
Thursday, Aug. 5,12, 6-10 
p.m. 

Stand. 1st. aid program, 
Monday, Aug. 9, 6-10 p.m. 

Mass child care, 
Saturday, Aug. 14, 9 a.m. - 
5:30 p.m. 

Community CPR, 
Tuesday, Aug. 17, 24, 6-10 
p.m. 

Mass child care 
progression, Wednesday, 
Aug. 18,6-lOp.m. 

Standard first aid, 
Thursday, Aug. 19, 26, 6- 
10 p.m. 

Community CPR, 
Saturday, Aug. 28, 9 a.m. - 
5 p.m. 

Adult CPT, Tuesday, 

Children's 

Academics 

At Beechwood 

Summertime 
Academics began Monday 
at the Beechwood 
Community Life Center, 
225 Fenno St., Wollaston. 

The classes are for 
children entering Grades 1- 
3 and 4-6. Students are 
given the opportunity to 
maintain and enhance 
reading and math skills 
during the summer months. 

Individual tutoring is 
also available at 
Beechwood. For more 
information or registration 
call 471-5712. 



Councillors Peter Kolson 
and Michael Cheney, 
Senator Michael Morrissey 
and Rep. Steve Tobin. 
Former Senator Paul 
Harold also attended. 

Later the same day, 
members of the Parish 
Community surprised her 
with another reception and 
"roast. 



The committee for that 
reception, chaired by 
Barbara Keddy, included 
Roseann Flavin, Doreen 
Burke, Debbie Nigro, 
Betty Mafera, Dolly Shea, 
Nancy Pitts, Ellen Savage, 
Eleanor Flibotte, Joan 
Perrow, Margaret Reilly, 
Maureen Rose and Jeanne 
Reardon. 



ATTENTION QUINCY RESIDENTS!! 

HOUSING REHABILITATION GRANTS 
AND LOW INTEREST LOANS 

HOUSING REHABILITATION AND DELEADING GRANT PROGRAM: 

• To eliminate substandard living conditions 

• Open to homeowners who meet low-income guidelines 

• Grants up to $10,000 for single family units; $15,000 for multi- 

family units 
HOUSING REHABILITATION LOAN PROGRAM: 

• To eliminate substandard living conditions 

• Open to homeowners meeting moderate income guidelines 

• 5% Loans of up to $10,000 for single family units and $20,000 for 
multi-family imits 

• Flexible terms of up to 15 years 
DELEADING LOAN PROGRAM: 

• To prevent lead paint poisoning of yoimg children 

• No income limits 

• 5% and 7% Loans 

• Owner occupied or rental housing 

• Free lead inspections and re-inspections after deleading 
HANDICAPPED HOME ADAPTION PROGRAM: 

• Adapts a residence to the needs of the handicapped 

• Handicapped ramps, porchlifts, elevators, bathroom adaptions, etc... 

• Open to low-moderate income households with a handicapped resident 
Other FREE Services Include: 

• Work write-ups 

• Bidding/selection of contractor (to protect you from unscrupulous 

contractors) 

• Preparation of contractor agreement 

• Construction supervision, and more! 

Certain resuictions apply. First come, fu-st served! 
For more information contact: 
OFFICE OF HOUSING REHABILITATION 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 
1305 Hancock Street, 3rd Floor (Old City Hall) 
QUINCY JVIA 02169 
Telephone: 376-1050 / 376-1055 
nRST TIME BUYERS PROGRAMS: 
The City also offers several subsidy programs to help first time homebuyers. 

For more information on elegibility and other requirements, call: 
Sandra Brant 

Department of Planning and Community Development 
1305 Hancock Street, 3rd Floor (New City Hall) 
Telephone: 376-1366 



tOUAlHOUSMS 



Quincy's 
Yesterdays 

Kids* Playground 

Fun Curtailed 

By WPA 'Vacations' 

Ten experienced playgroimd instructors were dis- 
missed under a new Works Progress Administration 
(WPA) rule that required workers employed for more 
than 1 8 months to be given 

30 days unpaid vacation -,»-,«.»«»,«,««.,,„>««„,_ 
before Sept. 1. 



July 29.Aug. 4 

1939 
54 Years Ago 



Franklin B. Mitchell, 
longtime supervisor of 
playground activities, said 
the city's summer play ' " 
programs for thousands of children will be crippled 
unless someone comes up with a plan for immediate 
relief. 

Mitchell said he may appeal to the City Council for 
a special emergency appropriation to pay the key 
instructors needed for the city's 21 playgrounds. The 
WPA workers supplemented the 24 girls who were 
paid by the city. 

NEW COURT HOURS FOUGHT 

Members of the Quincy Bar Association voted their 
opposition to plan to open Quincy District Court at 9 
a.m. instead of 9: 30 a.m. President George W. Arbuckle 
said the vote was scheduled for 9 a.m. but most mem- 
bers did not show up until 9:20 a.m. 

QUINCY-ISMS 

Col. Clarence Hodge of Quincy lost his $2,760 job 
as head of the Aviation Division in a reorganization of 
the State Dept. of Public Works . . . Elinor Knight, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Knight of Dorchester 
St., Squanttmi, was the first to pass the new Red Cross 
advanced swimmers life saving tests at the Dorchester 
St. Beach...Spam was 5 cents for a 12 once can at the 
Stop & Shop on Southern Artery across from the police 
station . . . City Councillor Christian A. Burkhard 
welcomed 250 members of National Old Age Pen- 
sions, Inc., to their picnic at Squaw Rock . . . "Artists 
and Models Abroad," starring Jack Beimy and Joan 
Beimett, and "North of Shanghai," with James Craig 
and Betty Fumess, was playmg at the State Theater 
along with Chapter 6 of "The Lone Ranger Rides 
Again" . . . Simon Swig, once the owner of controversial 
Swig's Dance Hall on Wollaston Beach across from the 
yacht clubs, died at 76 at his Taunton home . . . The 
businessman's lunch of roast fresh shoulder, mashed 
potatoes, squash, rolls and butter was 35 cents at the 
Howard Johnson restaurant in the Granite Trust Build- 
ing ... A bicycle owned by Bernard Reisberg of 55 
Grafton St., Quincy Point was reported stolen on 
Hancock St. . . . Timothy Daley, a cousin of Boston 
Mayor Maurice Tobin and a candidate for the City 
Council from Ward 4, found three rattlesnakes while 
picking blueberries in the Blue Hills . . . The State 
Health Department, in a letter to Health Commissioner 
Dr. Richard Ash, recommended construction of a bath 
house and toilet facilities at Avalon Beach . . . Richmond 
coffee was two pounds for 29 cents at the First National 
Store, 42 Beale St., Wollaston . . . John P. Mansfield, 

18, of 45 Sharon Rd., Atlantic, was assigned as a deck 
cadet on the SS Mormacsea, a cargo vessel sailing from 
North America ports to Scandinavia and the Baltic Sea 
. . . Ruth Gordon, the Wollaston bom actress, signed to 
play the role of Mary Todd in the RKO movie "Abe 
Lincoln in Illinois" . . . William Rogers of 1 1 82 Sea St., 
Houghs Neck, narrowly escaped death when a three- 
room cottage he was building at 61 Winthrop St. 
collapsed on him . . . General Manager Leo Kopel 
hosted the annual outing for more than 55 employees of 
the Kincaide Furniture Co. at Robbins Pond in East 
Bridgewater. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thurjday, July 29, 1993 




Marie's 
Eatchen 

By MARIE J. D'OUMPIO 



Peach Pie 



After baking many people apple pies, 
a friend who has a fruit market gave me 
so many peaches, that I actually baked 
my first peach pie. It was so simple arKl 
came out almost perfect the first time, 
that I have been baking them more often 
than apple. 

It is delicious served with freshly 
whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. It's 
also cuts better if made ahead of time 
and refrigerated, although around this 
house, that rarely happens. And these 
weeks, peaches are at an abundance and 
on sale in some markets. 
Peach Pie 

8 large peaches 

1 cup sugar 



2 tablespoons corn starch 
a smidgen of cinnamon and 
nutmeg 

Peel and cut in slices. Place in large 
bowl and add the rest of the ingredients 
blending it well. I have to confess that I 
have been using the ready made pie 
crusts because I bake at least three pies 
a week plus the fact that they are pretty 
close to home made. So having said 
that, place the bottom crust on a nine 
inch pie plate. Put the peaches in that 
and then top it off with a top crust. I 
brush the top with an egg mixture, and 
also use an egg substitute. Bake in a 
preheated 450 degree oven for 15 
minutes and then 350 for 35 minutes. 



William Hahn Elected Ford Hall Forum OfTicer 

William Hahn of Hall Forum Board of Ford Hall Forum is the 

Quincy was elected vice Directors' recent annual 

president of electronic meeting. nation's oldest free public 

media projects at the Ford Based in Boston, ti 



affairs lecture series. 



Lisa Hourigan Newbury Graduate 



Lisa 
Quincy 



Hourigan 
received 



of associated in applied 
an science degree in 




ZUHAYR HEMADY. M.D. 

DIPLOMATE. AMERICAN BOARD OF ALLERGY IMMUNOLOGY 

FORMERLY 

NOBILI ALLERGY CLINIC 

ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE 

AT 

1261 FURNACE BROOK PARKWAY 

SUITE 33 

OUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 02 1 69 

PRACTICE LIMITED TO 

ALLERGY, ASTHMA. AND IMMUNOLOGY 

TELEPHONE: 472-71 1 1 



accounting, magna cum 
laude, from Newbury 
College at the college's 
recent commencement 
ceremony. 

Eileen Joyce 
On Dean's List 

Eileen T. Joyce, of 
Quincy, a Mass 
Communication/Broadcast 
Journalism student at 
Emerson College, was 
named to the Dean's List 
for the Spring academic 
semester. 

Student's receiving 
Dean's List recognition 
must earn a minimum 3.45 
grade point average for the 
semester. 

Sav« Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 




HOSPITAL AUXILURY OFFICERS, from left, Natalie Fossatti, assistant treasurer; 
Marie Wilkinson, director, three years; Janet Hassler, second vice president; Ilda 
Demascio, recording secretary; Marie McKeever, corresponding secretary; Esther 
Grossman, first vice president; Yolanda Romaneili, treasurer; and Carol Herbal, 
president. 

Quincy Hospital Auxiliary 
Elects New Officers 



The Quincy Hospital 
Auxiliary Board elected 
new officers for 1993-93 at 
its annual meeting held 
recently at the Venezia 
Restaurant. 

The new officers are: 
Carol Herbai, president; 



Esther Grossman, first vice 
president; Janet Hassler, 
second vice president; 
Yolanda Romaneili, 
treasurer; Natalie Fossati, 
assistant treasurer; Ilda 
DeMascio, recording 
secretary; Marie 

McKeever, corresponding 



secretary; Marie Wilkison, 
director, three years; 
Marion DeSantis, director, 
two years; and Mildred 
Jacobs, director, one year. 

All new officers and 
board members are 
residents of Quincy. 



New Summer Camp Sessions At Beechwood 



Mid-Summer Children's 
Camps are starting at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center, Fenno St., 
Wollaston. 

Nature Camp for ages 
3-6 aixl kid camp for ages 
elementary school age 
children. 

Camps include arts and 
crafts, music, sports, field 
trips, cook-outs, indoor and 
outdoor activities. Call for 



registration and 

information. 

Children can get ready 
for school with tutoring at 
the center. Individual and 
class tutoring is by 
credentialed teachers and 
certified special needs 
instructors. 

Science Wizardy is a 
two week camp for ages 6- 
12 and will be held on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
9-12 AM. Campers 



participate in various 
experiments, studies and a 
marsh project. 

Karaoke classes start 
two new sessions 
Wednesday, Aug. 4. 
Children's classes are 4-5 
PM and Adults/Teens are 
6-7 PM. 

Participants learn how 
to project, perform, record, 
and play a variety of 
music. 



James Tsipakis On Dean's List 



James Tsipakis of 
Quincy has been named to 
the Dean's list at the 
Massachusetts College of 



Pharmacy and Allied 
Health Sciences for the 



Tsipakis is a candidate 

for a bachelor's degree in 
pharmacy. 





spnng quarter. 

^ Thomas Kane On Dean's List 

©Thomas J. Kane of 141 
United Way Sea St.. a film student at 
I, hr.n,.n..nh,H^, ;„.»„,.. Emcrson College, was 

named to the Dean's List 
for the Spring academic 
semester. 



/( brinfis oul the bnl inill of ui. 



Students receiving 
Dean's List recognition 
must earn a minimum 3.45 

grade point average. Tom 
achieve a 3.50 average. 



RECEPTION HALLS 



■stylish 120-SEATEf 

OSCOVEREDNEAR 

MARMABAY. 

TH0U6HTT0BE 

AMELIA'S. 

The sdct's ouL 

! function room at AmeliA's| 
has become one of Boston's 
I most popular spots (or u«d 
I dings, shouwcn. corporate 
I meetings, aruj get logethcrs 
of all kinds. We feature an 
I extensive menu at affordable | 
1 prtos VJe oi«rloot( Manna 
I Bay and the Boston skyline 
We'd like to make your next 
function really (ly 

II PteasceaD 617471 1453. E 



AMELIA 



t,Victary Rd. No Quncy. Ma| 



FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON. I^ASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 



BEAUTY & SKINCAflE 




Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



(VIUSIC 






PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography 



Mci^*' 



ire's 

Studio 

679 Hancock Street. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6688 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 



JEWELRY 



(Poison Fine Jewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 
The Coletti Family A! - Dave - Mark 
730 HANCCX)K ST., WOLLASTON 02170 786-7942 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



The Quincy Sua lii|iiiiliM-|iiS'pho- 
::: tographs wltii engagement annoxincements as it 
always has. 

The Sun will also continue to use itt wedding 
announcements the names of all iK»jnbets of the 
wedding party including maid ormattoaofhoaor, 
best man, parents, bridesmaids, ashas» flower 
girls and ringbearers, etc. 

We invite engaged couples to sabnut their 
photos with their anoouncemeottLaodwlien sub- 
mitting theirwe^dingphototoindtideacomplete 
listing of the wedding pany. 

Blftde^d white photos are ptekm6* The Sun 

can eoaverttnojft color photos t0l»la«^aitd white 
for ptiblicatfoa but the photo I<jse89fl«tted«ity ki 
the process. 

We suggest that when you haveyisoireogage- 
ment photo taken, you request the studio to send a 
copy toTbe Sua with the i^minder that The Sun is 
contimting its policy of publishittg to^g^ent 
photos. 

The Sun also publishes articles and ph(Hos of 
wedding anniversaries beginning with the 25th 
anniversary. 

And, ds in Ihejpast, there is no charge. j 




LAURA SACCOCCIO 

Laura Saccoccio 
Award Winner At 
Miss Teen Pageant 



Laura Saccoccio of 
Quincy was an award 
winner at the Miss Teen of 
Massachusetts Pageant 
held recently in Worcester. 

Laura won the award for 
Outstanding Achievement 
for the 13-Year-Old 
Division, and she also 
played the keyboard during 
the talent show. 



The daughter of Mary 
Ellen and Dan Saccoccio, 
she will attend North 
Quincy High School in the 
fall. 

Theresa Nguyen of 
Worcester was crowned 
Miss Teen. Seventy-four 
girls competed in the 
pageant. 




MR. and MRS. TIMOTHY GORDON 

Nancy Pansullo Wed 
To Timothy Gordon 



City Dance Camp 
To Start Aug. 2 



Nancy M. Pansullo, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Pansullo of 
Wollaston, was recently 
married to Timothy J. 
Gordon. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Gordon 
of Pocasset. 



Recreation Director 
Barry Welch announces 
there are limited openings 
in the department's Dance 
Camp scheduled for Aug. 2 
through Aug. 6. 

The camp will be 
taught by Julie Ann 
Grover, a Patriot's 
Cheerleader for the past 
three years and director of 
"Julie Ann's Dance 
Workshop". 

Dance Camp is geared 
to the beginner through 
intermediate level with 
emphasis on routines and 
technique. Participants 



will be 



taught different celebrated at St. Ann's 

types of dance including church in Wollaston and 

comedy, jazz, co-officiated by Rev. 



Michael Carchidi of 
Pocasset, Todd Davock of 
Falmouth, and James 
Pansullo of Quincy, 
brother of the bride. 

The bride, a 1984 

graduate of Providence 

College and a 1991 

The Nuptial Mass was graduate of the University 

■ ■ ~ • of - 



tap 



Richard Crowley and 
Msgr. Eugene P. 
McNamara. A reception 
followed at the Great Hall 
in Quincy Market, Boston. 
The bride was given in 



of 



QCBPA President 
To Speak At Beechwood 



George White, 

president of the Quincy 
Center Business and 
Professional Association, 
will be guest speaker at 
the Current Events 
Breakfast Wednesday, 
Aug. 4 at 8 a.m. at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., Wollaston. 

His topic will be "The 
Changing Role of Small 
Business in Quincy." 

Beechwood's Current 
Events Breakfast meets 
monthly with speakers 
from state and local 
government and the 
business community on 
issues of interest to 
retirees and business and 



Arts & Handcrafts 



I Customer Appreeiathti 

Sale Continues 
\m%0((Evtryttkig\ 



12 Old Colony Ave.,WoUaston 



musical 

fundamental ballet, 
and choreography. 

The camp is one of the 
self-supporting summer 
programs offered by the 
Quincy Recreation 
^P^^^^^^d is for girls mania'ge brherTather 
ages 7 -12. The cost IS $30. pat^icia Steffen 
Registration is conducted Rocky River, Ohio served 
weekdays 9 a.m. through 4 as Matron of Honor, 
p.m. at 100 Southern Bridesmaids were 
Artery as long as openings Mary-Kyle Douglas of 
still exist. Additional Quinsy, Lillian Sitcawich 
information can be of West Roxbury, and 
obtained by calling 376- Elaine Swanson of 

Nashua, N.H., sister of the 
groom. 

Richard Gordon of 
Pocasset served as Best 
Man for his brother. 

Ushers were Tom 
Gordon of Monument 
Beach and Stephen 
Gordon of Milford, Conn., 
brothers of the groom; 



1386. 



professional people. The 
public is welcome. 

For more information 
and reservations call 471- 
5712. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



For Both of You... 

If you are caring for a Elihu White, our 

loved one at home, you 

know that the 

constant attention 

is difficult for 

both of you. 

The concept 

of respite 

care for a 

week's 

vacation or a 

brief time off i 

not an 



abandon- 
ment of 
your 
commit- 
ment. 
Rather, 
occa- 
sional 
respite 
care allows you to 
refresh yourself and 
gives your loved one 
continuing care and 
exposure to many 
different activities. At 




^SPITE 

(res' pit) temporary relief or 
rest in order to perform 
required tasks with greater 
effectiveness 



intimate Terrace Wing 
offers the ultimate in ac- 
conunodations— 
well appointed 
private rooms, 
excellent 
dining, and a 
professional 
staff that is 
*::^highly 

/ qualified and 
extremely 
attentive. 



Massachusetts in 
Boston, is a management 
analyst for the Office of 
the State Inspector 
General. 

The groom, a 1987 
graduate of Framingham 
State College and a 1991 
graduate of the University 
of Massachusetts in 
Boston, is an auditor for 
the Office of the State 
Auditor. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Germany and 
Switzerland, the 

newlyweds are living in 
Holbrook. 



yi^ Featuring 
,, _/ Bobby Sontag 
^^i^^huck Palmer 

Melissa Eaton 
Craig Jones & Mark Vanderwater 

specializing in weddings 

and all occasions 

Tie best djs and singing 

entertainers available 

(617) 748-8471 

FOR d.LUS OR PRIVATE PARTIES 



Russell Edward's 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 

Marie Ward Engaged 
To Paul McCabe Jr. 



Mrs. Theresa Ronayne 
of Dorchester announces 
the engagement of her 
daughter, Marie Theresa 
Ward, to Paul A. McCabe 
Jr. He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul A. McCabe of 
Quincy. 

Miss Ward graduated 
from Archbishop Williams 
High School and attended 
Northeastern University. 
She is a legal assistant at 
Gordon, Feinblatt, 



Rothman, Hoffberger & 
Hollander in Baltimore, 
Md. 

Mr. McCabe graduated 
from Boston College High 
School and received a B.S. 
degree in plastics 
engineering from the 
University of Lowell. He is 
the injection molding 
manager at Hedwin Corp. 
in Baltimore. 

An October wedding is 
ph.aned. 



^Aerobic Walk' 
At Beechwood Center 



"Aerobic Walk," a new 
summer fitness class, will 
begin a new session 
Tuesday, Aug. 3 at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., Wollaston. 

The class will meet two 
nights a week at 6:30 p.m. 
and is designed for both a 



high and a low intensity 
workout. A goal of lifelong 
health is promoted, and 
the class will work on 
cardiovascular 
conditioning and muscle 
toning. 

For more information 
caU 471-5712. 



Aerobic Dance For 
Heart Fund Saturday 



The Aerobic Annex at 
Universe Gym 31 Newport 
Ave., North Quincy will 
hold a "Dance Aerobics for 
Heart" to benefit the 
American Heart 

Association. 

It will be open to 
members as well as non- 



members Saturday from 10 
a.m. until 2 p.m. 

For more information 
call 328-7317. 

Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 
Colden Lion Suite 




Sp««k to RH« -■ th* • our rvnici agtm 
• pcclallilng In compltit wtdding 
pwckag* plani and all othar occaalont 
Tha Coldan Lion Sutit accomodalat up 
lo 300 Tha Vanallan Room up to 140 
guaalt Gl>a Rlla a call for an 
appotnlmani lor your raaarvallon Naw 
brochurai ara aoailaHa 

(Air CondillOL.d) 

CAU. 

Quinc> Sont uf ltal> Social ( cnirr 

120 Quarrt SIrtcl, Quinct. MA 02169 

MW M MBKR is 472-^WO 




Summer Clearance 

25-50% Off Selected Items 

Think of Us for Showers and Weddings! 

OPEN YEAR ROUND 

Open Tues.-Sat. 10-5, Qosed Sundays & Mondays 

3 853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 



CaU John 
Harvey, 
Director 
of Ad- 
missions 
and let 
him 
explain 
the various options 
available in temporary 
respite care at Elihu 
White, one of the South 
Shore's premier 
healthcare centers. 



A full service hair salon 

MONDAY 

Women's Special $20.00 



TUES & THURS 
Men's Special 

WEDNESDAY 

Perm Special 

Starting at 



$13.00 



EUHU WHITE 

NURSING & REHABILITATION CENTER 

(617) 848-3678 
95 COMMERQAL STREET, BRAINTREE, MA 02184 



Starting at $42.00 .. ..x- • o^ . *.« 

^ ^ Nail Tipping & Overlay $60 

All specials include wash, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing A vailable 

We carry a full line of hair care products 



R£Di<£N KMS M€iUS 



PRUL MITCHELL 



wmatrix 



472-1 060 

Wm Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 29, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Storytelling Concert 
At Crane Library Aug. 3 



Musician, folklorist and 
storyteller Derek Burrows 
will appear at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library, 
Quincy Square, Tuesday, 
Aug. 3 at 7 p.m. 

Burrows' program is 
fiinded by the Quincy Arts 
Council and is for children 
age five and older and 
adults. 

Burrows, a native of the 
Bahamas, writes stories 
from research and personal 
experience. For the past 
decade he has introduced 
audiences at libraries, 
schools, cultural 

organizations, and 
festivals to the rhythms of 
the Islands. He breathes 
life into the heritage and 
traditions of the Caribbean 
with its African and 
English roots. The 
audiences may meet 
B'Bouki, B'Rabby, and 
Bahamian Smoky Joe as 
well as sing and clap 
along with the Goombay 
drum or guitar. 

The storytelling concert 
is a repeat performance for 
Burrows and is the fourth 




DEREK BURROWS 



in the summer program 
series. He will be followed 
by storyteller Carole 



Duhamel Aug. 10 and the 
Poobley Greegy Puppet 
Theater Aug. 17. 



Silver Medalist In 
Cello Concert At Bethany 



The fifth in a series of 
free Mid-Week Concerts 
will be held at Bethany 
Church Wednesday, Aug. 
4 at 12:15 p.m. 

The guest artist will be 
Andy Mark, 1993 Silver 
Medalist at the Osaka 
International Camber 
Music Competition. He 
will perform solo cello 
works by Johann Sebastian 
Bach. 

A lunch will be 
available in the Allen 



Parlor following the half 
hour concert. Child care is 
available. These concerts 
are being presented 
through the collaboration 



of the Friend of Bethany, 
Joanne French, coordinator 
and Virginia Sindelar, 
artistic director of 
Scarborough Productions. 



Christmas Parade 
Committee To Meet Aug. 4 

Houghs 



The Quincy Christmas 
Festival Committee will 
meet Wednesday, Aug. 4 
at 6:30 p.m. at the home of 
Jack and Peggy Nigro, 245 



NOW! 

A Complete Laser Video Disc 
Library At Your Fingertips 
If you have a laser disc player 
you can now easily select any 
disc in print by joining our club. 
Members receive our current 385- 
page catalogue listing over 7,000 titles 
which are dis- 
counted 10 per 
cent. 

Order now and 
receive a free copy 
of Laser View 
Magazine (a $2.50 
value) with your 
first laser disc or- 
der. 
Send only $6.25 (includes tax) 

plus $1.95 for shipping to: 

Laser Sights, P.O. Box 3392, 

Boston, Ma. 02101. 

■ (Allow 2 to 4 weeks for delivery) 




Winthrop St. 
Neck. 

Mayor James Sheets 
and Police Chief Francis 

Mullen will be among 
those in attendance. 
Chairman George White 
urges all committee 
members to attend. 

The 42nd annual 
Christmas Parade will be 
held Nov. 28. 

Save Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 




CAST MEMBERS of "School's Out For Charlie Brown!" include, from left, Helen 
Warshauer, Erin Connolly, and Trudy Wrublewskl of Quincy and CoUeen Carr and 
Chris Neal of Milton. The show, which will feature members of Diane Purdy's 
Children's Theatre Workshop and "The Tender Tappers," a senior citizens tap dance 
troupe, will be presented Saturday at 1 p.m. at The Woodward School, 1102 Hancock 
St. 

'Schoors Out For Charlie Brown!' 
At Woodward School Saturday 



Diane Purdy's 

Children's Theatre 
Workshop will present 
"School's Out For Charlie 
Brown!" Saturday at 1 p.m. 
at The Woodward School, 
1102 Hancock St. 

The show, written and 
directed by Purdy, will 



feature children ages 9-14 
and a guest appearance by 
"The Tender Tappers," a 
senior citizens tap dance 
troupe from the Dance 
Forever Studio in 
Braintree under the 
tutelage of Michelle 
Jablonski. 



Tickets are $5 at the 
door, $4 in advance, and 
$3 for seniors and children 
under 6. Refreshments will 
be included in the ticket 
price. 

For more information 
call 472-9233. 



Michelle Catrambone Top 
Winner In Flag Day Essay Contest 



Michelle Catrambone a 
Grade S student at 
Atherton Hough School 
was the top winner of the 
Houghs Neck Legion's 
annual Flag Day contest, 
"How to be True to the 
Red, White and Blue." 

She received from the 
post auxiliary Unit 380 a 
check for $25, while a 
trophy to the school to be 
retained for a year, was 

presented by the Legion 
Post. 

At Snug Harbor School, 
the winner was April 
Downey, who received a 
check for $25 from 
Squadron 380, Sons of the 
American Legion; and at 
Merrymount School, 
James Mateau received 
his $25 check from Post 



Michelle's Winning Essay 



My way of being true to 
our flag is by being 
patriotic, which means 
celebrating freedom of the 
United States of America 
on July 4th, and to stand 
proud when the "Star 
Spangled Banner" is 
played or sung. 

Another way to be 
patriotic to our flag is by 
taking care of our flag. 
This means take our flag 
in during bad weather and 
fold it correctly. When our 
flag is ripped and old, the 



American Legion Post 380 
has a flag burning 
ceremony. They take the 
ashes and bury them. 

The true meaning of the 
4th of July is the freedom 
of our country, not hot 
dogs, hamburgers, Pepsi 
and beer. On the 4th of 
July let the true Red, 
White and Blue always fly 
as free as our country! 

Michelle Catrambone 

Atherton Hough School 

Grade 5 



380. 

Alice Scribner and 
Mary Timcoe, essay 



cochairmen, presented the 
awards at Flag Day 
exercises at the schools. 



% 



jiC©©^^ 



1626 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 

(617) 328-4372 



©Sinm©!? Iron?©©'© 



Monday $5.95 

Meatloaf w/ Mushroom Sauce Mashed Potato & Vegetable 

Tuesday $6.95 

BBQ Steak Tips w/ French fries and Cole Slaw 

Wednesday $6.95 

Chicken Parmesean w/Vegetable and aB the pasta you can eat 

also Luau Chicken Skewers & Savory Rice $2.50 

Thursday $6.95 

Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner - All you can eat 

Friday $4.95 

Fish & Chips and Cole Slaw, Fried Baby Cod 

Saturday $4.25 

Franks & Beans 

2 1/4 pound Franks & Famous Beans 

Sunday All for $2.50 

SUMMERTIME COOKOUT 

Hot dog, Hamburger, Com-on-the-cob, Cole Slaw, Watermelon 

Stooges Beach Party Every Wednesday 



Children's Art Club 
At Beechwood Center 



An Art Club designed 
for children entering 
Grades 2-6 will begin 
Tuesday, Aug. 3 at 
Beechwood Community 
Life Center, 225 Fenno 
St., Wollaston. 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 773^600 



WED & THURS JULY 28 & 29 

AmoW Schwazenegger 
"LAST ACTION HERO" (pg-is) 

Action-Adventure-Fantasy 
EVES 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI JULY 30 
Sylvester Stallone 

"CLIFFHANGER" (R) 
Action Adventure 

FRI & SAT 7:00 & 9:15 
SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



MON & TUES DOLLAR NIGHT 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



The four-week class 
will meet Tuesday and 
Thursday mornings from 10 
a.m. to noon. Projects 
include drawing and 
painting, clay sculptures, 
wearable art, puppets, and 
more. 

For more information 
and registration call 471- 
5712. 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 

route. 

Telephone: 

471-3100 



52 Join YMCA 
President's Club 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Qulncy Sun Page 9 



Fifty-two individuals 
and businesses supported 
the South Shore YMCA's 
annual fundraising effort 
by joining the YMCA 
President's Club with gifts 
of $1,000 or more. 

The YMCA Annual 
Support Campaign 
provides financial 
assistance for families and 
children who can not 
afford the full cost of a 
YMCA camp, program or 
membership fee. This year, 
$144,000 has been raised 
on a campaign goal of 
$150,000. 

Alex Clark, president of 
Vulcan Tool Company in 
Hingham and chairman of 
the Y's campaign said, 
"Each year we've been 
able to raise more, but 
every year the need is 
greater as well. The Y has 
give out more in financial 
assistance than was raised 
in the campaign." 

The 52 members of the 
1993 President's Club are: 

Anderson Insulation, 
James D. Asher, Bay State 
Milling, Karl Briggs, 
Robert & Kathy Bunstein, 
Burgin Platner Insurance 
Agency, R.D. Chase 
Insurance Agency, The 
Alex Clark Family, W. 
Gordon «& and Marjorie 

Clark, Continental 
Cablevision, Forrest Cook, 
The Co-Operative Bank, 
The Crofts- Wisch Family, 
Eleanor Dacey, Mark 
Dickinson, Lillian Dodd, 
The Eldred Family, 
Herbert Emilson. 



Glenn & Diane 
Ferguson, Tom Hatley, 
Phyllis Godwin, Hancock 
Paint, Mrs. Murray 
Hayward, Paul & Connie 
Hurley, David Keefe, 
William Kelley, William 
Kennedy, Kohlberg 
Foundation, Georgette 
Nickerson, Raymond 
Norton, O'Connor & Drew, 
Peabody Management, 
P.l.A.B. Vacuum Products, 
Quincy Kiwanis Club, 
Quincy Mutual Fire 
Insurance Co. 

Quincy Rotary Club, 
Quincy Savings Bank, 
Shawmut Bank, John M. 
Sheskey & Assoc, Inc, 
William & Clara Sheskey, 
South Boston Saving 
Bank, South Shore Bank, 
South Weymouth Savings 
Bank, Sprague Air 
Controls, Dan Striar, 
Sullivan Tire, Brian 
Tedeschi, George Troupe, 
Vulcan Company, Inc. 
Walsh Construction, Mary 
Wentworth, Ralph Yohe. 

In all, over 1,500 
members and friends of the 
YMCA contributed to the 
campaign, while over 100 
volunteers worked to raise 
the funds. Key volunteer 
leadership of the 
campaign, working with 
Chairman Clark, included 
Steve Farquhar, general 
manager of Continental 
Cablevision in Quincy; 
John Sheskey, president of 
John Sheskey & 
Associates of Quincy; and 
David Keefe, YMCA 
board chairman from 
Cohasset. 



4 Residents On Dean's List 
At Salem State College 



Four Quincy residents 
were recently named to 
the Dean's List for the 
spring semester at Salem 
State College. 



They are: 

Joseph P. Bevilacqua, 
J.R. Dasilva, Patrice L. 
Dykens, and Jennif^pir L. 
Richardson. 



St. Ann^s School 

1 St. Ann Road, Wollaston 

Announces a summer 
refresher course 

Aug. 23 - Sept. 3 

Material to be covered: 
I. Motivation 
n. Skills Preparation 
in. Math Readiness 

IV. Language Arts 

V. Reading 

For students 
entering grades 4-8 

Cost: $75 
A great way to prepare 

for September. 
For more information 

Call 471-9071 

(Limited Space) 



Tlease help 
me return 
$140 miUion 
to the people 
on this list.' 





/iUy'U^Cj'' 




Massofhusftts 

State Trrasuref 

and Receiver -Gtneral 

Under our Massachusetts abandoned property law, accounts which have been inactive for more than 
three years are declared abandoned and turned over to the StateTreasury for safekeeping. 

That's why I've compiled the following list of individuals and organizations who have money 
waiting for them. Owners and their heirs need not pay a tinder's fee to anyone to claim what is 
rightfully theirs. If you sec your name, write mc at: 

State Treasury 
Unclaimed Property Division 
One Ashburton Place-I2th Floor 
>-^ Boston, MA 02108 

Or for more information, call my office at: (617) 367-0400. To help process your claim 
r^i even faster, please give your name as it appears on this list, plus your current address, your 
address three years ago and social security number. We're here to help you Monday through Friday, 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 



Adams, Pub 
Agn«cy Inc. A T A Ins. 

Mechanical ContA/C 
Mastercraft 

Amity Insurance Agency 
Applied Data Research IrK 
AppolonI, Giselle M. 
Arnold. Robert A. 
Arnold or Edward M. 

Arnold, Barbara A. 
Ayer, James J. 
B & 8 Inc. DBA 
Bachman & Randl 

Bachman, Joseph 
Baldad. Annette H. 
Balsamo, Catherin 
Bames,James E. 
Barry, Mary T. 
Barton, David 
Bay State Health Care 
Baystate, Volkswagen 
BelvkJere, Trust 
Bemau, Arthur 

Trust, Dept 

Trust, Department 
Berry, Lawrence P. 
Boston, Tie O. 
Bousquet Mem Trdianne 
Brennan, Gerald 
Brooks, James E. 
Brown, Robert 
Browne, Ethel M. 
BuczkowsM, Stanley 
Bushman, Albert F. 
Butler, Joseph 
Byrne or Rose M. 

Bryne, Pauline V. 
Cahoon, Helen B. 
Calabro, Paul J. 
Candeloro Cust. Nick 

Candeloro, Michael 

J. 
Canlslus, Frank 
Carey, Paul J. 
Cavanagh, SaUna 
Charlton, Elizabeth 
Charpenller, Lionel 
Chase Manhattan Bank 

J S B Auto Body 
Chin, Edwin 
Cigna, 

Cigna, Corporation 
Cigna P & C companies 
Clofford a Patrick 

Cloflord, Suzanne 
Collins, Gertaide E. 
Collins, W^terW. 
Connors, Jennifer 
Consultants, A & M 
Corkery, Thomas J. 
Coughlln, James W. 
Coyne, William 
Cullen, Judith A. 
Curtis, Richard 
Dairy Mart 
Dairy Mart M 13 
Dairy Mart M 6 
Dalgin Tr. Rani 

Dalgrin, Rebecca 
Daly, Norma 
DantI Tr. Angelo 

BerlocchI, Clara 

BertocchI, Clara 

BerloccN, Clara 
Day. One 

Dellslle, Richard A. 
DembskI, Edmond L. 
Depaolo, Michael P. 
Derbes, Linda C. 

Dertse*, Toffee 
Deschamp, Wanda 
DonafKia, Marjorte 
Donate, Alfredo 
Dorchester, Mutual Fire 
Douoette, Jeannette 
Drtscoll, William J. 

Driscoll, Bryan 
Drohan, Scott M. 

Burge, April 
Duggan, James F. 
Duggan Tr. Catherine M. 
Duggan, Kerry 
Duncanson, Jame* M. 



Eastman, Daniel D. 
Electrical, Bennett 
Ellis, Robert L. 
Everett, Steven 
Every, Allyson 
Fabbraio, Sylvia 

Walker, Barbara 
Faico, Donald 
Farmer, Paul K. 
Farr, George 
Ferrante, Adeline 
Fields, Dana Steven 
Flotlnl, Josephine A. 
Fisher, Elizabeth 
Fisher, Scott W. 
Flaherty, Miss M. 
Fletcher's Rest & Pub 
Flynn, John P. 

Fund, Clients 
Flynn, Jr. F. J. 

Sec Deposit Tr Acct 
Flynn or Paul J. 

Mullen, Ellen J. 
Foley, Edward P. 
Franklin A Delroy 

Gillette Atty Sumner B. 
Fruit Inc. Fan Fare 
Qaldls, Joseph G. 
Galiahue or Marlon E. 

Gatiahue, James F. 
Galiahue, James F. 
Gately, Robert F. 

Gately Richard Susan 
Gllmore, Edna A. 
Glass Cos. Inc. Settles 
Grenham, Thomas 
Grogan, Edmund T. 
H & I Committee 

Area, Massachusetts 
Hamilton, Geneva M. 

Dukes, Natalie 
Hanna & Martha M. 

Hanna, James A. 
Herman, George J. 
Hicks, Susan D. 
Hoang, Thuyen 
Holberl, Gloria A. 
Howard Johnson Auto MDS 
Howes, Margaret 
Huang, Llan Y. 
Hutchinson, Susan M. 
Hyde, Edward J. 
Jacobs, Reginald F. 

Jacobs, Judith 
Janis, Peter R. 
Jenness, Albert 
Johnson, Arthur 
Johnston, Kevin 
Joliiffe, R.N. 
Joyce, Nora T. 

Joyce, John 
Joyce, Richard J. 
Kane, James E. 
Kane, V. 

Karlsberg & Ceiia 
Kelley, Thomas 
Kelly, Margaret A. 
Kelsch Or Monica E. 

Saivagglo, Monica C. 
Kenney Or Mary G. 

Wynne, Mary G. 
Kleber & Richard T. 

Kleber, Nancy C. 
Koiodzlej, Stada J. 
Kosartck, Est. of Waiter J. 

Johnson Exec Natalie 
Kouvtiis, John 
Kuttzman, Or Stella 

Kurtzman, Steven 
Kwok, Hopan 

Kwok, Mel 
Landay, Jeanne R. 

Landy, Benjamin 
Lannan Jr. Joseph 
Leavitt, Ruth 

Cohen, Martha 
Leonard, Patricia M. 
Laondike, George 
Leslie, Alice M. 
Uang Benef YIng J. 

Llartg Cust Qlu 
Lyons or Annie E. 



Morton, Lena 
MaoQregor, William 
MacKay, Winifred B. 
Maksoud DBA Handy M 

Maksoud Parker P. 
Mallaco, Ana L. 
Manzano, Romero 
Maranhaa, Jeffrey E. 
Matt, James A. 
Mauilellio, Karen E. 
McArdto, Estate of Mary A 

Fleming Exec Arthur 
McDonald, Delia 
McDonough & Zagamlhassey 
McGIII, B K. 
MoQuiggan, Paul T. 
McKenna, Patrick 
McKenzie, Helen 
McLeod, Jessie 
McLeod. Katherfne H. 

Stiles, Margaret 
Measor Tr Carol Ann 
Measor, Jennifer 
Metsoy, Anastaslo* S. 
Meyer, Paul 
Miriam H. Kramerthe Estate of 

Kramer Extr. Maurice R 
Mitchell, Helen E. 
MItcheii, Joseph 

Mitchell, or Rosa 
MIyakawa, T.S 

Corea Exec Peter V. 
Miyao, Talf 
Moccia a Michael J. 
GMAC, 
Montillos, Pastry Shop & 

Settles Glass Co. 
Morales, Maioune Q. 
Morgan, Margaret M. 

KIley, Margaret 
Mullen & Patrick 

GMAC, 
Mulilan, Thomas V. 
Muiiln, Gerard 
Murphy, Anne M. 
Murphy, Mary 
Murphy, Maureen 
Murphy-Bucella, Cheryl 

CIdado, Rosatyn 
Myatt, Stephen W. 
National Appraisal 
Natl Appraisal SVC 
Nelson, Eleanor B. 
New England Marathon 
New England Indmed Examiner* 
Nguyen, Tan 
Nicholson, EsL of Ethel 

Jackson Jr. Tr David J, 
Nicholson, M. 
Nolan, Frances C. 

Lounsbuty, Francis 
O'Conneli, HaroM A. 

Griffin, Pamela 
O'Donneii, Janice M. 
O'Flaherty, John 
O'Leary, William J. 
O'Neli, Peter 
OTlelli, George E. 
Orlando, David A. 
O'Routke, Kathleen 
Ostby, Richard 
Panagos, James N. 
Papadopouios, Konstantlnos 
Pearson, Estate of Eric 
Perry, Mrs. 
Pezzeila, Victoria 
PNibIn, James M. 
Phys Therafxy & Sports Cond Ct 
Pizza, Express 
Pomfret, Pamela 
Pucda, Anthony 
Oulncy, City Of 
Quincy Police Dept. 
Oulncy Radiol Assoc 
QuIntliianI, CleofonitI 
Rapson, Mattt A. 

GMAC 
Reardon, Sandy-Jo 
Reddish. RHa 
Relily ins. Agcy Rliey ft 
Revallotis, Robert A. 
Rhode*, Kenneth J. 



Ricclaralll, Paul Q. 

Rlcdaielll, Dawn 
Ricciareill, Dawn 
Richards, George L. 
Reilly Ins. Agcy Riley a 

A/C Pizzottt Brother* ItK 
Rliey, Elaine M. 
Rliey, Frmnds 
Riley & Relily In*. Agcy Inc 
RisI, Joseph J. 
Rivard, Beatrice 
River Junction Enterprises 
Robertson, Jessie 
RoHlns, William 
Rommelt, Caroline I. 
Ross, Russell 
Rowan, Joseph W. 
RuUn, Molly 
Rumley a William T. 

General Motors Accept Corp 
Rumson. Beatrice L 
Saad. Robt 
Sandler, Elizabeth 
Scanneil, Jerry 
Sensory, Resources NA 
Settiss, Glass Co 
Shea, Hannah J. 

Rita D. Colllns Mary D. KOL3 
Shinners, Kathleen 
Silk, Jason H. 
SImonds, Edna A. 
Skaff a Mardun K 

SkaffJTTenNa)laF 
Smith, Cornelius B. 
So. South Healthlltnass 
Sobol, Lois N. 
Sousa, Mary 

Sousa, or Maty 
South Shore National Bank 
St. George Assoceastem Mass 
Stewart, Lee H. 
Stuart, Maria M. 

Stuart, Thomas 
Suffolk, Law School 
Swanson a Richard P. 

Swanson, Mary 
Sweeney, Martin E. 
Sweeney a Donald 

BayBank, Mkkllesex 
Ta, Dan T. 

Tasslnary, Reporting Serv 
TelllerSr. Richard L 
Terzts, Philip 

The Travelers Insurance Co. 
TWnh, Trinh 
Thomas, Virginia M. 
Tumlngmlil, condo 
USFaQ 
Uboh, Doris 

United Nat Adjustment Ser 
Vannerin, Claire M. 
Vignali, Marcel 
VIssa, Joseph H. 
VIssa or Robert A. 

VIssa, Ann M. 
Walsh, Patrick J. 
Waxman, Susan J. 
Webb, Kenneth E. 
Weixler, Mary 
Welch. Marion L. 
Welch. Thomas P. 
Way MPaG Tune Uno 

Ralph E. Kelly 
White. David F. 
White. Teny 
Wlikie, Marie 

Barilaro, Agnes 
Wilkinson, Vera 
William*, Donna 
WIrtanen, Leonard C. 
WoHe, Milton 

Wollaston Past Counsellors ASC 
Woriwr* Comp Injury Ctr 
Worth, U*a P. 
Ying, Lin Gui 

Lau. William H. 
Yu, Cecilia 
Zang Wentz Elizabeth 

Wentz, Chartes R. 
ZoccN, Peter C. 
Zukowsfcl a Susan E. GMAC 



Tag* 10 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 2«>, l«W3 



Si4n Editor Suiyeys Quincy, III. 

The Great Flood Of 1993 
Won't Soon Be Forgotten 



By ROBERT BOSWORTH 
Quincy, Ill.-Ot all the 
natural disasters I've 
witnessed, nothing 
compares to the expansive 
destruction of the Great 
Flood of 1993, particularly 
in the Quincy, Ill-West 
Quincy, Mo. area. 

Thousands of acres of 
prime farm land and small 
residential areas 

swallowed up by the ever 
expanding Mississippi 
River. Mile after mile of 
sandbags piled 10 feet 
high and just as wide. 
Major highways reduced to 
mere riverways with water 
18 feet deep. 

And what's even more 
mind-boggling is the fact 
that the flood conditions in 
Quincy, 111 and 
neighboring West Quincy, 
Mo. are rampant up and 
down the mighty 
Mississippi. With more 
heavy rains forecasted, 
those conditions are 
expected to swell in the 
coming months. 

The Great Flood of 
1993 has been called a 
lOO-year-flood. That's a 
flood so big that is has 
only one chance in a 
hundred of happening aity' 
given year. 

Midwest residents along 
the Mississippi thought 
they had experienced the 
great flood of their Ufetime 
in 1973. But 20 years 
later, they are strugghng 
and coping with thp 
greatest natural disaster 
ever to befall that area. 

"It's the worse I've 
seen. I've been here 20 
years," said Jeff Jansen, 
an administrator for the 
City of Quincy. "In the 
Flood of 1973, the levy 
broke but water rose only 
four or five feet and it 
didn't last. 

"This flood water will 
take a lot of time to 
recede." 

The destruction to 
Quincy, 111. would have 
been much greater if the 
city of 49,000 were not 
situated on top of a 200- 
foot bluff. However, many 
lower-lying residential 
areas closer to the eastern 
side of the Mississippi 
have experienced flooding 
never before seen. 

Last Tuesday while 
vacationing in the 
Midwest, I visited Quincy, 
m. to get a first-band look 
at perhaps the greatest 
disaster in this country's 
history. 

For two hours, I was 
guided through the flooded 
area by Tim Jarvis, 
assistant street 

superintendent for Quincy, 
111. Jarvis, a pleasant and 
personable man, helped 
interpret Mother Nature's 
havoc and devastation. 



Our first stop was to :m 
industrial complex about 
one mile south of the 
Bay view Bridge which 
links Quincy, HI. to 
Quincy. Mo. The complex 
appeared like a fortress as 
thousands of sandbags, 
some piled 10 feet high, 
surrounded the area to 
keep water at bay. 

Jarvis noted the water 
was a quarter of a mile 
from the eastern side of 
the Mississippi. In 
Quincy, Mass., that would 
be like businesses in 
Quincy Center 

sandbagging to keep out 
the Town River. 

We next set out on a 
levee to see if there were 
any sandbagging 

operations going on. A 
National Guard truck 
stopped us at the entrance 
to the levee and Jarvis 
explained the reason for us 
being there. 

"This man's from 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
and would like to take a 
few pictures of the levee. 
Is that all right?" Jarvis 
asked. The two guardsmen 
nodded and off we went. 

A few minutes later, the 
levee road disappeared 
under water. We stopped 
and pondered our next 
move. 

"Well, what should we 
do?" Jarvis asked me. 

"I'm not sure. How 
deep is that water," I 
lepUed. 

"Probably 12 inches." 

"Let's give it a try and 
if it's deeper, we can 
always stop and turn 
back." 

Jarvis stepped on the 
gas gingerly and the truck 
sputtered through the 
water. On either side of 
the levee was water for 
several hundred yards. 

The water deepened 
and Jarvis stopped. "I'm 
not sure we can make it. 
The water looks like it 
gets deeper before it gets 
shallower. I'd rather be 
safe than sorry." 

I agreed. We turned 
around. As we headed 
back, a smaller pickup 
truck approached us. 

"You can make it out 
there. I've done it," said 
the old man behind the 
wheel. Jarvis and I looked 
at each other in 
amazement. We decided 
to give it another try. 

"You can follow me," 
said the old man. Then he 
laughed, "You might have 
to rescue me if I get 
stuck." 

We made it past where 
we had been and 
continued following the 
small truck. The water 
then got deeper and 
deeper. The bumper of the 




•IMlEDWJi' 

CF MASSACHUSETTS B/SY 



smaller truck disappeared 
lus it inched forward. 

"How deep do you think 
that water is," 1 asked. 

"At least 30 inches," 
Jarvis answered, eyes 
fixed straight iihcad. 

Gradually, the water on 
the levee lessened and we 
reached dry ground. The 
trucks stopped at the old 
man's cottage located in 
the campground near the 
banks of the Mississippi. 
The home was flooded. 

Jarvis said the levee 
ahead was probably worse 
and after I took a photo, 
we headed back. 

"That's enough 
excitement for today," 
Jarvis said. 

Back on a main street, 
we viewed some flooded 
residential areas. Homes, 
garages and cars under 8 
and 10 feet of water. It 
appeared as if a helicopter 
had dropped them in a 
lake for there was water 
clear up to the horizon and 
beyond. 

After 90 minutes, I 
thought 1 had seen 
everything. But the last 
scene punctuated the 
entire visit. 

Jarvis headed toward 
Route 24 and the Bayview 
Bridge. We passed 
through a state police 
check point on the Illinois 
side and headed toward 
West Quincy, Mo. 

We ascended the bridge 
and passed by a sign 
welcoming visitors to 
Missouri. As we 

descended, an awesome 
site awaited us. 

Route 24 west toward 
Missouri, about 500 feet 
from the foot of the bridge, 
was under water. A state 
trooper at the scene said a 
levee break in Quincy, 111. 
on July 23 flooded 14,000 
acres, including farm land 
and a retail district for 
motorists and truckers. 

Water six to 18 feet 
deep covered six miles of 
Route 24. That's like 
Quincy Ave. and Hancock 
St. flooded from 
Weymouth Landing to the 
Neponset River Bridge. 

I snapped a photo, 
gazed out in each 
direction and then climbed 
back into the truck for the 
trip back. I said goodbye 
to Jarvis who had asked 
me if Quincy, Mass. has 
ever experienced flooding 
like her sister city in the 
Midwest. 

"No. The only flooding 
we get is from the ocean 
and that's usually 
isolated." 

Then I started thinking. 
I've lived through 
blizzards and hurricanes 
and even witnessed the 
Yellowstone Park forest 
fires in 1989. 

But the Great Flood of 
1993 is the single most 
devastating natural 
disaster I have ever seen. 
I'm sure thousands of 
people would agree. 











■^ 



jtiM. 













■W*^" 



A COMMON SCENE: Sandbags prevent a tributary of the Mississippi River from 
wiping out a main road in Quincy, III. Water did cascade over the sandbags onto the 
road but workers were able to pump the water back, allowing volunteers to resume 
sandbagging. 




SMALL TRIBUTARY of the Mississippi River overflowed its banks, flooding this small 
residential area in Quincy, Dl. A camper and car practically disappear in the muddy 
water. 




A PICKUP TRUCK manages to travel along a levee road 30 inches under water in 
Quincy, Dl. The driver of the truck risked stalling out and perhaps abandonment to get 
to his cottage in a campground along the Mississippi River. The deep water was not 
caused by a levee break but a backed up drainage ditch brought on by heavy rains. 
Quincy, Dl. received six inches of rain in one day earlier this summer. 




12,000 TO 18,000 acres of prime farm land l>ecame a lake when a levee broke near .«« 
Graves Drainage District four miles east of the Mississippi. This was the first levy to 
break in Quincy, Dl. (Quincy Sm photos by Robert Bosworth) 




Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 11 



THE SWOLLEN MISSISSIPPI River Hoods a park in Quincy, Dl. The water is six feet 
deep and 200 feet over its banlc. In the background to the right is Dam #21 which once 
controlled the flow of the Mississippi. 





COUNTLESS SANDBAGS fUled by weary but dedicated volunteers Une the Mississippi 
River along the 52-mile Sny Island levee in Quincy, Dl. This picture was taken about a 
half mile from the east side of the river. Officials estimate that more than one million 
sandbags were placed along the levee, which gave way Sunday in Pike County, about 10 
miles south of Quincy, Dl. The break covered 40,000 acres, including prime farm land. 




A HOMEMADE WOODEN sign in Quincy, Dl. thanks the thousands of volunteers who 
filled and placed sandbags along levees. Tim Jarvis, assistant street superintendent for 
the City of Quincy, Dl. estimated as many as 500,000 volunteers helped fill at least one 
million sandbags to heighten and strengthen area levees. In one 20-minute interval, 20 
tons of sand were bagged. (Quincy Sun photos by Robert Bosworth) 



Were making 
a difference in 



Wollaston. 



At Fleet Bank, we're working hard to make a positive 

difference in the way you bank. After all, we're a different kind of bank. 

Backed by all the resources of the Fleet Financial Group, we're able to 

offer you the kind of innovative products and services you need today 

Like our low rate home equity loan and money-saving credit card offers. 

So stop in soon and find out how we can make a difference for you. 



.M. 



Member FDIC, 



Fleet Bank 

A Member oi Fleci I'injnciJ (7mu/i 

We're here to make a difference: 

20 Beale Street, Wollaston, MA 02170, (617) 7730503 
Lobby Hours: Mon-Thurs 9-}: Fri 9-4J0; Sat 9-12. 
Drive Through Houn: Mon-Fri 8J0-4M Sat 9-12 



LEVEES COLLAPSING in and around the Quincy, Dl. area have flooded thousands of 
acres, including this small residential area. 



•«ii*!«*«w%t-:it*!!„ 







^^•11^' 



** » 



•i 



"^^fc^csl^^ 



THIS PHOTOGRAPH taken from a helicopter shows the widespread flooding in West 
Quincy, Mo. In the background is the Bayview Bridge which connects Quincy, HI. to 
West ~ 




TONY SICILIAN©, deputy director of Quincy Emergency Management, stands beside 
some of the 200,000 pounds of food and supplies donated by Quincy, Mass. citizens and 
sent to help residents in Quincy, Dl. (James Sheets photos) 

POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT POUTICAL ADVERTISEMENT POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



ELECT 

John 
Spada 

QUINCY 

SCHOOL 

COMMITTEE 




John, Marie, Elizabeth 

EDUCATION: 

' UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS B.A. MANAGEMENT 

• BENTLEY COLLEGE M.BA. CANDIDATE 

WORK EXPERIENCE: 

' BUSINESS UNIT MANAGER, FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 

COMMUNITY SERVICE/INVOLVEMENT: 

• CAPTAIN, UNITED STATES ARMY RESERVE, AWARDED THE 
ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL DURING THE PERSL\N GULF 
CONFLICT 

• MEMBER OF THE MORRISETTE POST NO. 294 AMERICAN LEGION 

• COORDINATOR OF FOOD/FUND RAISING DRIVES FOR SEVERAL 
LOCAL CHARITIES 

Preliminary Election September 14th 
Final Election November 2nd 

The Committee to Elect John Spada - 88 Foites Hill Road, Quincy, MA 02170, Brian S Mulkem, Chairman 



Page 12 Qulncy Sun Thursday, July 29, 1993 




Harry W. Hanson, 68 

Retired Letter Carrier 



A funeral Mass for 
Harry W. Hanson, 68, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
St. John the Baptist 
Church. 

Mr. Hanson died July 24 
at Quincy Hospital. 

He was a letter carrier 
for the U.S. Postal Service 
in Quincy and Boston for 
13 years before retiring in 
1973. Previously, he 
worked for General 
Dynamics as a metalsmith 
at the Fore River Shipyard 
in Quincy. 

A Navy veteran of 
World War II and the 
Korean War, he was a 
member of the Disabled 
American Veterans and 
the George F. Bryan VFW 
Post in Quincy. 

Bom in Brockton, he 



lived most of his life in 
Quincy. 

Husband of the late 
Dorothy L. (Byrne) 
Hanson, he is survived by 
two sons, Brian M. Hanson 
of Quincy and Thomas P. 
Hanson of Buckfield, Me.; 
a daughter, Carol A. 
Hanson of Brockton; two 
sisters, Phylhs Knight of 
Squantum and Shirley 
Melchianno of Brockton; 
his former wife, Phyllis 
(Mahoney) Hanson of 
Nashua, N.H.; and five 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in Melrose 
Cemetery, Brockton. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 

Donations may be made 
to St. Joseph's Building 
Fund, 580 Washington St., 
Quincy, MA 02169. 



Ethel E. Solari, 93 



A funeral service for 
Ethel E. (Taylor) Solari, 
93, of Quincy, was held 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
the Hamel, Wickens and 
Troupe Funeral Home, 26 
Adams St. 

Mr. Solari died July 25 
at the Quincy 



Rehabilitation and Nursing 
Center. 

Bom in Boston, she 
attended Boston schools. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Benedict A. 
Solari. 

Burial was in Cedar 
Grove Cemetery, 

Dorchester. 




SCOTT DEWARE 



A THOUGHT 
FOR THE WEEK 



W. Somerset Maugham 
wrote: "For the average man a 
sufficient role of IK* is to foliow 
his instincts controlled by the 
moral standard of the society In 
which he Ihres." 
Have you ever iseen cmight In a horrible storm while 
driving a car?...When your windshield wiper could hardly 
clear your window to ghre you a clear view of the road? 
Were not the yellow and white lines in the road helpful to 
you? Without them you probably would not have been 
able to contlraie driving. They protected you from going 
Into the dMch. 

Let's thinic about these questions In regard to our day- 
by-ctey liviitg...Safety Iktes have been given to us. The 
llrtea are safety guides and common sense should fiell us 
how important they are... Yet, some people continually 
Ignore tliem... 

The ImsIc guides are In the Bible such as the Beati- 
tudes, tlie Lord's Prayer and, of course, the all important 
Ten Commandments, h H not true that if we foliow these 
white lines carefully, we would avoid the many 'dRches' of 
difficulty in our daily IMng?... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 

472-1137 

Member of the 'New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered to Any Distance 



Richard D. Allen, 72 

Former Patriot Ledger 
V.P., General Manager 



A funeral service for 
Richard D. "Denny" Allen, 
72, of Weymouth, former 
vice president and general 
manager of The Patriot 
Ledger, was held Monday 
in Old South Union 
Congregational Church, 
Columbian Square, South 
Weymouth. 

The Rev. Gary Blume, 
pastor of the First Church 
in Weymouth, and the 
Rev. Dr. M. James 
Workman, pastor emeritus 
of the First Congregational 
Church of Brain tree, co- 
officiated at the service. A 
Masonic service was held 
the previous night at the 
Mortimer N. Peck Funeral 
Home in Braintree. 

Mr. Allen, who had 
been hospitalized in recent 
weeks for treatment of 
emphysema, died July 21. 

He rose from part-time 
sports writer to general 
manager during a half- 
century career at the 
newspaper. He retired in 
1989 but remained as a 
member of the board of 
directors. 

He was a former 
resident of Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Marjorie (Briand) 
Jennings-AUen; three sons, 
Richard D. Allen Jr. of 
Florida, David B. Allen of 
Halifax and Mark E. 
Jennings of New 
Hampshire; two daughters, 
Patricia R. Cooke of 




Joseph G. Flaccomio, 52 



A funeral service for 
Joseph G. Flaccomio, 52, 
of Germantown, formerly 
of Weymouth, was held 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
the Pitman Chapel of the 
Forest HiUs Crematory. 



Qi 



United W^ 

/( hringi (Hjl Ihf brsl in all of us 



Mr. Flaccomio died 
July 23 at Milton Hospital 
after a long illness. 

There are no survivors. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Deware 
Funeral Home, 576 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



MONUMENTS 


QUINCY 
MEMORIALS Inc. 




Cemetery Lettering 






Cleaning 








Vigil Lights 




iSWillardSt. 




Sculpturing 
Rose Quartz 




Quincy 02169 




Mausoleums 








Markers 
Colonial Tablets 




"On The Expressway" 




Stant Markers 




Exit 9 Near E. Milton Sq. 


J 


Bronze Markers 


L. 




|617-471-0250| 


Free Illustrated Catalog 
Budget Terms Available 



Anthony R. Petrosky, 79 

Retired Trucking Co. Mechanic 



RICHARD D. ALLEN 

Randolph and Marcia 
Jennings-Konkel of 
California; a brother, 
Ethan Allen of Florida; a 
sister, Ruth Bascom of 
Ohio; 12 grandchildren, 
and two great- 
grandchildren. 

He was also the 
husband of the late 
Josephine M. 

(Tomaszewski) Allen. 

Mr. Allen's sister, 
Beatrice Brock, a 
longtime Braintree 
resident, died in 1991. 

Burial was in Blue Hill 
Cemetery, Braintree. 

Donations may be made 
to the Building Fund, Old 
South Union 

Congregational Church, 
Columbian St., South 
Weymouth, MA 02190 or 
to the Shriners Burns 
Institute, 56 Blossom St., 
Boston, MA 02114. 



A funeral Mass for 
Anthony J. Petrosky, 79, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
yesterday (Wednesday) in 
St. Boniface Church. 

Mr. Petrosky died July 
25 at Quincy Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

A retired mechanic, he 
worked for the former 
Stone's Express-Retail 
Stores Delivery Trucking 
Company of Cambridge 
and Quincy for over 30 
years. He retired 20 years 
ago. 

Born and educated in 
Cambridge, he lived there 
for many years before 
moving to Quincy 20 years 
ago. 

An Army veteran of 
World War II, he was a 
former member of the 
Disabled American 



Veterans of Cambridge 
and the American 
Veterans of Somerville. 

Husband of the late 
Mildred (Smith) Petrosky, 
he is survived by two sons, 
Raymond A. Petrosky of 
South Boston and Edward 
D. Petrosky of Norwood; a 
daughter, Mildred C. 
Wright of Weymouth; a 
sister, Jennifer McNeil of 
New Hampshire; five 
grandchildren and a friend, 
Ethel O'Brien of Webster. 

Burial was in 
Cambridge Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 
Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 



James A. Ryan, 63 

Security Guard 

A funeral Mass for He is survived by his 



James A. Ryan, 63, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
Monday in Most Blessed 
Sacrament Church. 

Mr. Ryan died July 21 
at Carney Hospital in 
Dorchester after a brief 
illness. 

He was employed by 
Weymouth Art Leather in 
Braintree for 15 years 
before retiring in 1990. 
After his retirement, he 
was a security guard at 
Dupont Associates in 
Boston. 

Born in Boston, he 
lived in Quincy since 



mother, Margaret 
(Canavan) Ryan of 
Quincy; two brothers, 
Thomas J. Ryan of 
Reading and Robert K. 
Ryan of Quincy; and a 
sister, Mary M. Minyard of 
New Mexico. He was also 
the son of the late James 
Ryan. 

Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keobane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 



1957. He was a member of to the Quincy Council on 
the North Quincy Knights Aging, 1120 Hancock St., 
of Columbus. Quincy, MA 02 1 69. 



Eva Kleppel, 83 

Retired Bookkeeper 



A funeral service for 
Eva Kleppel, 83, of 
Quincy, was held July 22 
at Stanetsky Memorial 
Chapels, Brookline. 

Mrs. Kleppel died July 
20 at home. 

A former bookkeeper for 
WROL in Boston, she 
worked 26 years at the 
radio station before 
retiring. 

She was a member of 
the Quincy Hadassah and 
a volunteer at the Boston 
Blood Bank and the 
Jamaica Plain Veterans 
Administration Medical 
Center. Her hobbies 



included knitting, 
crocheting and traveling. 

Born in Providence, 
R.I., she lived in Mattapan 
before moving to Quincy 
25 years ago. 

She is survived by a 
niece, Arline Steinberg of 
Framingham: and several 

grandnieces and 

grandnephews. 

Burial was in Agudath 
Israel Cemetery, West 
Roxbury. 

Memorial week was 
private. 

Donations may be made 
to the charity of one's 
choice. 




Sweeney JSroihers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 
JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 



CHRISTIAN DIOR • SOPHIA LORCN * JOAN COLLiNS • VUARNET « 



Fashion 

Eyewear 

SAVE 

^^35 



HEARING AIDS|I 

1361-AHancockSt.,QuincySq. ^ 
773-3505 • 773-4174 ^ 

":^;r $499 ^ 

Complete "" 

30 Day Trial 2 Yr. Warranty 

FREE VALIDATED PARKING 



1 YEAR WARRANTY 
ON ALL FRAMES 

Hii ',Tr,^ « avANT r.ARnf 



BM] B 



israp npi « ockjt/. 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Son Page 13 



Audrey R. 

Former Coffee 

A funeral Mass for 
Audrey R. (O'Neil) 
Crosby, 68, of Quincy, was 
celebrated yesterday 
(Wednesday) in Sacred 
Heart Church. 

Mrs. Crosby died July 
24 at New England Sinai 
Hospital in Stoughton. 

A bookkeeper at the 
Araban Coffee Co. in 
Boston for 30 years, she 
retired in 1990. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived in Dorchester before 
moving to Quincy 43 years 
ago. 

Wife of the late Stanley 
W. Crosby, she is survived 



Crosby, 68 

Co. Bookkeeper 

by a son and daughter-in- 
law, Michael A. and 
Meredith E. Crosby of 
Hanover; three sisters, 
Anne M. Lee of 
Winchester, Eleanor Ryan 
of Quincy and Dorothy 

Wood of Gray, Me.; and 
two granddaughters. 

Burial was in Mt. 
WoUaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keobane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 

Donations may be made 
to the Hospice of the 
South Shore, 100 Bay 
State Rd., Braintree, MA 
02184. 



Barbara Cameron, 69 

Served As Boston Chief Assessor; 
Mayoral Assistant 



Paul P. Elias, 37 

Construction Worker 



A funeral Mass for Paul 
P. Elias, 37, of Quincy, 
formerly of Weymouth, 
was celebrated July 23 in 
Immaculate Conception 
Church, East Weymouth. 

Mr. Ehas died July 19 
at Quincy Hospital after a 
long illness. 

He was a laborer for 
local construction 
companies. 

Born and educated in 
Weymouth, he graduated 
from Weymouth Trade 
High School. He lived in 
Quincy for five years. 

He is survived by his 
parents, Louis H. Elias and 
Mary E. (Sliby) Rollins, 
both of Weymouth; two 



brothers, David L. Elias of 
Plymouth and John A. 
Elias of Weymouth; three 
sisters, Leslie A. Barbetta 
of Plymouth, and Theresa 
M. Coletti and Lisa M. 
Lea, both of Weymouth; 
and seven nephews and 
nieces. 

Burial was in Mt. Hope 
Cemetery, South 

Weymouth. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the McDonald 
Funeral Home, South 
Weymouth. 

Donations may be made 
to the American Cancer 
Society, 294 Pleasant St., 
Stoughton, MA 02072. 



A funeral Mass for 
Barbara Graham Cameron, 
69, of Quincy, was 
celebrated July 23 in Star 
of the Sea Church. 

Mrs. Cameron died July 
19 at her summer home in 
Falmouth after being ill 
with cancer for three years. 

She was chief assessor 
for the City of Boston from 
1976 to 1980 and served as 
former Boston Mayor 
Kevin White's chief 
administrative assistant 
during much of White's 
tenure. She was 
responsible for all 
contracts entered into by 
the city. 

More recently, she had 
practiced law in Boston 
with her husband, 
Lawrence C. Cameron, 
retired presiding justice of 
the South Boston District 
Court. 

A 1944 graduate of 
Emmanuel College, she 
entered Suffolk University 
Law School 20 years later. 
After attending night 
courses, she graduated in 
the top 10 percent of her 
class. 



She graduated from 
Girls Latin School in 
Boston and early in her 
career taught in the Boston 
schools. She had also 
worked for Blue 
Cross/Blue Shield before 
practicing law with her 
husband. 

She enjoyed skiing, 
sailing, traveling and 
needlepoint and was an 
avid reader. 

Mrs. Cameron was a 
member of the 
Massachusetts and 
American Bar 

Associations and of 
various alumnae 

associations. 

She is also survived by 
several nieces and 
nephews. 

Burial was in 
Massachusetts National 
Cemetery, Bourne. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the John J. 
O'Connor & Son Funeral 
Home, Dorchester. 

Donations may be made 
to St. Francis House for 
the Homeless, P.O. Box 
499, Essex Station, 
Boston, MA 02112. 



Norman Christie, 69 

A.L.A. Saleman For 20 Years 



Gertrude G. Gray, 74 

Worked For Purity Supreme 



A funeral Mass for 
Gertrude G. (Duby) Gray, 
74, of Quincy, was 
celebrated Tuesday in St. 
Ann's Church. 

Mr. Gray died July 23 at 
home. 

She had worked as a 
clerk for Purity Supreme 
Markets for 20 years. 

Born in Warren, R.L, 
she lived in Quincy for 20 
years. 



Wife of the late John J. 
Gray, she is survived by 
three sisters-in-law, 
Margaret DeLang and 
Pauline Gray, both of 
Quincy, and Ellen Martin 
of Riverside, R.I. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



A private funeral 
service for Norman 
Christie, 69, of Quincy, 
was held. 

Mr. Christie died July 
20 at Quincy Hospital. 

He was a salesman for 
A.L.A. on the South Shore 
for about 20 years before 
his retirement. 

Born in Quincy, he 
lived in Quincy 



approximately 20 years. 

He is survived by his 
wife, Dolores (Cavanaugh) 
Christie; and a daughter, 
Maya Christie of Quincy. 

Burial was in 
Gethsemane Cemetery, 
West Roxbury. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Keohane 
Funeral Home, 785 
Hancock St. 



Ann Connors, 104 



Adriana DeNicola, 85 



A funeral Mass for 
Adriana "Lena" (Russo) 
DeNicola, 85, of Quincy, 
was celebrated yesterday 

(Wednesday) in St. John's 
Church. 

Mrs. DeNicola died July 
24 at home. 

Bom in Boston, she 
lived most of her life in 
Quincy and was a 1926 
graduate of Quincy High 
School. 

She is survived by her 
husband, Luigi DeNicola; 
a son, Francis T. DeNicola 



of Weymouth; a daughter, 
Luisa Maclnnis of West 
Harwich; a brother, Frank 
Russo of Weymouth; a 
sister, Mary Tenore of 
Weymouth; 1 1 

grandchildren, and two 
great-granddaughters. She 
was the mother of the late 
Arnold A. DeNicola. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Bolea- 
Buonfiglio Funeral Home, 
116 Franklin St. 



A fiineral Mass for Ann 
Connors, 104, of Quincy, 
was celebrated July 22 in 
St. John's Church. 

Miss Connors died July 
20 at Logan Health Care 
Facility in Weymouth 
after a long illness. 

She was a former 
employee at Old Colony 
Laundry. 

A lifelong Quincy 
resident, she was educated 
in Quincy schools. 

She is survived by a 



nephew, John O'Brien of 
Braintree; two nieces, 
Marjorie Yelmokas of 
Sharon and Mary Gordon 
of Pocasset; and many 
other nieces and nephews. 
She was the sister of the 
late Cecelia Keeley of 
Quincy. 

Burial was in St Mary's 
Cemetery, Randolph. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 



Josephine M. Megnia, 63 



Phillip H. Callan Jr., 55 



A funeral Mass for 
Philip H. Callan Jr., 55, of 
Quincy, was celebrated 
July 23 in St. John's 
Church. 

Mr. CaUan died July 20 
at Boston City Hospital 
after a brief illness. 

A Marine Corps 
veteran, he was a lifelong 
resident of Quincy. 

He is survived by his 
mother, Louise (Norrie) 
Perfetuo of Braintree; and 



two sisters, Cynthia (J. 
Ward of Rockland and 
Jym Ann Curtis of 
Braintree. He was the son 
of the late Philip H. 
Callan. 

Burial was in Mt. 
Wollaston Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Funeral Home, 74 Elm St. 

Donations may be made 
to Father Bill's Place, 
Broad St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



A funeral Mass for 
Josephine M. (Wyse) 
Megnia, 63, of Quincy, 
was celebrated July 24 in 
St. Boniface Church. 

Mrs. Megnia died July 
19 at St. Joseph's Hospital 
in Denver. 

Born and educated in 
Boston, she was a 
graduate of the Burdett 
Business School and hved 
many years in Dorchester 
before moving to Quincy 
28 years ago. 

Wife of the late Robert 
H. Megnia, she is survived 
by four sons, John J. 
Megnia and Robert M. 
Megnia of Marshfield, 
Joseph Megnia of 
Somerville and James F. 
Megnia of Quincy; four 
daughters, Mary Megnia- 
Connors and Jodi Megnia 
of Quincy, Catherine A. 
Craig of Hull and Susan 



Reidy of Weymouth; two 
brothers, Edmund Wyse of 
Milton and James Wyse of 
Dorchester; three sisters, 
Mary McGann of 
Randolph and Catherine 
Macheras and Margaret 
McCarthy, both of Quincy; 
and 10 grandchildren. 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. 

Funeral arrangements 
were by the Sweeney 
Brothers Home for 

Funerals, 1 Independence 
Ave. 

Donations may be made 
to St. Boniface Church, 26 
Shed St., Quincy, MA 
02169. 



American Heart 
Association 




Religion 



Bethany Congregational 



A morning worship 
service with Holy 
Communion will be held 
Sunday at 10 a.m. at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church, Spear and 
Coddington Sts., Quincy 
Center. 

A guest minister, the 
Rev. Ann Rearick, will 
conduct the service and 
preach a sermon entitled 
"God's Love - the Basis of 
Our Hope and Peace." She 
is the chaplain at Quincy 



Hospital. 

Scripture reader will be 
Lisa Lundin. Members of 
the Board of Deacons and 
Deaconesses will assist 
the minister in serving 
communion. 

Musical portions of the 
worship service will 
feature a duet, Connie 
MacDonald and Joanne 
French, with Gregory 
Flynn, organist. Greeting 
the worshipers will be Jean 
and Winslow Bettinson. 



Covenant Congregational 



At the 10:45 worship 
service of the Covenant 
Congregational Church, 
Whitwell and Granite Sts., 
the Diaconate will serve 
Communion. 

Rev. LuAnn Johnson 
will officiate and preach. 
She will continue her 
sermon series on spiritual 
wholeness. 

An attended nursery is 
available for children age 
four and younger. The 
attendants are Don and 



Erica Johnson. 

Immediately following 
the service, coffee will be 
served in the fellowship 
ball downstairs. 

Sunday School is not 
meeting every Sunday, but 
one of the activities 
planned for the summer is 
a trip to see the Pawtucket 
Red Sox on Aug. 14. 

For more information 
about any of the church's 
activities, call the church 
office at 479-5728. 



United Methodist 



The Rev. Harry Soper 
Jr. will preach on "Hands 
Are Needed" at the 10 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Quincy 

Community United 
Methodist Church, 40 
Beale St. 

Music will be led by 
Scott Walker, choir 
director. Greeters will be 
Katheryn Emerson and 



Kathryn White. Ushers will 
be Gayle and Michael 
Johnson. 

Hostesses at the 
fellowship hour in 
Susannah Wesley Hall 
will be Phyllis Hawes, 
Olga Hawkins, Anne 
Kjellander and Margery 

Rund. 

Church facilities are 
handicapped accessible 
and child care is available. 



Quincy Point Congregational 



The Rev. Fred Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will preach 
on "When God Seems So 
Very Far Away!" at the 10 
a.m. worship service 
Sunday at Quincy Point 
Congregational Church, 
Washington St. and 
Southern Artery. 

The Rev. Carol Atwood- 
Lyon, pastor, will serve as 
liturgist. Child care is 
provided each Sunday at 
10 a.m. for infants and 
children up to seven years 
of age. All other children 



are encouraged to worship 
with their parents. 

Greeter will be Doug 
Anderson, Deacon. Ushers 
will be Ted DeCristofaro, 
Betty DeCristofaro, Carol 
Bissett, Janet Smith, 
Thelma Burgess and 
Suzanne Hourin. Tellers 
will be Karen Keams, Ron 
Keams, Jean Kane, Jim 
O'Neill, Marcia O'Neill 
and Jim Tavema. Music 
will be led by Dr. Herman 
Weiss, organist and choir 
director. 



Houghs Neck Congregational 



Rabbi David Jacobs of 
Temple Beth El in Quincy 
will be guest speaker at 
the 9:30 a.m. worship 
service at Houghs Neck 
Congregational Church 
Sunday. 

Edwina Robinson will 
lead the worship. Music 



will be by Janet Little, 
flautist, accompanied by 
Arden Schofield, organist. 
Ron Lemieux will greet 
those attending service. 

Following the service 
all are invited to attend 
the coffee hour in the 
Conference Room. 




\ 



Church of 
Saint John 
the Baptist 

44 School St, Quincy, MA 

MASS SCHEDULE 

Saturday 4:00 & 7:00 pm 
Sunday: 7 am, 
9 am, 11 am, 
; 12:30 and 5:30 pm 
Confessions in Chapel Sat. 3-3:45 pm 
k^Rectory-21 Gay St. 773-1021 



Page 14 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 29, 1993 



Sun Sports 



Legion Baseball 



Morrisette Opens Defense 
Of State Championship 



By TOM SULLIVAN 

The Morrisette Legion 
baseball team was 
scheduled to open defense 
of its state championship 
Tuesday night against 
Needham at Adams Field 
after winning its second 
straight outright Zone 6 
title. Morrisette also 
shared the zone crown 
with Braintree in 1990 and 
1991. 

The second game of the 
Needham series was also 
scheduled for Adams last 
night (Wednesday), as the 
Needham field was 
unavailable, and the third 
game, if necessary, will 
also be at Adams tonight 
(Thursday) at 7:30. 

Morrisette fmished the 
regular season at 14-2-2, 
winning its last nine 
games in a row and 
finished with an 
unprecedented 13-0 record 
at Adams Field. 

Braintree finished 
second in Zone 6 and 
faced Bridgewater in its 
state opener, while 
Randolph finished third 
and opened against 
Sandwich. 

Morrisette won all three 
of its games last week, a 
10-2 win over Milton, a 
13-0 romp over Randolph 
and a nine-inning 2-1 
victory over West 
Roxbury. 

The finale with West 
Roxbury was the first test 
for Morrisette in its last 
nine games as both teams 
featured clutch pitching 
and outstanding defense. 

Matt O'Toole of 
Morrisette and Mike Hauk 
of W. Roxbury hooked up 
in a fine pitchers' duel. 
Hauk, a crafty southpaw, 
had defeated Morrisette, 3- 



1, earlier, one of 
Morrisette's two losses. 

Morrisette had 13 hits 
in eight innings but 
stranded 14 runners as 



Shea and Reinhart two and 
Kane Schnabel, Hayes and 
Malvesti one each. 

In the romp over 
Randolph, Mike Patch 



Hauk got the big out when pitched five strong innings, 

he needed it. allowing five hits, striking 

West Roxbury scored out seven and walking 

its lone run, unearned, in only one. It improved his 

the third on a double and record to 4-1. Sean 

an error. Dolbeare and Malvesti 

Morrisette tied it when pitched the final two 

O'Toole, Robbie Kane and innings, Dolbeare striking 

Serge Belcastro singled. out the side and MalvesU 



It remained that way 
until the second extra 
inning when Pat Bryan 
relieved O'Toole, who has 
been lifted for a pinch 
runner. 



striking out two. 

Morrisette had 13 hits 
and put the game out of 
reach with a seven-run 
second inning. Shea, Kane 
and Adam Calvert had 



W. Roxbury loaded the three hits apiece, Danny 
bases with no outs on a Duncan a triple and Chris 
missed third strike, Cotter, Reinhart and 
misjudged fly ball and an Schnabel singles, 
outfield error. But two Sean Donovan 

outstanding throws from improved his record to 3-1- 
shortstop Tommy Malvesti 1 in the game against 
on ground balls forced both Milton, allowing two 
runners at the plate and a earned runs, striking out 
strikeout ended the threat, two and walking two in six 

In the bottom of the innings.. Bryan pitched the 
inning Dave Reinhart seventh, striking out two 
tripled to deep right field and walking one. 
and, after Jay Schnabel Morrisette again had 13 
and Brian Hayes were hits with Hayes having 
walked intentionally, three, Schnabel two 
Malvesti hit a sacrifice fly doubles, Belcaztro a 
to left center to drive in double and single, 
the winning run. Malvesti two hits and 

O'Toole (4-0) has Kane, Reinhart, Shea and 
allowed only three earned Donovan one each, 
runs in 31 innings for an "We have been playing 
0.70 ERA. Bryan picked up excellent ball and I hope 
his first Legion victory, we can keep it up in the 
Morrisette had three more playoffs," said coach Dave 
double plays for a record- Perdios, who led 
setting 24 for the season. Morrisette into the state 

Belcastro and O'Toole playoffs for the fourth year 
had three hits each, Pat in a row. 

Youth Soccer Coaches Sought 

Quincy Youth Soccer is Application deadline is 

seeking applicants to Aug. 9. Further information 

coach travel league teams can be obtained by calling 

for the 1993-94 seasons. Russ Comer at 471-6804. 



AUGUST 1993 

QUINCY RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Summer Sports Camps & Instructional Workshops 

OUR 11th YEAR! 

DANCE CAMP: Age: 7-12, AUGUST 2-6, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, 
Cost: $30.00, Camp Director: Julie Ann Grover. 

CHEERLEADING CAMP: Age: 8 to High School, August 9-1 3, 9:00 
a.m.-l 2:30 p.m. Cost: $30.00, Camp Directors: Patti Myers and Anita 
Curran. 

TRACK, FIELD AND DISTANCE CAMP: Age 8 to High School, 
August 9-1 3, 8:00 a.1 2:00 noon. Cost: $30.00, Camp Director: Geoff 
Hennessey. 

ARTS /CRAFTS CAMP: Age: 8-12, August 16-20, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 
p.m. Cost: $30.00, Camp Director: Ann Howie. 

VOLLEYBALL CAMP: Age 12-18, August 23-27, 8:30 a.m.-l 2:30 
p.m.. Cost: $30.00, Camp Director: Tom Henderson. 

REGISTRATION 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM 
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 

100 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
Phone 376-1 -FUN 




THESE Quincy and North Quincy girls led the Metro girls' scholastic voUeybaU team to 
its third straight gold medal in the recent Bay State Games. Left to right, Wendy 
Sweetser (North Quincy), Maureen McCarthy (NQ), Linda Jellison (NQ), Sara Stanton 
(NQ), Kristen Priscella (Quincy) and Jaime Graham (Quincy). 



Volleyball 



Quincy Girls Lead 

Metro Team To Third 

Straight Gold Medal 



Six Quincy girls led the 
Metro girls' scholastic 
volleyball team to its third 
straight Bay State Gaines 
gold medal. 

Maureen McCarthy was 
the top performer for the 
Metro girls, who defeated 
Coastal, 2-1 (9-15, 15-10, 
15-11) in the semifinal 
medal round and went on 



to top Northeast, 2-0 (15-6, 
15-9) for the gold medal. 

McCarthy of North 
Quincy High demonstrated 
strong offensive play, both 
setting and hitting. Sara 
Stanton of North Quincy 
had outstanding net play 
with several key blocks 
and spikes. 

Combined with Linda 
Jellison 's (North Quincy) 



fantastic defense and 
thunderous spikes from the 
outside made Metro's front 
court unstoppable. 

Kristen Presicella's 
(Quincy) team spirit and 
solid play contributed 
heavily to the success of 
the team. Wendy Sweetser 
of North and Jaime 
Graham of Quincy both 
turned in solid play. 



Junior Baseball 



All-Stars Split Pair 
In Invitational Tourney 



Quincy's 12-year-old 
all-stars split a pair of 
games over the past 
weekend in the Milford 
Little League invitational 
tournament. 

In Quincy's first game 
Chris Bregoli pitched a 
one-hitter and struckout 13 
in a 10-0 victory over 
Marlboro. 

Quincy scored four runs 
in the fourth inning as 
Kevin WaLsh led off with a 
single, Bregoli doubled 
him in and Mike Powers 
singled home Bregoli. Jose 



Always Buying 
New & Old 

TAJ 

COIN, 

STAMPS 

and 

SPORTS CARDS 

9 Maple St., 
Quincy, MA 02169 

479-1652 

Complete Line of Sifplies 



Diaz singled in Powers 
and Shawn Manning drove 
in Diaz. 

Quincy added four in 
the fifth with Diaz, 
Manning and Billy Walker 
bitting back-to-back 
doubles. 

Diaz had three hits, 
Walsh, Bregoli and 
Powers two each and Ryan 
Barrett had a double. 
Bregoli was named the 
game's MVP. 

Quincy was held to five 
hits as it lost to 
Middleboro, 7-3. 

Quincy took a 1-0 lead 
as Walsh walked and 
scored on Powers' double. 
Quincy took a 3-1 lead as 
Bregoli hit a two-run 



homer to right center in 
the third. 

Qumcy's Manning was 
cruising along with a two- 
hitter through three innings 
but Middleboro tied it with 
two runs in the fourth. 

Middleboro then took 
the lead for good as Brqno 
Bower hit a three-run 
homer to center. Walker 
relieved Manning and 
gave up the seventh run. 

Daley and Barrett had 
the other Quincy hits and 
again Bregoh was named 
the game's MVP. 

Quincy was scheduled 
to play Tuesday in the 
double elimination tourney 
and ,if it won, it will play 
again on Friday. 



Helen Reaney Wins 
Ponkapoag Tournament 



t 



A bingle, bangle, 
bungle tournament was 



SAVE GAS 

AND MONEY.. 

SHOP LOCALLY 



held by the Women's 
Division of the 
Ponnkapoag Golf Course 
with Helen Reaney 
finishing first, Nancy 

Carlton second. Peg 
Cowie third, Pat Mahoney 
and Laura Lynch tying for 
fourth and Mary Michaels, 
Edna Tenney and Jennie 
Pentz tying for sixth. 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sun Page IS 



Quincy Track Club 
Wins All-star Meet 



The Quincy Track Club 
used depth and balance to 
score a major victory in 
the first Needham All-Star 
Invitational track and field 
meet. 

Quincy won with 619 
points, followed by the 
Needham Track Qub with 
582, the Greater Lowell 
Road Runners with 318 
and the Lexington 
Lightning with 217. 

Although Quincy won 
only the 9-10 girls' 
division, it dominated the 
throws and kept close in 
every other event as well 
as taking four of eight 
relay races to clinch the 
victory. 

"We spend a lot of time 
with throwing events," said 
Quincy director Geoff 
Hennessy. There are 14 
different events in track 
and we try to find the right 
event for each kid. There 
were only three races all 
night in which we didn't 
have a score. Seventy-five 
kids represented the club 
and only the host 
Needham team had more 
athletes." 

The format required that 
only one athlete per club 
could compete, although 
Quincy and Needham had 
a few extra in the field 
events and longer races. 

"It was a great night for 
the kids and Needham put 
on a super meet," 
Hennessy said. 

Quincy, with 400 
members, will complete 
its summer action with the 
Needham Youth Classic 
and the 18th annual Prank 
Kelly Memorial Meet Aug. 
7. 

Quincy scorers in the 
Needham All-Star meet: 

1500 meters: 8 and 
under boys, won by Ryan 
Lynch (6:24.97); 9-10 
boys, John McCarthy, 
second; 9-10 girls, 
Maureen O'Brien, second; 
11-12 boys, John Lynch, 
first (5:50.26); 11-12 girls, 
Laura Hamilton, third; 13- 
14 girls, Kelly Duggan, 
third. 

100 meters: 8 and under 
boys, Danny Ngutter, 
second; 8 and under girls, 
Maura Blaney, fourth; 9-10 



Softball 



gills, Kim Holmes, third; 
11-12 boys, Chris 
Licciardi, third; 11-12 
girls, Kim Hueith, third; 
13-14 boys, Kevin 
Connolly, first (12.94); 13- 
14 girls, Phyllis Poon, 
second. 

400 meters: 8 and 
under boys, Kevin 
HoUeran, first (1:25.0); 8 
and under girls, Katie 
Mercurio, second; 9-10 
boys, Emmanuel Kalu, 
first (1:11.78); 9-10 girls, 
Kelly Rose O'Brien, first 
(1:14.92); 11-12 boys, Tim 
Pezzulo, third; 11-12 girls, 
Monika Gogols, second; 
13-14 boys, Justin Doty, 
second; 13-14 girls, 
Jessica Gogola, second. 

200 meters: 8 and 
under boys, Casey Bell, 
second; 8 and under girls, 
Erin McFarland, second: 
9-10 boys, Bryan Thornton, 
first (32.45); 9-10 girls. 
Colleen Lahar, third; 11-12 
boys, Joe Watson, third; 
11-12 girls, Julianne 
Battaglia, third; 13-14 
boys, Jimmy Finn, first 
(27.62); 13-14 girls, Emily 
Eddy, third. 

800 meters: 8 and 
under boys, Tim Mullen, 
first (3:33.76); 8 and under 
girls, Brenna O'Brien, first 
(3:23.20); 9-10 boys, 
Sebastian Gogola, first 
(3:03.50); 9-10 girls, 
Maureen O'Brien, first 

(3:17.44; 11-12 boys, Mike 
Buckley, first (3:00.00); 
11-12 girls, Yvette Molina, 
first (2:37.86); 13-14 boys, 
Justin Doty, third; 13-14 
girls, Erin Barry, second. 

Shot put: 8 and under 
boys, Paul Grazioso, 
second; 8 and under girls, 
Christina Conley, second; 
9-10 boys, Kyle Piazza, 
first (24-5); 9-10 girls, 
Jennifer Conley, first (17 
1/2); 11-12 boys, Joe 
Watson, first (22-5 1/2); 
11-12 girls, Kim Huerth, 
first (24-6 3/4); 13-14 
boys, Kevin Connolly, 
second; 13-14 girls, Jen 
Pineo, first (32-6 3/4). 

Long jump: 8 and 
under boys, Casey Bell, 
third; 8 and under girls, 
Katie Mercurio, second; 9- 
10 boys, Joe Holleran, 
third; 9-10 girls, Jennifer 
Djerf, second; 11-12 boys. 



Chris Licciardi, second; 
11-12 girls, Sarah 
Houghton, fourth; 13-14 
boys Pat Egan, first (15-3 
1/2); 13-14 girls, Courtney 
Paquette, third. 

Javelin: 9-10 boys, 
Danny Spillane, second; 9- 
10 girls. Erica Bell, 
second; 11-12 boys, 
Maxim Olivier, second; 
11-12 girls, Moe Holleran, 
first (31-0); 13-14 boys, 
Aaron Marshall, second; 
13-14 girls, Claire Quilty, 
first (55-5). 

Discus: 9-10 boys, 
Andrew Martorano, 
second; 9-10 girls, Jennifer 
Conley, second; 11-12 
boys, Chi Chung, first (60- 
7); 11-12 girls, Lisa Delia 
Croce, first (40-7); 13-14 
boys, Jimmy Finn, second; 
13-14 girls, Marianne 
Blaikie, first (73-1). 

High jump: 8 and under 
boys, Ryan lynch, first (3- 
6); 8 and under girls, Erin 
McFarland, first (3-0); 9- 
10 boys, Bryan Thornton, 

second; 9-10 girls, Kelly 
Rose O'Brien, first (3-6);' 
11-12 boys, Mike Buckley, 
second; 11-12 girls, 
Monica Gogola, third, 13- 
14 boys, Pat Egan, first (5- 
6); 13-14 girls, Erin Barry, 
second. 

4x100 relay: 8 and 
under boys, Quincy, 
second; 8 and under girls, 
Quincy, second; 9-10 boys, 
Quincy, first (1:05.63); 9- 
10 girls, Quincy, first 
(1:05.48); 11-12 boys, 
Quincy, third; 11-12 girls, 
Quincy, first (1:00.68); 13- 
14 boys, Quincy, first 
(:52.29); 13-14 girls, 
second. 

The following extra 
Quincy athletes competed: 

9-10 boys 800, Dave 
Buckley; 9-10 girls 800, 
Maggie Ketcham; 11-12 
boys 1500, Giegg Walsh; 
11-12 1500, DanieUe Evju; 
13-14 girls 1500, Erin 
Djerf; 11-12 girls high 
jump, Meghan Spillane; 
13-14 girls shot put, Kristy 
Deptula; 9-10 girls long 
jump, Katie McLeod; 13- 
14 girls javelin, Christine 
Partridge; 11-12 girls' 
discus, 

12 girls' discuss, Jackie 
Chapman. 



Washington In First 



Washington Tap I 
moved back into first 
place in the B Division of 
the Quincy Men's Softball 
League with a 17-3 victory 
over Washington Tap II 
and a 3-0 decision over 
Beau's Place. 

In the all-Tap game 
pitcher Matt Marks 

improved his record to 7-3 
and went 3-for-3 at the 
plate. Todd Fihciccia also 
went 3-for-3 with three 
RBI, John McNanus 2-for- 
2 with three RBI, Bob 
lerardi 2-for-2 with an RBI, 
Mike Ash a solo home run 
and a long double and two 



RBI, Joe Prendiville three- 
run homer, Mike Bates a 
three-run double, Brian 
Salley a two-run double, 
Mike Ainsley two hits, 
Charlie Hicks two hits and 
Dennis LaCortea single. 

For Tap II Bob McCabe 
had an inside-the-park 
home run. 

In the win over Beau's 
Larry McGue pitched a 
two-hitter to improved to 
8-2. 

Ainsley had an RBI 
triple and a single. Ash 
and RBI single and Hicks, 
lerardi, Filiciccia, Joe 
Godfrey and Ron Colon 
singles. 



Steve Spencer pitched 
well for Beau's and Mark 
Taylor and Andy Kelly had 
hits. 

In the C Division 
Liberty Lounge tied the 
league record of 21 
straight wins with a come- 
from-behind 14-11 win 
over Washington Tap and 
a 15-5 decision over Hat 
Rack. 

Bob Hennelly (11-0) 
and Kevin Nester (10-0) 
pitched strong games. 

Liberty tried for a 
league record 22 straight 
Tuesday night against 
Shooters II. 



Police Vs. Sheriffs Dept, Officials Vs. Media 

Koch Memorial Softball 
Doubleheader Aug. 5 



The sixth aiuiual Dick 
Koch Memorial MDA 
Softball Doubleheader will 
be played Thursday, Aug. 
5 at Adams Field, off 
Southern Artery, Quincy. 

The first game features 
the Quincy Police versus 
the Norfolk County 
Sheriff's Department at 
6:30 p.m. 

In the nightcap, the 
Quincy City Officials club 
will face the local News 
Media All-Stars at 8 p.m. 

Tickets for the twin-bill 
are $2 each and include 
admission to both games 
and entry into a prize 
drawing. 

Prizes include a pair of 
Red Sox tickets, a 
baseball glove donated by 
Colman's Sporting Goods 
of Quincy, tee-shirts and 
free pay-per-view movies 



from Continental 

Cablevision of Quincy. 
Gift certificates to local 
restaurants will also be 
awarded. 

All proceeds will 
benefit the Muscular 
Dystrophy Association. To 
date, the game has raised 
$23,200 in the fight 
against muscular diseases, 
including $1,500 last year. 

This year's 

doubleheader marks the 
17th year of the event 
which has become a 
summer tradition in 
Quincy. Six years ago, the 
game was renamed and 
dedicated to the memory 
of the late Richard Koch 
Sr. who organized the 
benefit game. 

Mr. Koch served with 
Henry Bosworth as co- 
chairman of the Quincy- 



South Shore Labor Day 
Telethon Committee. The 
committee has raised more 
than $1 milhon in the fight 
against MDA. 

Quincy Community 
Television Channel 3 will 
set up a broadcast booth at 
Adams Field for the 
doubleheader. The games 
will air on Channel 3 at a 
time and date to be 
aimounced. 

Tickets are available at 
the mayor's office, City 
Hall; Quincy Continental 
Cablevision, School St., 
WJDA, Brackett St.; and 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 
Hancock St., Quincy 
Center. Tickets will also 
be sold before the games 
at the Adams Held gate. 

Rain date is Thursday, 
Aug. 12. 



Frank Kelly Meet Aug. 7 



The annual Frank Kelly 
Memorial Track Meet will 
be held Saturday, Aug. 7 
at 9:30 a.m. at Veterans 
Memorial Stadium. 

Registration fee is $5. 
Ribbons will go to the top 
five finishers in each 
event. A participant will 
be Hmited to two events. 

The meet is open to 
Squirts (born 1985-86), 

Bantams (born 1983-84) 
and Youth (bom 1979-80). 
There will be a working 



concession stand all day 
long. 

Further information can 



be obtained by calling 
Geoff Hennessy at 773 
5824. 



Merrymount Softball Sunday 

The Merrymount ^j ^ p ^^ at Perkins 
Association softball 
season will start Sunday Field. 




U.S. SAVINGS BONOS 



GRAND OPENING CONTINUES 




Our Full - Serve Gas Station has five blends of 
gasoline available for your automotive needs. 

We are going back to the basics, remember the good 

old days of service at the pumps. 

Well, they're backatthe one-stop-gas station. We will 

wash your windows, check your oil and check your tire 

pressure. 

Our attendants will greet and service you with a smile 
at the One-Stop-Gas Station. 



Professional, knowlegeable certified technicians 

We do the job right the first time! 



Petars 
AutomotJA^ 



(61 7) 786-9080 (61 7) 472-6759 

324-330 Quincy Ave., Quincy 




mm wmwmmwmmwmimm 



Fully Authorized Car Care Center 

WE DO IT ALL! 



Page U Quincy Sun Thursday, July 29, 1993 



«N 



396 On Honor Roil 
At North Quincy Higii 



North Quincy High 
School lists 3% students 
on the fouith quarter honor 
roU. 

They are: 

Distinction 

Grade 9: Kcrri Anastas, 
Sonia Au, Annie Bergen, Cui 
Chen, Helen Clien. Yan 
Clien, Valerie Chin, John 
Cleary, Gregory Conway, 
Denise Dieu, Julie Diplacido, 
Kelly Duggan, Ian Foley. 
Vikrant Cadre. Melissa 
Greene. Michael Griffin. 
Maria lorio. Dawn Jacobs. 
Linda Jellison, Uchechi Kalu, 
Pui Keung, Amy Laplume, 
David Lee. Yim Lee, Vincent 
Leung, Jason Liu, Benny Ma, 
Brendan Maness, Robert 
Mantia. John Marinilli. 
Patrick McDonagh, Andrew 
Myers, Suk Ng, Hoa Nguyen. 
Phi Nguyen, Tu Nguyen, 
Debika Paul, Phyllis Poon, 
Christine Regan, Lisa Renzi, 
Stephen Ridge, Terrence 
Roche, Carolyn Rolfe, 
Amalia Solano, Sara Stanton, 
Kevin Sullivan, Andry 
Sutanto, Khanh Ta. Ka Tarn, 
Joanna Timbone, Thuong 
Tran-Thuong, Yao Wu, Dong 
Yang, Wan Yang. Abby Zhu, 
Cindy Zhu. 

Grade 10: Gordon Au, 
Angela Bohl, Jacqueline 
Bradford, Patrick Callahan, 
Cynthia Chen, Amy Detwilcr, 
Diane Dinocco, Ken Goon, 
Bradley Gray, Kathleen 
Healey, Malther Hourin. 
Regina Hunter, Kimberly 
Jurevitch, Vivian Kam. Wai 
Lau, Samson Lee. Randy 
Leung. Jennifer Liu, Karen 
Moy, My Ngu, Nhut Nguyen, 
Elisabeth O'Donnell. John 
Pappas, Kristen Proudc, 
Amey Riley, Danielle 
Rinella. Melissa Roberts. 
Meghan Roche, Jami 
Sacchetti, Karen Shea, 
Megan Shea, Erin Skehan. 
Artemis Spyridonidis, Yi 
Tarn, Patricia Trayers, Maria 
Villanueva, Tung Vu, Kristen 
Wilson, Sigrid Wohlrab, Qi 
Ye. 

Grade 11: Zoe Bohl, 
Barry Canavan, Amy Chan, 
Eddy Chan, Ying Chan, Jim 
Chen, Ricky Cheng, 
Samantha Chiu, Kelly Choi, 
Katy Deady, Justine 
Fagerlund, Winnie Fong. 
Travis Greenwood, Nathaniel 
Hcdvat, Nick Kesaris, Alta 
Lee, Zhen Lin. Maureen 
McCarthy, Cam Nguyen, 
David Pacino, Samuel Poon, 
Amy Shea, Heather 
Simmons, Wendy Sweetser, 
Kaling Tarn, Oanh Thai. Eric 
Torvi, Pamela Trafton, 
Carolyn Wong, Om Yos, Eric 
Yu, Wai Yung. 

Grade 12: Donella 
Belanger, Jennifer Brams, 
David Chan, Jenny Chan, Lan 
Chiu, Cindy Choi, Ken Chow, 
Laura Christopherson. Clinton 



Clarke. liana Cobban, 
Melissa Costales. Sean 
Donovan, Joanna Dyer, 
Jeffrey Earnest, Leilah 
Eklund, Kerry Evans, Jackson 
Fong. Kathleen Groom. 
Susanne Hamilton. Jessica 
Hoel, Jeffrey Jones, Tanya 
Kutasz. Keith Lentini, 
Suzanne Lewis, Angela 
Marinilli, Kathleen 

McDonald, Regina Murphy, 
Linh Ngu, Dorothy Ngutter, 
Kim Nguyen, Joshua 
O'Donnell, Shelia 

O'Donoghue, Tracy 

O'SuUivan, Krista Olson, 
Jean Pacifico, Miyon Park. 
Thu Pham, Kevin Price, 
Mehnda Roberts, Mark Scott, 
Patrick Shea, Mark Sinclair, 
William Sit, Johnathan 
Stotlcr, Christopher Sullivan, 
Shu Tan, Jennifer Walker, 
Sean Warren. Edward Wong. 
High Honors 

Grade 9: Christine Aiello, 
Jeffrey Baldock, Cassandra 
Beck, Christine Cardillo, 
Tyrus Gordon, Michael 
Hannon. Sean Hughes, Jimmy 
Lee, Jimmy Liang, Kenneth 
Lippens, Cara Mulcahy, Guy 
Nguyen, Paul Princiotto. 
George Regas, David 
Risitano, Vincent Szeto, Judy 
Wong. 

Grade 10: Kate 

Bellnnich. Susan Brams, 
Thomas Bro.snan. Sandra 
Capone, Jason Carlevale, 
Alyssa Cobban, Sean 
Dolbeare, Jamie Ennis, 
Michelle George, Jennifer 
Gullins, Kim Ho, Ngan Ho. 
Neil Kiley, Jed Kingsbury, 
Julie McDonald, Shcri 
McLellan. Kerry Monahan. 
William Ngutter, Paul 
O'Brien, Julie Sullivan, Judy 
Wong. 

Grade 11: Amy Barry, 
Diana Charam, Jason Chin, 
Zachariah Costa, Darrell 
Earnest, Warren Fong, Leo 
Hughes, Kristine Kabilian, 
Ann Kadlick, Christopher 
Look, Lisa Moulton, Diep 
Nguyen, Nicola Perona, 
Michael Santoro, Mateo 
Solano. 

Grade 12: Esther 
Alexander, Brian Anderson, 
Jennifer Barbuto, Julie 
Barbuto, Kevin Boylen, 
Christina Campbell, Jenny 
Chan, Louis Chan, Sean 
Chan, Mei Chen, Joanne 
Curreri, Loren Gates, Calece 
Greeley, Cristos lorio, 
Georgia Kesaris, Wai Lau, 
Brendon Lydon, Patricia 
Meighan, Michael Patch, 
Robert Shaw, Robert Smith, 
Jo- Anne Sprague, Rebecca 
Squires, Mindy Tso, Pui Yan. 
Honors 

Grade 9: Christina 
Amate, Renee Anastos, 
Christian Antoniazzi, 
Anthony Attardo, Michelle 

BoUino, King Cheng, Jeffrey 
Coleman, Gregg Constantino, 



Brad Currie, Michael 
Ferguson, Elizabeth 
Fitzpatrick, Kristen Green, 
Aja Jackson, Catherine 
Jordan, Kelly Keegan, Kristen 
Kelley, Ann Lam, Eric Lam, 
Mark Lawn, Chandra Leister, 
Albeit Man, Elice McCallum, 
Shannon McCauley, Mary 
Patch. Jennifer Pineo, Nicole 
Pyne, Willie Quan. 
Christopher Ritchie, Daniel 
Stone, Kimberly Sudenfield, 
Shu Tan. 

Grade 10: Shawn Burke, 
Robert Callow, Julie Carthas, 
Richard Cram, April 
Dalrymple, Gregory DiBella. 
Joseph Donnelly, William 
Dugas, Erin Ga.spa, Scoit 

Graham. Michelle Hamilton, 
Stephen Heroux, James 
Karvelis, Steven Koch, Eric 
Lee, Angela Lippens, Jaime 
Monahan, Deborah 

O'Donnell, David Scott, Sean 
Spencer, Jennifer Teahan, 
Melissa Wilson, Michael 
Wilson, Joshua Wingate. 

Grade 11: Mary Bergeron, 
Michelle Bragg, Stephanie 
Buckley, Timothy Carrol, 
Erin Duggan, Daniel Duncan, 
Marsha Gilmore, Lori Golden. 
Matthew Groom, Tracy Hoey, 
Kristina Jolly, Kenneth 
Korzeniowski, Hua Li. Leah 
Lomond. Brendan Mulcahy. 
Dennis Pateras, Pamela 
Psota. Joanna Regas, Martin 
Shields. Maria Sourmaidis, 
Maura Sugrue. Han Thai, 
Tara Valenti, Timothy 
Wassiege, George Wirtz. 

Grade 12: Robin 
Backman. Kevin Barrett. 
Shawna Bulman. James 
Campbell. Lynne Carter, 
Joanne Casey, Sheri Cherico, 
Deborah Chiu, Faith 
Deangelis, Kenneth Duddy, 
Christopher Dupill, Erin 
Flaherty, Stacy Flynn, 
Corinne Gilmartin, John 
Gladu, Jay Goodrich. Maik 
Goodwin. Stephanie Greene, 
Patricia Ham. Timothy 
Hannon. Jennifer Head. Lisa 
Healey. Cheryl Henault, 
Christine Howard. Andrew 
Kenney, Stephanie King. 
John Laing, Brian Layden, 
Patrick Layden. Gail Leahy, 
Karen Leary. Matthew Lee, 
Wing Lee, Gregory Mackay, 
Jennifer Marks, Nicholas 
Mastrogiacomo, Eileen 
McDonagh, Kelly Meade, 
Samantha Nim, Jennifer 
Nutley, Dawn O'Leaiy, Adam 
Pavidis, Jennifer Phipps, Julie 
Ramos, Lara Rines, Angela 
Sacchetti, Laami Sharp, Hao 
Tran, Kiet Tran, Christopher 
Walsh, Joshua Walty, 
Sheldon Wong. 

Special Students: John 
Bellia, Brian Brunstrom, 
Michael Hennessy, Frances 
Langley, Lisa Lydon. 
Michelle Mullen, Erin Riley, 
Stephen Skayne, Robert 
Wirtz. 



NQHS Coaciies Goif 
Tournament Set For Aug. 9 



The North Quincy High 
Coaches Association will 
hold a golf tournament 
Monday, Aug. 9, at 10 a.m. 
at Presidents Golf Course. 

The association is 
trying to raise funds to 
update the athletic 
equipment for North's 
athletic programs. 

The Florida-style, best 
ball tournament will 
feature two $10,000 hole- 
in-one prizes. On the par 3 



fourth hole a $10,000 car 
courtesy of Padula Auto 
Sales in Braintree can be 
woa 

On the par 3 13th hole a 
$10,000 stock portfolio 
courtesy of the Boston 
Investment Group is the 
prize. In addition, there 
will be prizes for the first 
and second low gross, 
longest drive for men and 
women and closest to the 
pin on all par 3 holes. 

Other sponsors are The 



Egg and I Restaurant, 
North Quincy High 
wrestling team, Dr. James 
McDonough, DDS, Clancy 
Brothers Pest Control, 
McSweeney and Son 
General Contractor, Misty 
Harbor Resort, N.H., 
Beacon Sporting Goods 
and Kam Privision, Inc. 

Anyone interested iu 
participating or sponsoring 
a hole is asked to call Jim 
Rendle at 773-8522. 




QUINCY'S PEPSI HOT Shot champions, front, left to right, Pat Bregoli, Colleen Kelly, 
Jan Conley and Joycelyn West. Back, Recreation Leader Nicole Manton, Mike Doyle, 
Geoff Meade, Kerry Ginty and Recreation Director Barry Welch. 




THE FINALISTS in Quincy's Pepsi Hot Shot competition. Front row, left to right, Jill 
Baker, Kevin Walsh, Craig Joyce, Tama Baker, Tom Doucette and Matt Clark. Second 
row. Amy Satkevich and Chris Bregoli. Third row. Recreation Leader Nicole Manton, 
Mike Santoro, Dave Gunther and Michelle Boudreau. 

6 City Cliamps In 
Hot Sliot Competition 



Six youngsters were 
crowned city champion in 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department's annual Pepsi 
Hot Shot competition. The 
program was conducted as 
part of the Quincy 
Recreation Supervised 
Playground Program on 21 
locations. 

Recreational Director 
Barry Welch noted that 
the event is made possible 
through the cooperation of 
the Milton Bottling Plant 
of Pepsi Cola. "There is no 
longer a national Pepsi 
Hot Shot," Welch 
explained. "However, 
Mike Feehily of Milton 
Pepsi has always been a 
supporter of the posiuve 
benefits of this youth 
activity and sees that we 
get Milton Pepsi support 



Golf 



with free Pepsi for all our 
district and city 
championships. 

Pepsi Hot shot is a one 
minute timed shoot off and 
boys and girls receive 
points by making shots 
from "hot spots"located at 
different areas of the court. 
There are three age groups 
for boys and girls. 

This years finalists are: 

Midget Boys: Matt 
Clark, Tom Doucette, 
Craig Joyce; 

Midget Girls: Jill 
Baker, Tama Baker; 

Junior Boys: Chris 
Bregoli, Kevin Walsh; 

Junior Girls: Ali 
Haddad, Amy Satkevich; 

Senior Boys: Dave 
Gunther, Mike Santoro; 

Senior Girls: 

Michelle Boudreau, Toni 
Kabililan 



This years champions 
are: 

Midget Boys: Pat 
Bregoli; 

Midget Girls: Colleen 
Kelly, Jen Conley; 

Junior Boys: Brian 
Doyle; 

Junior Girls: Jocelyn 
West; 

Senior Boys: Geoff 
Meade; 

Senior Girls: Kerry 
Ginty 

The event was 
conducted by Mike 
Connor, Bill Reardon, 
Michelle Drury and Nicole 
Manton, sports specialists 
for the Quincy Recreation 
Department. City 

Championship 
Coordinator, Ms. Nicole 
Manton, also presented 
gift certificates proved by 
Papa Gino's in Wollaston. 



Presidents Ladies Tourney Results 



The Presidents Golf 
Course Ladies' Association 
held a stroke play 
tournament last weekend. 

On Saturday Sue 
Martinelli had low net of 

69 and Margaret Murphy 

70 in Div. I; Carol Cahill 
had low net of 63 and Pat 
Hagan 69 in Div. II; 
Roberta McCann low net 
of 68 and Elaine Mooney 



74 in Div. Ill and Irene 
Lancione low net of 76 
and Dolly Barron 77 in 
Div. IV. 

Nancy DiCario Jr. was 
closest to the pin on the 
second hole and Carol 
Cahill on the 10th hole. 

On Sunday Margaret 
Murphy had low net of 63 
and Sue Martinelli 65 in 
Div. I; Carol Maglio and 



Moy a Baldwin tied at 67 
in Div II; Gigi Wallace 
low net of 69 and Roberta 
McCann 70 in Div. Ill and 
Florence Berke low net of 
72 and Peg Kelley 76 in 
Div.rV. 

Sandra Jordan was 
closest to the pin on the 
seventh hole and Moya 
Baldwin on the 18th hole. 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Dr. Zuhayr Hemady 
To Relocate Practice 



Dr. Zuhayr Hemady of 
the Nobili Allergy Clinic 
announces Chat he is 
relocating his practice to 
1261 Furnace Brook 
Pkwy., Suite 33, Quincy. 

Dr. Hemady is a 
graduate of the American 
University of Beirut in 
1975. He completed a 
three year residency 
program at Strong 
Memorial Hospital in 
Rochester, N.Y. He 
received his training in 
Allergy-Immunology (adult 
and pediatric) at Tufts 
New England Medical 
Center in Boston where he 
is still affiliated. 

Dr. Hemady is a 
diplomate of the American 
Board of Allergy and 
Immunology and >he 
American College of 
Allergy. 

He has conducted 
original research and has 
co-authored several 
pubhcations in the field of 
allergy and immunology. 




Dr. ZUHAVR HEMADY 

Currently, he is a clinical 
assistant professor at Tufts 
University and the 
attending allergist at the 
Pediatric Allergy Chnic of 
Tufts New England 
Medical Center. 

Dr. Hemady has been 
serving the South Shore 
community specializing in 
allergic diseases such as 
hayfever, asthma, hives, 
allergy to insect stings, 
allergy to drugs, food 
allergy and diseases of the 
immune system, for 10 
years. 



Scott Hamel Graduates 
Mortuary Science Institute 



Scott Hamel, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Roger Hamel of 
Quincy, recently graduated 
from New England 
Institute of Mortuary 
Science at Mount Ida 

John Sheskey 

Elected To 

Mutual Board 

John Sheskey has been 
elected to Board of 
Directors of the Quincy 
Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 

Sheskey is the principal 
in the architectural firm of 
John • M. Sheskey & 
Associates, Inc. in Quincy. 

He also serves on the 
Board of Directors of the 
South Shore YMCA and is 
a former trustee of the 
Quincy Historical Society. 

Sav« Gas and Monay 
Shop Locally 



College. 

Hamel has also passed 
the National Funeral 
Boards. 

He has been 
apprenticing in his father's 
business, Hamel, Wickens 
& Troupe Funeral Home, 
26 Adams St., Quincy. 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO 



JtRVICi 



MOSIK 



AU10 HOM[ BUSINESS 
. • DEADBOLTSINS.ALIEO 
LOCKS REKETED 
DOOR CLOSERS 
PANIC HARDWARE 
AUTO KEYS FITTED 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM 
756 SO. ARTFRV. QUINCY 

472-2177 




YOU 

AUTO 

KNOW, 

by Tony Centorino, Bill Starkie and Kevin McGroarty 

ALL IN ALIGN 




When most people call 
to mind wheel alignments, 
they think of the conven- 
tional two-wheel alignment 
which concerns itself only 
with the front wheels. How- 
ever, today's vehicles (es- 
pecially those oLrtfitted with 
independent rear suspen- 
sions) call for four-wheel 
alignments. Regardless of 
their position, wheels that 
are out of alignment will 
experience rapid or uneven 
tire wear and/or cause the 
car to pull to one side during 
steering. For proper han- 
dling, traction, and tire life, 
all four wheels should be 
perpendicular to the road 
and run parallel to one an- 
other. To this end, the three 
basic alignment angles of 
toe, camber, and caster may 



be adjusted. On selected 
cars, the caster and cam ber 
are not adjustable. 
HINT: If necessary, make 
four-wheel alignment part 
of new tire purchase or ro- 
tation. 

Call 843-1550, LEO & 
WALT'S SUNOCO for an 
appointment if your car is 
showing signs of any prob- 
lem. Our technicians are 
trained to get you back on 
the road safely by officiently 
and com pletely handling the 
problems that may occur. 
For the best service i n town , 
we're here 258 Quincy 
Ave., E. Braintree (843- 
1550). Remember, we are 
much more than a typical 
"gas" station. "A Place 
Where Your Car Can Live 
Longer. " 



Laurie Hughes Assistant 

Account Executive 
At Devine & Pearson 



Laurie Hughes has been 
named Assistant Account 
Executive at Devine & 
Pearson in Quincy. 

Hughes will assist the 
management of advertising 
and promotion for the 
bottler division of Ocean 
Spray. 

Prior to joining Devine 
& Pearson, she worked as 
an Account Coordinator at 
Grey Advertising in New 
York City. Her accounts 
included Amerada-Hess, 
Emste & Young, Canada 
Dry and Ray-Ban. 

She is originally from 
Larchmont, N.Y., and 
obtained her undergraduate 
degree in marketing from 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiM^^ 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 
THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 
Docket No. 93P1753A1 
Estate of VIRGINIA H. 
BROWN 
late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that EDWARD A. BROWN, 
Jr., of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed administrator of 
said estate without surety 
on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
September 29, 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the nineteenth 
day of July, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/29/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 
Docket No. 92P2874E1 
To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Dorothy Mary Eichorn late 
of Quincy in said County, 
deceased, testate. 

A petition has been 
presented to said Court for 
license to sell-at private 
sale-certain real estate of 
said deceased, -and that 
the petitioner may become 
the purchaser of said real 
estate, which is situated in 
Quincy in the County of 
Norfolk, in accordance 
with the offer set out in 
said petition. 

If you desire to object 
thereto you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon 
on the twenty-sixth day of 
August. 1993, the return 
day of this citation. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First Judge 
of said Court, this twelfth 
day of July, 1 993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register 

7/29/93 




LAURIE HUGHES 

Providence College in 
1991. She now lives in 
Boston. 

LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1548A1 
Estate of JOHN WILLIAM 
BLACK III 
late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that SALLY J. BLACK of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
administratrix of said 
estate without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before ten 
o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 4, 1993. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, the twenty-third 
day of June, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register o< Probate 

7/29/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 
PROBATE AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COURT 
Norfolk, ss. 

No. 93D-0894-D1 

SUMMONS BY 

PUBLICATION 

Paul L. Kenney, Plaintiff 

vs. 

Andrea Kenney, 

Defendant 

To the above named 

Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Paul L. 
Kenney, seeking a Divorce 
on the grounds of cruel 
and Abusive treatment. 

You are required to 
serve upon Paul L. 
Kenney, plaintiff, whose 
address is 353 Sea St., 
Apt. 37, Quincy, MA 
02169 your answer on or 
before October 6. 1993. If 
you fail to do so, the Court 
will proceed to the hearing 
and adjucation of this 
action. You are also 
required to file a copy of 
your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court 
at Dedham. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esq., First Judge of 
said Court at Dedham, July 
1, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 
7/22, 7/29, 8/5/93 



LEGAL NOTICES 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 
THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 
Docket No. 93P1706E1 
Estate of MARIE M. 
PETFTTO 
late of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that VINCENT 
PAUL PETITTO of 
WAKEFIELD in the County 
of MIDDLESEX be 
appointed executor named 
in tfie will without surety on 
the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 25, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this twelfth day 
of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/29/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 78F2376E1 
Estate of AILI J. 

HOURULA 
late of QUINCY 
In the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 
A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that CAROL 
LEE HART of POUND 
RIDGE in the State of New 
York be appointed 
executrix named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on Septemkjer 1, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this nineteenth 
day of July, one thousand 
nine hundred and ninety- 
three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/29/93 

Save Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



LiQALNQTICiS 

■HMiaUMMiMiliiaMMiiilHMHilMMdlillMMii 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1703E1 
Estate of MARIAN L. RICE 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will and 
codicils of said decedent 
be proved and allowed and 
that DAVID B. RICE of 
LINCOLN in the County of 
MIDDLESEX be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 25, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this twelfth day 
of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/29/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 

MASSACHUSETTS 

PROBATE AND 

FAMILY PROBATE COURT 

Norfolk, ss. 

No. 93D-0899-D1 

SUMMONS BY 

PUBLICATION 

Cassandra Hernandez 

Martinez, Plaintiff 

vs. 

Jose Luis Abreu Martinez, 

Defendant 
To the above-named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by 
the Plaintiff, Cassandra 
Hernandez Martinez, 
seeking a divorce. 

You are required to 
serve upon Shenia M. 
Dancy, Esquire, plaintiff, 
plaintiff's attorney, whose 
address is 919 
Washington Street, 
Dorchester, MA. your 
answer on or before 
October 6, 1993. If you 
fail to do so, the Court will 
proceed to the hearing and 
adjucation of this action. 
You are also required to 
file a copy of your answer 
in the office of the Register 
of this Court at Dedham. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esq., First Judge of 
said Court at Dedham. 
July 1, 1993. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 

7/29,8/5. 8/12/93 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra cnoney by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-310f 



^»^»^^^^^^^^^^^^^i 



Page 18 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 29, 1993 



iNVtTAtlON FOR BIDS 



INVITATION TO BID 

The Department of Public Works for the City of Quincy. 

Massachusetts, will receive sealed bids for Palmer 

Street Reconstruction: Phase II, until 10:00 AM local 

time on Friday, August 27, 1993 at the offices of the 

Commissioner of Public Works, 55 Sea Street, Quincy, 

Massachusetts, 02169, at which time and place all bids 

will be publicly opened and read aloud. 

The work under this contract consists of selective cold 

planning and approximately 800 feet of existing 

pavement, installation of new pavement, new sidewalks, 

wheelchair ramps, resetting of curbs, sewer, drainage 

and other utility appurtenances, landscaping, 

improvement of road intersections and curb openings to 

facilitate drainage and to meet the grades at the existing 

street and driveway pavements. 

All work shall be performed in accordance with the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Public 

Works Standard Specifications for Highways and 

Bridges and Construction Standards, as last revised, 

unless specified or directed otherwise. 

All work under this contract shall be completed within 54 

calendar days. 

A non-refundable deposit of $60.00 in cash or check 

payable to the City of Quincy, will be required for each 

set of Contract Documents. 

Bidders requesting Contract Documents by mail shall 

also include an additional non-refundable $15.00, 

cash or check payable to the City of Quincy, to cover the 

costs of shipping and handling. 

The Contract Documents may be obtained during the 

business hours 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM at the Offices of the 

Commissioner of Public Works, Engineering Division, 55 

Sea Street, Quincy, Massachusetts, 02169 on or after 

Thursday, August 12, 1993 

Each bkl shall be accompanied by a bid security in the 

amount of five percent (5%) of the total value of the bid in 

the form described in the Instructions to Bidders. 

The Successful Bidder must furnish a one hundred 

percent (100%) Construction Performance Bond and a 

one hundred percent (100%) Construction Payment 

Bond with a surety company acceptable to the City. 

The Bidding and award of this Contract shall be in full 

compliance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 

30, Section 39M, as last revised. 

All prospective bidders must obtain pre-bid 

qualification from the Massachusetts Department of 

Public Works, Contract Regulations Division, 10 Park 

Plaza, Room 7552, Boston, MA 02116. 

Bidders attention is called to the conditions of 

employment to be complied with and the minimum wage 

rates to be paid under the Contract. 

No bidder may withdraw his bid within 60 days after the 

actual date of the opening of the bids. 

This contract to be awarded as a result of this 

Advertisement for Bids is to be funded by the 

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), 

the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of 

Public Works and the City of Quincy. 

All Federal/State and City of Quincy regulations in 

relation to Minority Business Enterprise, Women 

Business Enterprise, Minority Work Force, Employment 

of Quincy Residents, as required under City Ordinance 

No. 532, and Minimum Wage Rates shall be complied 

with. 

Goals for this project are as follows: 

1 . The Contractor shall maintain on this 
project a not less than eleven percent (11%) ratio of 
minority employees manhours to total manhours in each 
job category. 

2. A minimum of eleven percent (11%) 
Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) participation and 
five percent (5%) Women Business Enterprise (WBE) 
participation by state-certified MBEs and WBEs will be 
required and maintained on this project. The bidder shall 
submit complete MBE/WBE forms with the Bid. 

3. The City of Quincy's Ordinance No. 
532, requiring Contractors working on City-supported 
Construction projects to have one Quincy F^esident out 
of every three workers on the project must be complied 
with. 

4. The Contractor shall pay the higher of 
the two minimum wage rates, as mandated by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Labor 
and Industries and the U.S. Department of Labor Wage 
Rates issued in the most current "Wage Decisions", 
applicable to the area. 

Failure to comply with these requirements may render a 

proposal non-responsive. No waiver of any portion of 

these provisions will be granted. 

The City reserves the right to waive any informality in or 

to reject any or all Bids when such an action is deemed in 

the best interest of the City. Non-responsive and/or 

unbalanced bids may be rejected. 

Richard H. Mead 

Director, Planning Department 

Davki A. Colton 
Commissioner of Public Works 
7/29/93 




BUY U.S. 
SAVINGS BONDS 



LEGAL Notices 

MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AM) 

FAMLY COURT 

NorldKss. 

No.9gW0244P1 

98WCe4&T>1 

SUMWIONS BY PUBLICATION 

Joseph RWhsbw, 

Plainiiff 

VSw 

The Estats and F^srsonal 
Representative Of 

Christine Bleakney and 

to al Persons Interested, 
Defendant 
To the above-named 
Dsfendait: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court by the 
Plaintiff, Joseph R. Winstow, 
seeking Adjudication of 
Paternity and Custody of 
Amber Lee Bleakney and 
Joseph Charles Bleakriey, of 
Quincy in said County, for 
reasons more fully set out in 
saidCompiairTt 

You are required to serve 
upon Joseph R. Winslow, 
plaintiff, wfxBe adc^ess is 100 
Washington St. #19, Quincy, 
MA 021 69 your answer on or 
before August 25, 1 993. If you 
fail to do so, the Court will 
proceed to the hearing and 
ac^ucfication of this action. You 
are also required to file a copy 
of your answer in the office of 
the Register of this Court at 
Decham. 

Witness, ROBERT M. 
FORD. Esq., Frst Judge of said 
Court at Decham. 
DatBd:July12,1993 

mOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate Court 

7/22,7/29,8^5/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

PROBATE AND FAMILY 

COURT DEPARTMENT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 88P3321 El 
Notice of 
Fiduciary's Account 

To all persons 
interested in the estate of 
Marie M. McDonnell, late of 
Quincy, Norfolk County. 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 72 that the first 
and final account(s) of 
John E. Johnson as 
Executor (the fiduciary) of 
said estate have been 
presented to said Court for 
allowance. 

If you desire to 
preserve your right to file 
an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court 
at Dedham on or before the 
eleventh day of August. 
1 993 the return day of t!iis 
citation. You may upon 
written request by 
registered or certified mail 
to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney for the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy 
of said account(s). If you 
desire to object to any item 
of said account(s), you 
must, in addition to filing a 
written appearance as 
aforesaid, file within thirty 
days after said return day 
or within such other time 
as the Court upon motion 
may order a written 
statement of each such 
item together with the 
grounds for each objection 
thereto, a copy to be 
served upon the fiduciary 
pursuant to Mass. R. Civ. 
P. Rule 5. 

WITNESS, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this fifteenth day 

of July, 1993. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/29/93 



COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 
Docket No. 93P1695E1 

Estate of ERNEST F. 

SCHROTH 

AKA: ERNEST F. 

SCHROTH, SR. 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that ERNEST 
F. SCHROTH, Jr., of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK and EDWARD 
J. SCHROTH II of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
be appointed executors 
named in the will without 
surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 25, 
1993. 

In addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this twelfth day 
of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 

7/29/93 

COMMONWEALTH OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 
THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 
FAMILY COURT 
Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 93P1 728E1 

Estate of WILLIAM E. 

HIATT 

AKA: WILLIAM EUGENE 

HIATT 

late of QUINCY 

In the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been 
presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying 
that the last will and codicil 
of said decedent be 
proved and allowed and 
that DAVID L. WILSON of 
READING in the County of 
MIDDLESEX be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object 
to the allowance of said 
petition, you or your 
attorney should file a 
written appearance is sakf 
Court at Dedham on or 
before 10:00 in the 
forenoon on August 25, 
1993. 

in addition you should 
file a written statement of 
objections to the petition, 
giving the specific grounds 
therefore, within thirty (30) 
days after the return day 
(or such other time as the 
Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, 
may allow) in accordance 
with Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. 
Ford, Esquire, First 
Justice of said Court at 
Dedham, this twelfth day 
of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and ninety-three. 

THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/29/93 



Sgt. Richard Pierson 
Receives Army Award 



Staff Sgt. Richard L. 
Pierson, of Quincy, has 
been decorated with the 
Army Achievement Medal 
which is awarded for 
meritorious service, acts of 
courage, or other 
outstanding 
accomplishments. 

Pierson is a motor 



transport operator with the 
U.S. Army Recruiting 
Battalion. 

He is the son of Arlene 
E. and Kenneth M. Pierson 
of 31 Nightingale Ave., 
Quincy. 

Pierson graduated from 
Quincy Votechnical 
School in 1974. 



John Reed Officer 
In Two Service Groups 



John Reed, of Business 
Solutions in Braintree, has 
been elected an officer 
with two local service 
groups. 

Reed will be the 
secretary of the Quincy 



Lions Club and vice 
president of the South 
Shore Unit of the 
American Cancer Society 
for the next year. Last 
year, he was on the Board 
of directors of both groups. 



Legais & Classifieds 



WE'RE BACK! 

Jay Jay's Pool Service 

Inground & above 
ground Installation 

Replacement Liners, Filters, 
Loop Loc Covers 

Pool Closings 
Minor & Major Repairs 
Call the rest, then call THE BEST ! 
our new # 472-2053 7^ 



PUBUC NOTICE 



PUBLIC RELEASE 

The Step One Infant/Toddler Day Care announces its participation in the 
USDA Child Care and Adult Care Food Program. Meals are available to 
participating children at no separate charge without regard to race, 
color, national origin, sex, age or handicap. 

Secretary's Income Eligibility Guidelines for Free & Reduced Price 
Meals - July 1, 1993 -June 30, 1994 





Household Si 


Free Mca 


s 


Reduced Price Meals 

Year Month Week 




le Year Month 


Week 




1 


9061 756 


175 


12895 1075 


248 




2 


12259 1022 


236 


17446 1454 


336 




3 


15457 1289 


298 


21997 1834 


424 




4 


18655 1555 


359 


26548 2213 


511 




5 


21853 1322 


421 


31099 2592 


599 




6 


25051 2088 


482 


35650 2971 


686 




7 


28249 2355 


544 


40201 3351 


774 




8 


31447 2621 


605 


44752 3730 


861 




For each 












add'l household 










member add.. 


+3,198 +267 


+62 


+4551 +380 


+88 




Children who 


are members of Af [X 


assistance units or food stamo 1 




households are automatically eligible to receive free meal benefits' 


1 


[ 


INVITATION FOR BIDS | 



Sealed Proposals for ELECTRICAL SERVICES IN 
THE CITY OF QUINCY will be received at the 
PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, 
55 Sea Street, Quincy, MA 02169 until 10:00 
A.M. prevailing time on August 11, 1993 at which 
time they will be publicly opened and read. 
The Contract to whom the Contract may be rewarded will 
be required to appear at this office with the surety 
offered by him and execute the Contract within ten days 
from the date of the mailing of the notice from the 
Commissioner to the bidder, according to the address 
given by him that the Contract is ready for signature and 
in case of his failure or neglect to do so, the 
Commissioner may, at this option, determine that the 
bidder had abandoned the Contract and thereupon the 
certified check or bid bond shall become the property of 
the City of Quincy. 

The Contractor will be required to provide both a 
performance bond and payment/labor and materials bond 
for each for the full Contract Price. A certified check or 
bid bond in the amount of 5% of the base bid shall 
accompany each bid. 

Specifications may be obtained at the Public Works 
Administrative Office upon a non-refundable deposit of 
Twenty Five Dollars ($25.00) for each set. Bidders 
requesting specifications mailed to them shall add a 
separate check for Ten Dollars ($10.00) payable to the 
City of Quincy to cover the mailing and handling. 
The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to accept 
the bid deemed best for the City. 
James A. Sheets 
Mayor 



7/29/93 



David A. Colton 
Commissioner of Public Works 



Thursday, July 29, 1993 Quincy Sua Page 19 



J 




FOR RENT 



EVEKTBODY'S MARKETIHACE 



SERV|OE$ 



•^ wmn t I t w 



HALLS FOR RENT 

Newly Renovated 
Son* of Italy Social Canter 
Golden Lion Suite 
Capacity • 300 
Venetian Room 
Capacity - 140 
Call 47^SM0 



TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C 

Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information pleeise call 

767-0519 



TF ■ 



HALL FOR H!RE 

Weddings. Showers, 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Ouinfy 

472-2223 

Tf 



HALL FOR RENT 

Nickerson Post No. 382 

American Legion, Squantum, MA 

Handicapped Accesable. 

Capacity 90 or less. 

Call 328-9824 
Monday through Saturday 4-7 pm tf 



SER ViCgS 

^,fiaat8iaiiiiiiiiiii i i i'i ii' iuut4umi". 



SiRViCES 



2 HALLS FOR RENT 

1 suitable for large functions 
(350-1- people); otiier suited for 
smaller functions (120 people). 
Call tlie George F. Bryan Post 

472-6234 9/2 



COTTAGES 
FOR RENT 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, house- 
keeping cottages. Stu- 
dio and 3 room avail- 
able. Weekly rentals 
$200-$350. Private 
beach. Tennis avail- 
able. Call 328-1300, 9 
am to 6 pm 



TF 



^^^^^^^^^ 



WANTED 



HAND TOOLS 
WANTED 

Wood or steel planes. Also, 
chisels, clamps, tool chests, old 
hand tools, all trades (machinist, 
pattern maker, watchmaker, etc.) 
shop lots. Also, antiquarian 
books, frames, paintings , crocks, 
lanterns. Antiques in estate lots. 
1-617-558-3839 tf 



msrmL 



SIESTA SLEEP SHOP 

Mattress Chain Outlet -40% 
Savings. Stoughton Center 
next to Town Hail & Post 
Office-Rtes 138/27 

617-344-4888 7/» 



oppoirruNiTY 



BAHAMA CRUISE 

5 Days/4 nights, 
Underbookedl Must Sell! 

Limited tickets. $299 per 
couple. 407-331-7818 EXT 
4625 MON SAT 9 AM 9 PM 

8/19 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telf Jhone: 
471-3100 



PRECISION 

^ LAMP 

^\*^- REfiMR& 

REWIRING 




ta 



SSGRmk 



nwTn 

v.o«ia KoaHa mamtmi 



iiiWSQiiAt 



PRAYER TO THE 
BLESSED VIRGIN 

(Never Known to Fail) 
Oh most l>eautiful flower of 
Mt. Carmel, Fruitful vine, 
splendor of Heaven, Blessed 
Mother of the Son of God, Im- 
maculate Virgin, Assist me in 
my necessity. Oh Star of the 
Sea, help me and show me 
herein you are my mother. Oh, 
Holy Mary, Mother of God, 
Queen of Heaven and Earth! I 
humbly beseech you from the 
bottom of my heart to succor 
me in this necessity. There are 
none that can withstand your 
power. Oh, show me herein you 
are my mother. Oh Mary con- 
ceived without sin, pray for us 
who have recourse to thee (3x) 
Holy Mother, I place this cause 
in your hands (3x) Holy Spirit, 
you who solve all problems, 
light roads so that I can attain 
my goal. You who gave me 
divine gift to forgive and forget 
all evil against me and that in all 
instances in my life you are 
with me. I want in this short 
prayer to thank you for all things 
as you confirm once again that 
I never want to l>e separated 
from you in etemal glory. Thank 
you for your mercy toward me 
and mine. The person must say 
this prayer 3 consecutive days. 
After 3 days the request will be 
granted. This prayer must be 
published after the favor is 
granted. r.h. 7/29 

THANKSGIVING NOVENA 
TO ST. JUDE: 

O Holy St. Jude, Apostle and 
Martyr, great in virtue and rich 
in mirades, near kinsman of 
Jesus Christ, faitfiful interces- 
sor of all who invoke your spe- 
cial patronage in time of need, 
to you I have recourse from 
the depths of my heart and 
humbly beq to wfiom God has 
given sucn great power, to 
come to my assistance, fielp 
me in my present and urgent 
petition. In return, I promise to 
make your name known and 
cause you to l>e invoked. Say 
3 Our Fathers, 3 Hail Marys 
and Glories. Publk^ation must 
be promised. St. Jude pray for 
us and all who invoke your aid. 
Amen. This Novena has never 
been known to fail. I have had 
my request granted. (This No- 
vena to be said on 9 consecu- 
tive days RH.7/29 

PRAYER TO 
THE HOLY SPIRrr 

Holy Spirit, you who gives mean- 
ing to and shines light on my path 
so that I may reach my goals, you 
who gives me the divine grace to 
forgive and forget the evil done 
unto me and which is with me at 
every moment of my life. I want in 
this short dialogue to reassure 
you one more time that I do not 
ever want to be separated from 
you, no matter how grand the 
worldly possessions may be, my 
desire to be with you and my 
brothers in perpetual glory will not 
be lessened. (Oneshou Id sayth is 
prayer 3 days in a row without 
mentioning the request, within 3 
days the divine favor shall be 
granted, no matter how unobtain- 
able it seemed) Publish this prayer 
as soon as yourrequest isgranted. 

RH. 7/29 




EXPERt 

lAMP nnw 

A REWNHNG 



M^wMMMMUUMUMMMMMn 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

472-2177 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



FRQFESSQNAL 

REBMR 
WNDCMS 
&SCREE1S5 



$EBVlCi$ [ 

" 1 i ■f \ -r I i T i ^Wr i iT i " ! Tj iiii tt i . ii . i M I ' li ' 




ACi 



NMRKHPRE 



ni-nn 

V.QIMCT N.< 



LARRY'S 
HOME REPAIR 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • lnsur»d 
Interior - Exterior Painting 
Scroll Celling 
All Home Repairs 
Small or Lxirge 
1-800-479-2476 tf 



O'HARTE MASONRY 

Complete Masonry 

Service Lie. & Ins. 

Phone Ted 

at 773-8622 

after 7 p.m. 7/m 



ATTENTION 

Local cablnetnmker needs wortd I 
will resurface your kitchen (with 
laminate of your choice), for less 
than half the cost of new cabinets. 

QUALITY CRAFTMANSHIP 
/ e/eo reeror* mnVqu* ktmltuiw. 

W.F. ALLEN 
CABINETMAKER 

Over 30 yrs. experience 
(617)328-9048 

Leave Message a/s 



J.D. PAINTING 

Quality work, 

reasonatily priced. 

All work guaranteed. 

FREE estimates 

773-4541 9/23 

CONSTRUCTION 

Roofing, painting, carpen- 
try, porch work, windows, 
door,gutters. Small jobsand 
vinyl siding. FREE esti- 
mates. T. Sweeney 
825-1210 Reliable 9/30 



A&T VACUUM 

•IS.95 Overhaul Special on 
any vacuum 

• S«w^ machine repairmg 

• VCR repairing and cleaning 
•Sharpening 

(scissors, knives, etc.) 
•Greek XL Vacums $249 

• Electrofcix w/power nozzle 

$190. 

• Used vacuums $45 & up 

27BealeSt.,Wollaston 
479-6066 TF 



Wf*^<^gWWI 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 II i | 



mmIm* 



SULLIVAN TREE SERVICE 

Pruning, removals, 

cableing, fertilizing, 

brush chipping. 

Fully Insured FREE est. 

Mike 472-3595 vs 



AARONS GLASS 

Lowest prices guaranteed. 
Plate and safety glass, 
screens, custom mirrors 
ail shapes and colors, 
tabletops. 773-3290 mo 



VIKING 
ROOFING 

Residential 
Specialists 

773-2884 



9/9 



Your South Shore ' 

Headquartere 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin SI . So Ouincy 

4/2-1710 

TF. 




YARD WORK CO. 

• Reliable Lawn 

Mowing Service 

• Expert Bush & 
Hedge Trimming 

• Yard Cleanup 

• Fertilize Lawn 

• Other Work-Ask 

Experienced 
FREE Estimate 



Call Bill Fielding 
471-6124 



8/26 



R. Papkey Painting 

Commercial & Residential 

Free Estimates 
Call Bob 
773-1531 10/14 



SMALL STUFFI! 

»20 A 14). a»«nlng, r«movid, ^ass cut 
trimirtng, bfu«h r»mov»d, tranches dug tor 
•l*»)c«l wiring, gravd (Hpw. painiinQ 
ptekHjps. datvwtn. Also ask abou $1 o.OO 
rtmovaldML 

Call John Boy Services 



7/29 



liiiiHi! 



CHPPiMTUNmr 



iiMIIIMMIIiet! 




PROB\NE" 



Janl-Clean Co. 

Insured - Certified Professional 

Carpet - Window Cleaners 

1 0% off Carpet Cleaning 

Free Fatxic Protector with any 

2 upholstery items cleaned 
(617)341-3852 e/i2 



Savt Qm and Moiwy 
Shop Locally 



^Ci 



a)LB.TANK 

E)CHANGE 

$7.99 

WEST ouHcr our 

flfB8L«> 



BINGO 



Knights of Columbus 

5 Mollis Ave 

Earlybird 7 PM, every 

Wednesday 

2 Winners take all 

Lucky 7s-Bonus 

FREE Coffee-Snacks 9«3 



MODELS 

2 YEARS OLD THRU ADULT. SEEKING NEW 
FACES FOR PROMOTION TO LOCAL AD- 
VERTISERS/COMMERCIAL PRODUCERS 
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY. DETAILS & 
SELECTIONS AT 5 OR 7PM SHARP ON 
THURSDAY, JULY 29th ATSHERATONTARA- 
BRAINTREE, MA. 1-93 Exit 6. MINORS MUST 
BE WITH LEGAL GUARDIAN. 
HIGHLITE MODELING (717) 346-3166 7/29 




(F MASSACHUSETTS BAy 




MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN. 1372 Hancock St., Ouincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment mutt accompany order. 



INDEX 



a ScnHcee 

D For Sale 

O Autos 

a Boats 

a For Rent 

D Wanted 

Help Wanted 

a Pets, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

'3 Real Estate Wanted 

O Miscellaneous 

O Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

O Coins A Slamos 

D Rett Homes 

D Instruction 

O Day Care 

a Personal 

O Electrical & Appliances 



RATES 
IWEEK 
S-7 WEEKS 

S-12 WEEKS 

IS WEEKS 
Oil MORE 



D $5.00foron6lnaertlon.upto20word«.10«fore«:haddltlonalword. 

D $4.80 per Inaertlon up to 20 words for 3-7 inaertlons of the same ad, 

10< each addittonal word, 
a $4.30 per Inaertlon up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions of thesamead. 

10< more each additional word. 
D $4.00 per Insertion up to 20 words fori 3 or mora insertions of the 

same ad, 10< each additional word. 



D Enclosed is $ — 
In The Quincy Sun 



.for the following ad to run 



.weeks 



COPY: 



NO RBFUNO WMJ. M MAOl AT THIS CONTRACT RAW IN TMB eVSMT OF CANCtLLATIOM. 
OCAOUNC: MONDAY. SM PM. PLCASt INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMKR IN AD. 



r 



Page 20 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 29, 1993 




ASHBY'S 

895 Quincy Shore Drive 

Wollaston Beach 

Open Year Round 

Roast Beef, Seofood, B.B.Q. Ribs 

Now sending weekend breakfast 7:30 - 

FREE I 

Buy one ckam plate and | 

receive the 2nd clam pfat© | 

at 1/2 price I 




J 7:30 



Adopt A City 
Park Or Playground 



FREE 

Small cup of coffee 
w/ purchase of breakfast 

OINir void wRh coupon 
I oiMr vdlld WBh coupon uqiiw* b- to-y» . 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

Residents interested in 
helping to improve the 
city's 41 parks and 
playgrounds will now have 
their chance to do so. 

The City Council 
Monday night passed a 
resolution calling for civic 
organizations such as 
Quincy Youth Soccer and 
Quincy Youth Baseball, as 
well as other community 
groups, to work with the 



Domcuh MSiUizZiillii, MO 



We have 
moved, but 
our focus 
hasn't 
changed! 



Currently acccptmg new patients. 



Dr. Donicnic Slrazzulla and 
his siafl arc pleased to 
announce the relocation of 
their ophthalmic offices. We're 
in the same building, on the 
same door — our oflices have 
just moved around the corner! 
Our address and phone 
number remain the same. 

This move will allow us to 
better serve our patients with 
state-of-the-art, quality eye 
care in a more spacious and 
comfortable environment. 



I^omenic M. Strazzulia, Mf^ 
Crown Colony edifice F'ark 
500 Congress Street 
Suite lA-1 
Quincy, MA 02 169 
(617)770-1505 



Providing state-of-the-art 
eye care, now and into the 
future: 

■ cataract surgery 

■ lens implants 

• in-offtce laser surgery 

Ji treatment for glaucoma and 

diabetic eye disease 
Dr. StrazzuUa i<, a hoard lertified 



HAVE YOUR PAYROLL, 

SOCIAL SECURITY, 

PENSION, OR ANY 

GOVERNMENT CHECK 

MAILED TO US FOR... 




South Boston Savings Bank Direct 
Deposit allows you to have your 
payroll, social security, pension or any 
government check mailed directly to the 
bank. Some of the advantages of direct 
deposit are... you can protect against 
mailbox theft. ..you can save time... 
eliminate trips to the bank, and your 
money is available when you need it. 



SoutI) Boston 
Savings Bank 

■^ 'ALWAYS THE LEADER" -- 



Have It deposited in a NOW checl<ing 
account that pays interest*, regular 
savings or money market account 

• No monthly service charge and 
no charge for basic checks for 
Direct Deposit customers 

and 18/65 customers. 

• No monthly service charge 

for $750 minimum balance. 
Under $750 balance--$3.00 per 
month + .25c per check, 

SIO minimum daily balance required on all accounts 
to earn interest 



IVIEIVIBER FDIC/DIF 



MAIN OFFICE 

460 West Broadway 
South Boston 
"268-2500 



NEPONSET CIRCLE 

740 Gallivan Blvd 
825-9090 



QUINCY 

690 Adams St 
Lakin Square 
479-9660 



NORTH QUINCY 

440 Hancock St 
733-8100 



WEYMOUTH 

544 Mam St 
377-1050 



NEEDHAM 

355 Chestnut St 
449^210 



WEST ROXBURY 

1833 Centre St 
323-8000 



council in aiding the city's 
Park Department in 
making the parks and 
playgrounds "the very best 
they can be." 

As part of the 
resolution, each of these 
groups would be able to 
adopt a park or playground 
in a manner similar to the 
city's Adopt-An-Island 
program. 

Councillor Michael 
Cheney, who introduced 
the resolution, said a 
recent front-page story in 
The Patriot Ledger 
criticizing many of the 
city's parks did not take 
into consideration all of 
the facts regarding the 
state of the parks. Cheney 
noted that Park Director 
Raymond Cattaneo only 
has eight workers at his 
disposal, as opposed to the 
Quincy Park Department 
of 20 years ago which 
employed 38 workers. 

"I'd like to praise Ray 
Cattaneo for his gallant 
efforts without adequate 
resources," said Cheney. 

Cheney added that the 
Ledger article failed to 
note that some of the 
city's parks are under the 
School Department's 
control, not the Park 
Department's. 

Several councillors, 



including Ward 2 
Councillor Ted 

DeCristofaro, noted that 
the Ledger article may 
have been a little unfair in 
its appraisal of the parks. 

"What that paper did is 
unbelievable," said 
DeCristofaro. "Those guys 
who work at the (park) 
department do a 
tremendous job." 

"We wouldn't have 
accomplished Collins- 
Rest-A- While without the 
Park Department 

employees," agreed 
Council President Charles 
Phelan, referring to the 
recently renovated 
playground on Southern 
Artery. 

Councillors agreed, 
however, that the city's 
parks and playgrounds 
have not been a high 
priority in recent years. 

"I'm taking it as a 
challenge," said 

Councillor Timothy Cahill. 
"We'll never have all 41 
parks looking perfect; it 
would be impossible. But 
we have not done enough." 

DeCristofaro added that 
the program also needs 
"public input," and called 
upon residents to pick up 
trash and other waste at 
the parks and playgrounds 
while visiting them. 



For a relaxing summer, slip on 
something cool & comfortable. 

While you relax in Summer's warmth, keep your feet cool in 
a pair of sandals from Trotters.* They're made with the finest 
leathers and padded for ail-day comfoit. 

Sale $19.90 

Other styles also available at similar savings 




TROTTERS 




HANI ON S 



27B COTTAGE AVE., QUINCY 
Mon thru Wed. Fri & Sat until 6pm Thurs until 9pm 



^^^ 645 HA^ 



MANTIS 



645 HANCOCK ST. PHONE 32a-6879 
WOLLASTON. MA 021 70 



Summer color can make the garden come alive. 

A variety of plants can be added to your garden to 
provide that splash of color that will bring the garden 
back to life. 
Shrubs 

1. Buddleia - butterfly bush, purple, pink, white 

2. Hydrangea - whites, pinks, blues 

3. Potentilla - yeUows, whites and reds 
Vines 

1. Hydrangea 

2. Honeysuckle 

3. Qematis 
Perennials 

1. Coneflowers 

2. Globe thistle 

3. Loosestrife 

4. Liatris 

5. Speedwell 

6. Joe Pye weed 

7. Veronica 

Continue to water well and fertilize monthly throughout 
the summer. Also remember to remove dead flowers to 
encourage new budding. 



( Enjoy Jhe view from ^ pool. 




Quincy B 
Special Sec 




VOL. 25 No. 46 




Thursday, August 5, 1993 



Asks Sheets' Support 

Chretien Proposes 

Electric, Natural 

Gas For City Cars 

By ROBERT BOSWORTH 

Ward 3 Councillor Larry Chretien is appealing to Mayor James Sheets for his 
support and cooperation in the promotion of the use of alternatively fueled vehicles 
in Quincy. 



"This would be a 
natural extension of your 
commitment towards 
making the city 'Cleaner 
and Greener,'" Chretien 
stated in a letter to Sheets 
last week. 

Chretien, a leader in 
the city's recycling 
movement, said the new 
federal Clean Air Act has 
several provisions 
regarding the use of AFVs, 
particularly those powered 
by electricity and natural 
gas. "Although it may 
take some years before 
passenger cars run on 
alternative fuels, many 
public and private fleet 
operators are moving in 
this direction," the 
councillor said. 

Chretien pointed out 
Quincy is the home of the 
only natural gas powered 
garbage truck in America, 
operated by BFI. 
"Working with the private 



sector, there is much more 
that can be done in this 
city to make it cleaner, 
greener and less dependent 
on foreign oil," he said. 

Chretien said the city 
could start moving toward 
AFVs by purchasing new 
natural gas or electric 
vehicles for various city 
departments. "Existing 
vehicles could be 
converted on a case-by- 
case basis, depending on 
feasibihty. On a parallel 
track, we would encourage 
other pubhc and private 
fleet operators to do the 
same," Chretien wrote, 
noting the MBTA, taxis, 
Postal Service and trolley 
service as possible 
operators. 

On Tuesday, Sheets 
said he will examine 
Chretien's suggestion. 
"We'll look at it. It 
depends on cost and 
efficiency. We'll take a 



look at his 

recommendation." 

The mayor said a 
change to AFVs would 
have to be practical and 
cost-effective. "I need 
patrol cars that can 
accelerate quickly. We 
still have a budget and we 
must adhere to that," he 
said. 

Chretien has suggested 
the city organize a 
working group to 
determine a plan of action. 
In the beginning, he said 
the group should include 
the state Division of 
Energy Resources, Boston 
Gas and Public Works 
Commissioner David 
Colton. 

"As things develop, we 
can bring in other parties," 
Chretien said. 

The councillor said the 
AFV technology exists and 
that other cities and towns 

(Cont'd On Page 3) 



Police Urge Residents 

To Take Precautions 

After Two Seniors Attacked 



Residents are being 
urged by the Quincy 
PoUce Department to take 
precautions while out 
alone at night following 
the beatings and robberies 
of two senior citizens last 
week. 

Both men were beaten 
so badly with a chain that 
they have litUe memory of 
the attacks. 

The first attack 
occurred last Friday about 
12:45 a.m., according to 
Detective Lt. Neil 
MacDonald. John Coghlan, 
72, was walking home 
from the Wollaston MBTA 
station after returning from 
a part-time job in Boston 
when he was jumped and 
beaten at the intersection 
of Clay and Chapman Sts. 

A neighbor who heard 
the attack found Coghlan 



lying on a sidewalk, saw a 
man running from the 
scene to a waiting car, and 
gave a description of the 
man to police, according 
to MacDonald. 

Edward Martin, 21, of 
Quincy was arrested and 
charged with the crime. 
MacDonald said Martin 
told police he once lived 
in South Boston and now 
stays with friends in 
Quincy. 

Martin pleaded 
innocent Monday in 
Quincy District Court on 
charges of armed assault 
with intent to rob or 
murder, assault with intent 
to murder, armed robbery 
of a person over 65 years 
old, assault and battery 
with a dangerous weapon, 
and assault and battery. He 
was held on $100,000 bail. 



MacDonald said 
because of information 
from Boston Police, 
Quincy Police suspect two 
other men also 
participated in the anack. 

Approximately 45 
minutes after the assault 
on Coghlan, Boston PoUce 
stopped a car matching a 
description given by the 
neighbor who heard the 
attack. Police said three 
young men, including 
Martin, were in the car. 
The driver was charged 
with speeding, then 
allowed to go. 

A second Quincy man 
was attacked the same 
morning at about 4:45 
a.m., MacDonald said. The 
70-year-old was jogging 
along Adams St. toward 
Newport Ave. when a daik- 

(Cont'd On Page 24) 



HI 




\ 


i 




^ 

yni 


B 


I^ 








f 




^H 


I^^^^^^^^^K' ^\^MB 






'^ 


* 




^^^^^^^^^1 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^™ 


H 


^^m^. 


W- 


Ml 


J 


mi 





THOMAS BOYNTON ADAMS (foreground), a direct descendant of John Adams, leads 
ofHcials on a tour of the Adams National Historic Site. Joining him are, from left, 
Congressman Gerry Studds, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and Mayor James Sheets. 

{Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Sends Out Mailing Appeal 

Sheets Seeking 
Home-grown Tourists 



As part of the city's 
continuing effort to boost 
tourism. Mayor James 
Sheets is conducting a 
mass mailing to invite 
local residents and their 
guests to visit Quincy's 
historical landmarks. 

Sheets said Quincy 
residents are an untapped 
resource in the city's 
tourim effort. He said he 
hopes the mailing will 
help spark an interest 
among those residents who 
have not visited their 



hometown's historic sites. 

"This (Quincy) is a 
historical treasure. We 
know it's here but it's 
never been accentuated. It 
would be nice for people 
who have visitors outside 
of the city to have them 
visit the sites and go on 
the trolley," Sheets said. 

The mayor's mailing 
consists of a letter from 
Sheets which informs 
residents of several new 
tourism ventures, including 
the National Park Service 



visitors' center in Quincy 
Center; the trolley transit 
service which links the 
Adams National Historic 
Sites (Adams Mansion, 
Birthplaces and United 
First Parish Church); and 
the "Walk of Names" 
brick plaza project 
planned for the entrance of 
the City Hall annex. 

The mailing also 
included a flyer for the 
"Walk of Names" project 
and a brochure featuring 

(Cont'd On Page 2) 




TROLLEY IS ALIGHTED by Cong. Gerry Studds (white shirt) and Mayor James 
Sheets as they and Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt are greeted by U.S. Park Service 
rangers during their visit to the Adams National Historic Site. The visit foUowed a tour 
of Boston Harbor Islands which local officials hope wUI become part of the National Park 
Service. The trolley transports tourists to Quincy's various historic landmarks. The 
troUey is manned by the Park Service which operates a visitors' center in Presidents 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 



Page 2 Quincy Sua Thursday, August 5, 1993 



Tours Area With Interior Secretary Babbitt 

Studds Wants Boston 

Harbor Islands Linked 

To Quincy Historic Sites 



By WAYNE FITZPATRICK 

Secretary of the Interior 
Bruce Babbitt and 
Congressman Gerry Studds 
toured Quincy Saturday 
and discussed a study 
which will decide whether 
the Boston Harbor Islands 
should be linked with 
Quincy's historic sites. 

If such a linkage is 
viable, Studds would like 
Quincy and the Boston 
Harbor Isl ands 

incorporated into a much 
broader National Coastal 
Maritime Heritage Trail. 
The congressman would 
like to group well-known 
historic, cultural and 
recreational sites along the 
Eastern seaboard from 
Maine to Florida into one 
trail. 

Studds pitched his 
proposal to Babbitt during 
the secretary's visit to 
Quincy Saturday. The 
congressman's idea was 
also discussed by local 
officials, including Mayor 
James Sheets. 

According to Studds, 
the Boston Harbor Islands 
study will cost $250,000 
and has been approved by 
the federal government. 
The year-long study, which 
will begin next week, will 
determine whether the 30 
harbor islands should be 
incorporated into a 
national paric system. 

If the study determines 
that the islands and 
Quincy's historic sites 
should be linked and thus 
fall under the auspices of 
the National Park Service, 
then officials would work 
to connect the islands and 
sites with rail and boat 
transit as well as by 
trolley, said Bernice 
Mader, administrative 
assistant to Mayor James 
Sheets. 

Mader said Quincy and 
the Boston Harbor islands 
are already linked in 
history. She noted John 
Adams courted his wife, 
Abigail, on Ransford 
Island in Boston Harbor. 
Adams also named Foit 
Independence on Castle 
Island while he was 
president. 

If the islands become 
part of the park service, 
the next logical step 
officials say would be to 
establish Studds' proposed 
National Coastal Maritime 
Heritage Trail. Studds 
said the trail would 
include sites related to 
maritime history, industry, 
commerce, culture, and 
the natural coastal 
environment. 

Potential sites would 
include lighthouses, 
maritime museums, fishing 
villages, national parks 
and wildlife refuges, and 
historic shipwrecks. States 
would participate 
voluntanly, but, if they 
chose to participate , they 
would be required to 
match the federal grant 



dollar for dollar with a 
dedicated source of non- 
federal monies, and 
establish a non-profit Trail 
Advisory Committee to 
administer the state's trail, 
the congressman said. 

Babbitt said a decision 
on whether to make the 
Harbor Islands part of the 
park service would be 
made by 1996. He also 
said he supports the 
creation of a National 
Coastal and Maritime 
Heritage Trail. 

After arriving at Marina 
Bay on the "Gracious 
Lady", Babbitt, Studds, 
and their guests boarded a 
trolley which travelled 
past WoUaston Beach and 
journeyed into Quincy 
Center encompassing the 
WoUaston Cemetery, and 
the United First Parish 
Church. The trolley 
stopped at the Adams 
Mansion where Babbitt 
and Studds were given a 
tour. 

After their tour, Sheets, 
Babbitt, and Studds joined 
their visitors at the 
Carriage House for lunch 
served by Encore Catering 
of Quincy, courtesy of 
Sheets. 

Studds, who introduced 
Babbitt, described the 
1988 Democratic 

presidential candidate and 
former Arizona governor as 
a scholar because of his 
extensive knowledge of 
Western history and New 
England. 

Babbitt commemorated 
the ancestors of the Adams 
family who were "never 
quite content with the 
status quo and were 
always kind of dreaming 
about what the future 
ought to look like." 
Specifically, he 

remembered how John 
Quincy Adams ran for 
Congress after becoming 
president and died on the 
floor of Congress during 
his fight to abolish slavery. 
Babbitt, who was active 
during the Civil Rights 
movement of the 1960s, 
urged the guests to "dream 
a little bit", about "how we 
can put our history 
together, how we can 
integrate our culture, 
restore extraordinary 
maritime environment and 
lay it all into a large 
dream of what the future is 
about." 

Congressman Studds 
described the Boston 
Harbor Islands as a 
"national treasure". 

"It is abundantly clear 
to me that it has ever been 
that for all the reasons we 
all know, for reasons of 
history, natural beauty, 
proximity to three million 
people that is indeed the 
best kept secret," Studds 
said. "I don't know if it is 
entirely good news, but it 
isn't going to be secret 



much longer." 

Studds applauded 
Sheets for his participation 
in Quincy's history. "I 
don't believe I have ever 
met anyone with a more 
passionate feel for, interest 
in, concern about, and 
dedication in preserving 
the best of historical 
heritage." 

Sheets said steps must 
be taken to preserve and 
promote the city's history 
which played a prominent 
role in this nation's 
infancy. 

"We have assembled 
here indeed a group of 
people who are dedicated 
and committed not only to 
writing its page in history, 
but to ensuring that all 
Americans, all of 
America, come to realize, 
to enjoy, and to benefit 
from America's historical 
roots which have taken 
ground in this most 
marvelous city". 

The mayor informed the 
guests of a study recently 
completed which found 
Quincy Center to be an 
"excellent site" for a hotel. 

Sheets attributed the 
success of the historic 
Quincy trail to a 
"partnership that is 
developing this city on an 
economic basis, a 
partnership between the 
National Park Service, the 
city of Quincy, and the 
United First Parish Church 
which has resulted in the 
opening of the United First 
Parish Church seven days 
a week, this summer." 

"We have come 
together to promote our 
rich heritage, but there is 
another dimension of the 
partnership concept. It's a 
partnership between the 
local government, the city 
of Quincy, the National 
Park Service, and the 
United States Congress, 
including the House and 
the Senate", said Sheets. 

"I'm sure that those who 
have gone before all the 
members of the Adams 
family, John Hancock and 
all those, are smiling down 
at us in recognition of 
what we have begun to do 
to ensure that they have 
their place in history and 
that people can come ,aiid 
visit, and enjoy," the 
mayor added. 

Sheets presented 
Babbitt with a Sebastian 
miniature of the Adams 
Academy, a t-shirt from 
his recent visit to aid the 
flood victims in Quincy, 
ni. which read, "The Great 
Flood, the Summer of 
1993", and a bumper 
sticker which read, "I 
fought the River in the 
Great Flood of 1993." 
Sheets also presented 
Studds with a similar t- 
shirt and bumper sticker. 




ADAMS LIBRARY was a point of interest visited by Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, 
center, during his tour of tlie Adams Mansion. Supt. Marianne Peak shows the 
secretary one of the books once read by John Adams. Looking on are Thomas Boynton 
Adams, a direct descendant of John Adams; Congressman Gerry Studds and Mayor 
James Sheets. 

(Quincy Sun pholo by Tom Gorman) 




ADAMS MANSION was toured by Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt (center) ;is he and 
Thomas Boynton Adams, a direct descendant of John Adams, lead entourage of officials. 
In the rear, from left, Supt. Marianne Peak of the MS. Park Service which manages the 
historic site; Cong. Gerry Studds and Mayor James Sheets. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Sheets Seeking 
Home-grown Tourists 



(Cont'd From Page 1 ) 

Quincy's historic sites. 

"It's (the maihng) kind 
of an update to let the 
residents know what's 
happening," the mayor 
said. 

Approximately 17,000 
homes in Quincy will 
receive the mailing which 
started last Thursday, 
Sheets said. The mailing 
will cost $2,800, about 
half of which will be paid 
by Sheets and the other 
through private donations. 

The mayor said no city 
money was used for the 
mailing. 

Marianne Peak, 



superintendent of the 
Adams Nauonal Historic 
Site, said the mailing will 
help promote Quincy's 
tourism. "He (Sheets) is 
acknowledging our 
resources and reminding 
our residents that he have 
new programs and many 
tourist sites in addition to 
the Adams family legacy. 

"I think it's a wonderful 
opportunity for people to 
stop by." 

Since the tourism 
season began in April, 
approximately 20,000 
people have visited the 
Adams National Historic 



Site, Peak said. 
Compared to last year. 
Peak said tourism is up 
about 50 percent. 

Of those visitors. Peak 
did not know how many 
were from Quincy. 
However, she said there is 
local interest in Quincy's 
history. 

"On the first day of the 
trolley service, a mother 
from Quincy and her two 
daughters were the first to 
arrive," Peak said. 
"Quincy is interested. We 
are being promoted and 
there is very strong 
community interest." 
By ROBERT BOSWORTH 



Red Cross Offering Instructor's Course 



The American Red 
Cross South Area office, 
85 Quincy Ave., is offering 
an instructor's course 
entitled, "Community First 
Aid and Safety" beginning 
Monday, Sept. 13. 

Other course dates are 
Wednesday, Sept. 15, 
Monday, Sept. 20, 
Wednesday, Sept. 20; 
Wednesday, Sept. 22 and 
Monday, Sept. 27. All 
classes are from 6 to 10 
pjn. 

The Red Cross urges all 
people will a background 
in CPR and First Aid to 



consider taking the course. 
"There is no more precious 
gift to give to your fellow 
man or woman than the art 
of saving lives and or 
administering lifesaving 
first aid techniques," said 
Helen Crowley of the Red 
Cross. 

"Nor is anything more 
rewarding or satisfying on 
a personal level than 
joining the elite group of 
American Red Cross 
volunteer instructors. 
Learn to train good 
ordinary folk the ability to 



save a fellow human 
being's life. 

"Accidents happen 
where we least expect 
them, whether it be on the 
job, in the classroom, at 
home with children or 
older loved ones and of 
course, there is an ever 
present chance someone 
will require a simple 
lifesaving technique when 
we are off somewhere 
spending leisure time," 
Crowley said. 

For more information, 
call 770-2600. 



Thursday, August 5, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 3 



Quincy Hospital To Aid 
Hospital In Quincy, Illinois 



Quincy Hospital will be 
collecting cash donations 
to help its sister hospital in 
Quincy, Illinois. 

Blessings Hospital is a 
not-for-profit community 
hospital, serving people 
living on both sides of the 
Mississippi River. It is a 
hospital very similar to 
Quincy Hospital, with 
about the same number of 
beds and providing a wide 
range of community health 
services. 

Ellen Zane, CEO of 
Quincy Hospital, spoke 
with administrators at 
Blessings last week. They 
told her that everyone 
there is working to their 
maximum ability. Since 
the roads are underwater, 
and travel is virtually 
impossible, nurses are 
working shifts of three to 
four days at a time and 
then being transported 



home by a private 
helicopter service. 
Physicians, for the most 
part, are virtually living at 
the hospital. 

Although there seem to 
be sufficient supplies on 
hand, hospital personnel 
are extremely concerned 
about the development of 

massive public health 
problems as the flood 
waters subside. They are 
especially concerned that 
the excessive rain and 
high water level will breed 
an unusually large number 
of mosquitos, creating a 
major health problem. 

Rick Smith, vice 
president for customer 
relations at Blessings, said 
the best way Quincy 
Hospital could help would 
be to collect financial 
donations to be used to 
support the mosquito 
spraying program and help 



deal with other public 
health problems which 
develop as the water 
begins to recede. 

Collection jars for cash 
donations have been 
placed in several locations 
around Quincy Hospital. In 
addition the Dunkin' 
Donuts in the hospital will 
be donating 5 percent of 
all coffee sales this week 
to the relief effort. 

Checks, made out to 
the Adams County Medical 
Society can be sent to Rev. 
Ann Rearick, Director of 
Pastoral Care, Quincy 
Hospital, 114 Whitwell 
St., Quincy, Massachusetts 
02169 to be forwarded to 
Blessings Hospital. 

Donations will be 
accepted through Friday, 
Aug. 5. 

For further information 
call (617) 773-6100, ext. 
4016. 



Mariano Wants Gambling Revenue 
Used To Relieve Water-Sewer Rates 



State Rep. Ron Mariano 
has filed legislation to 
create the Commonwealth 
Sewer Rate Relief Trust 
Fund aimed at bringing 
fiscal relief to water and 
sewer ratepayers of 
Massachusetts. 

Anticipating the 
potential legalization of 
excursion boat gambling, 
Mariano called for all 
revenues reaped by the 
Commonwealth to be 
directed to the trust fund. 

"If legalized gambling 
prevails, then the revenues 
should be used to relieve 
the painful strain of the 
Harbor cleanup on the 
Massachusetts economy 
and the budgets of 
everyday people," said 
Mariano. 

Governor Weld has 
proposed that all revenues 
from floating casino 
gambling be used to fund a 
megaplex facility in 
Boston. 



Mariano cited the need 
to change this thinking. 

"In view of the modest 
monies coming from the 
Federal and State 
governments for these 
mandates, it is incumbent 
on the Legislature to find 
innovative ways to bring 
relief to ratepayers. Using 
gambhng money may be 
one of those ways. It is 
time that the Governor 
readjust his priorities, 
monies from floating 
casinos in the Harbor 



should go towards its 
cleanup." 

Although excursion boat 
gambling has yet to be 
legalized, Mariano said he 
feels that proactiove and 
aggressive steps like this 
legislation should be taken 
to insure the constructive 
use of such revenue. 

Sav« Gas and Money 
Shop Locally 



Apollo Lighting & Electric 
Supply Company 

South Shore's Lighting Headquarters 

jj A Full Line Lighting and 

/ ^ \ Electrical Distributor 
^ Lamp Shades • Lamp Repairs 

vj Mrs.: Showroom Mon-Sat 9-5 Thurs9-8 
li. Supply Counter Mon-Pri 7-5 Sat 8-5 

767-5000 

476 South Franklin St., Rt. 37, Holbrook 



How to buy 



BancBoston Mortgage 

Bhie Hills Office Park Auditorium 

150 Royall Street 

Canton, Ma. 

August 10 7-10 PM 

August 11 7-10 PM 

1-800-248-6005 Call for reservations. 



Buying your first home isnt ns hard ns you think. When you have experts 
available to help answer your questions and guide you along the way, the 
process can be an easy one. 

BancBoston Mortgage loan officers are offering this free, no obligation seminar 
designed to explain how home financing really works - from qualification to 
application to closing. 

So, if you are in the market now for your first home or even wonder if home 
ownership is a possibility for you, we welcome you to join us. 



A Bank o( Boston Company 




CELEBRITY TOMATOES-Paul O'Shea of Bass St., WoUaston io his garden with Us 
celebrity tomatoes. He named each plant with that of a celebrity or friend, including 
President Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton, Mayor James Sheets, Liz Walker and his dog, 
Gamba. He has been growing tomatoes for 20 years and shares his harvest with 
neighbors. 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Chretien Proposes Electric, 
Natural Gas Cars For City 



(Cont'd From Page 1) 

in Massachusetts are 
experimenting with it. He 
said he wants the city to 
be a leader in the 
movement. 

"Within the next couple 
of years, this technology 
will be up and running. I'd 
rather be a bit ahead than 
a bit behind," he said. 



He said vehicles fueled 
by natural gas and 
electricity make the most 
sense in this area because 
they are readily available 

in the eastern part of the 
United States. Turning to 
AFYs would also spur new 
infrastructure including 
new fiiel stations. That in 



turn would generate more 
jobs locally, he said. 

Chretien is confident 
AFVs are feasible in 
Quincy. "The technology 
is here. It's just a matter 
of time. If the city leads 
the way, there will be a 
snowball effect. It'll start 
small and just get bigger 
and bigger." 



t-^searin'5 




BIG SIDEWALK SALE 

Flowers & Crafts 

10-50% Off Many Items 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 19: 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 20: 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 
SATURDAY, AUGUST 21 : 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 



!l(pseann s 



1091 9{ancoc(<iStTcet, Qyincy, 9v(A 02169 

(across from the Woodward School) 



(617) 773-4353 



JoAN's Olympic Gym 

- Gymnastics And Dance School - 

• Gymnastics • Dance • Aerobics 

Now Accepting Fall Registration s 

* FALL SPECIAL - All New Students Receive A FREE TRIAL LES SON 

The Best Professional Instruction In: 




• Gymnastics 

• Gym Tots 

• Dance 

• Aerobics 

• Physical Training 



All Ages - All Levels 

Girls & Boys - 2 years old and up 

Ballet, Tap and Jazz - 2 years old and up - Ail Levels 

For Ladies 

For Boys 

Profession al Training with Oly m pic Apparatu s 

Our programs are designed to Build Self Confidence, reduce fear, and 
develop physically at an early age while having fun at the same time! 



Call NOW 
To Enroll 

843-9624 

* Fail special for 
a limited time only 

Asl< for our 
FREE BROCHURE 



Eat. 1983 

197 Quincy Ayc. 
Braintree, HA 

Plenty of 
FREE PARKING 

843-9624 



Visit Us 
At Our 

I Ith Annual Open House 

Saturday Sept. I Ith 

I I am to 4 pm 

FREE DEMONSTRATIONS 

Fall Classes Start 

SEPT. 13th 1993 



"An excellent Edurational Environrn'-nt for Your Child" 



Page 4 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 5, 1993 



OPINION 





USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock SI . Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh Jr , Publisher 
Robert H Bosworlh Editor 



30* par copy. $12.00 par yaar by mail in Quincy 
$14.00 par yaar by mail outaida Quincy. $17.00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston, Mass. 

Postmaster Send address change to 
The Ouincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St . Ouincy. Mass 02169 



Tha Ouincy Sun attumas no linincial responsib.iily lor 
typogriphicil •rrors m ■dvarliMmenls bul will reprint that 
part of an advar|:teirani m which the typographical error 
occurs 



*A^- 



Central To Mark 
100th Anniversary 



Central Middle School 
will celebrate its lOOtb 
anniversary this coming 
school year. 

On Sept. 12, 1893, the 
building opened as Quincy 
High School. Since that 
time it has also served as 
a junior high school and 
now as a middle school. 

Donald McCarthy, 
anniversary committee 
chairman, held a meeting 
at the home of Mary Lou 
Fishman. Attending this 
planning session were 
Ruth Flaherty, Mary 
Catherine lannoni, Louis 
DiMartinis and Mrs. 



Fishman. 

The next meeting will 
be held at Central 
Thursday, Sept 30. 

Central School - Home 
Association officers are: 
President Bonnie 
Ashworth; Vice President 
Beverly CuUen; Secretary 
Mary Lou Fishman and 
Treasurer Karen Miranda. 

Plans are underway for 
a Family Day, an open 
house and other possible 
observation to be shared 
with students, their 
parents, members of the 
staff, former students and 
former members of the 
staff. 



BUY 

UNITED SJAIES 

SAVINGS 

BONDS 




c 



Medically 
Speaking 



by Michael M. Bakerman, M.D., FA.C.C 




GIVING VOICE TO 

One of the hardest parts 
of coping with larynx cancer 
can be the loss of the "voice 
box" arxl the ability to speak 
normally. However, a new 
treatment alternative is 
making it possible for some 
patients to keep their lar- 
ynxes - and their voices. In 
extensive trials sponsored 
by the U.S. Department of 
Veterans Affairs, cases of 
larynx cancer were treated 
with two courses of che- 
motherapy. A laryngectomy 
was performed if the tumor 
dkini respond well, but if 
the chemo progress was 
good, the larynx was left 
intact arxj a tiiird cycle of 
chemotfierapywasordered. 
Radiation therapy com- 
pleted the treatment Sur- 
vival rates of patie nts treated 
in this way were similar to 
those wfioee larynxes had 
been removed. 

P.S. The new procedure 



AN ALTERNATIVE 

is not advisable for every 
patient, but it does offer one 
more option for some can- 
cer patients. 

[doctors hope that in the 
future fewer and fewer 
laryngectomies will t>e nec- 
essary. If you would like to 
iearn what you can do to 
stay healthy and ward off 
dangers of heart attacks, 
feel free to call any of the 
doctors — myself. Dr. Lisa 
Antonelli, or RonakJ Dunlap, 
at COMPREHENSIVE 
CARDIAC CARE at 472- 
2550. If necessary, we will 
refer you to another medi- 
cal professional. Office 
hours are by appointment 
We have more parking at 
our new office, located in 
Crown Cotony, 700 Con- 
gress St., Suite 2C, in 
Quincy. I am affiliated wHh 
Quincy Hospital and South 
Shore Hospitals. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



A No. 1 Baseball Fan 



Sam Shellman, who was Quincy's first black 
political candidate 61 years ago apparently had 
another distinction: 

Quincy's No. 1 baseball fan. 

Our item here about Shellman running for the City 
Coimcil at-large in 1932 and finishing 19thinafieldof 
20 candidates, brings a letter from reader J. Thomas 
MuUaney of Standish Ave., Wollaston. 

"You might be interested to know," he writes, "that 
Sam Shellman was a great baseball fan. In fact, he was 
such a great fan that local teams would delay the start 
of their games so Sam would not miss any of the game. 

"These games were played at Upper Merrymount 
Park, which was one of the primary baseball fields in 
Quincy at the time. It was not unusual for the crowd to 
be 2,000-5,000 people. The local teams, I believe, were 
City League clubs with neighborhood fans. 

"The game could not start until Sam Shellman could 
get his Wollaston barbershop closed and hurry up to 
Merrymount Park. The crowd would cheer Sam as he 
hurried in from right field. Everyone knew that the 
game could now begin because Sam arrived. 

"Sam always had a good seat reserved for him. 
While he was very popular with the baseball fans, there 
was another reason for the VIP treatment he received 
from the local teams. 

"When they passed the hat to collect money to 
subsidize the teams, Sam was the most generous con- 
tributor. 

"As I have lived all my life (58 years) on Standish 
Ave. across from Merrymount Park, I grew up hearing 
positive stories about Sam Shelhnan. 

"I can remember my father and mother telling me 
stories of Sam and all the fine teams and games played 
in Merrymount Park. 

"Sam was black and he was highly respected in 
Quincy. 

"Not bad for a so-called racist city. 

"P.S. 1 would love to see some company or organi- 
zation sponsor a Sam Shelhnan team in the Little 
League or some other youth group to honor a fine 
gentleman who loved baseball." 

Sounds like Sam was quite a guy. But where were all 
those baseball fans on election day? 

U 

FRIDAY IS LOTTERY day at City Hall. 




The names of the nine candidates 
for School Committee will be drawn 
to determine their position on the pre- 
liminary election ballot Sept. 14. 

City Clerk Joseph Shea will pre- 
side over the drawing at 3 p.m. 

The nine School Committee candi- SHEA 

dates are incumbent Ron Mariano. Sean Barry, JoAnn 
Bragg, Christine Cedrone, Gregory Hanley, Toni 
Kabilian, Ronald McCarthy, John McDuff and John 
Spada. 

The preliminary election will determine which six 
of the nine candidates will make it to the Nov. 2 final 
election. 

There were not enough candidates for councillor at- 
large and ward coimcillor to warrant a preliminary 
election for those seats. And, of coiuse, Mayor James 
Sheets is imopposed. 

In the final election, the candidates will be listed 
alphabetically with incumbents first and challengers 
after them. 



CONGRATULATIONS to 
the Quincy Elks' Tom Shepherd on 
his selection as the Massachusetts Elk 
of the Year. He was recognized for his 
contributions to the city of Quincy 
and to the Quincy Lodge of Elks. 
SHEPHERD G 

A POOL PARTY fimdraiser for Councillor Tim 
Cahill is planned for Monday, Aug. 9. But you don't 
have to bring your swimsuit 

This is a pool shooting party to be held at the 
Shooters Qub, in Quincy Fair Mall, Quincy Center 
from 6 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $10 with free pool and 
pizza. 

G 
A SUMMER PARTY for JoAnn Bragg, candidate 
for School Committee, is set for Thursday, Aug. 12 
from 7:30 to 10 p.m. at Coddington's at President's 
Place, Quincy Sq. Tickets are $20 per person. 

G 
OBSERVATION via the Quincy Kiwanis Club 
newsletter (and from wherever they got it): "Sometimes 
the fool who rushes in gets the job done." 




Recycling Committee Announces 
New Tree Planting Initiative 



The Recycling 

Committee is beginning a 
new tree planting program, 
announces committee 
chairman and Ward 3 
Councillor Larry Chretien. 

"Recycling committee 
volunteers are committed 
towards improving our 
existing recycling and 
composting programs. 
However, we have decided 
to broaden our 
environmental protection 
efforts into the area of tree 
planting," Chretien said. 

"The city's forestry 
department does not have 
the resources it needs to 
plant as many trees as it 
we need or want At the 
same time ttiat die forestry 
budget is tight, in the 
normal course of a year, 
areas of the city become 
devel<^d and many trees 



get cut down without being 
replaced. 

"So by using 
volunteers," Chretien said, 
"we hope to supplement 
the operations of the 
forestry department." 

The chairman said the 
recycling committee hopes 
to get more citizens 
actively involved in 
protecting the 

environment. "We intend 
on having a lot of fiin with 
this program and we think 
that it will be a great way 
to involve school 
children." 

Over the next few 
weeks, volunteers will be 
working out the program 
details. They will form a 
partnership with Mayor 
James Sheets and the 
forestry department. 

Chretien said the 



program may begin 
modestly with a few 

plantings in the fall. 
"Hopefully, we will 
expand as time goes on, 
much in the same way that 
we began the recycling 
program. 

"Eventually, we might 
even be able to establish a 



volunteer- based city tree 
nursery, but steps will be 
taken one at a time," he 
added. 

Anyone interested in 
joining the initiative can 
call Chretien at 472-1400. 
He said a meeting will be 
held in the near future to 
discuss the program. 



Red Cross Blood Drives 



•Thursday, Aug. 19 from 
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at The 

Patriot Ledger, 400 Crown 
Colony Rd. 

•Monday, Aug. 23 from 
1 to 7 p.m. at Quincy Point 



Congregational Church, 
444 Washington St. 

•Tuesday, Aug. 31 firom 
9 a.m. to 2 pjn. at Arbella 
Insurance, 1100 Crown 
ColonyRd. 



©IMiedWs^ 

(FMASSACHUSETTSEA^ 



Thursday, August 5, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 5 



Union Head Applauds Sheets, Council 
Opposition To MBTA Privatization 



Quincys 



By MICHAEL WHALEN 

The president of the 
union representing workers 
of the Metropolitan Bay 
Transit Authority has 
called a resolution passed 
by the City Council last 
week opposing Gov. 
William Weld's proposed 
privatization of the MBTA 
a "major victory" for all 
who work for and support 
the authority. 

Carmen's Union 
President Richard Murphy 
said that the MBTA Board 
of Directors has 
procrastinated in holding 
any public bearings 
regarding Weld's plan and 
other avenues must be 
explored in order to take a 
stand on the issue. 

"This (City Council) 
vote is a major victory for 
the riders, taxpayers and 
workers involved with the 
MBTA," said "The Board 
of Directors has ignored 
calls for public hearings 
before any subcontracting 
is undertaken so it's up to 
the City Councils, mayors 
and other elected officials 
to take action. 

"This is just first such 
'Resolution Opposing 
Service Reductions'. ...The 
Carmen's Union will be 
joining with concerned T 
riders in all 79 cities and 
towns to oppose 
privatization of public 
transportation." 

Mayor James Sheets 
said last week that he, 
also, is in full support of 
the resolution. The mayor 
said that privatization 
would have a detrimental 
impact on the quality of 
service that the MBTA 
provides its users. 



"I'm opposed to 
privatization," said Sheets. 
"My major concern is that 
we may be looking at a 
back door way to cut out 
certain (bus) lines along 
the South Shore. We have 
to make sure we have 
adequate service and 
maintain the quality of 
service that we've always 
had." 

Sheets added that while 
it may be true the city 
could save money from 
privatization, the reduced 
services that would likely 
result would not be worth 
it. 

The City Council voted 
7-1-1 to support the 
resolution, which was 
introduced by Council 
President Charles Phelan. 

"We have a public 
agency (MBTA) that 
sometimes we may have 
disagreements with, but 
we have adequate input 
regarding its actions," said 
Phelan. "I wonder, if we 
add privatization, if we'll 
have the same voice." 

Other councillors 
agreed. 

"One of the basic 
mandates of government is 
to provide for the public 
good," said Ward 4 
Councillor Thomas 
Fabrizio. 

"I don't think there's 
any great benefit (to 
privatization)," said Ward 
1 Councillor Peter Kolson. 
"I stand firmly behind this 
resolution." 

Ward 2 Councillor Ted 
DeCristofaro.wondered 
about "the number of jobs 
that would be lost" in the 
case of MBTA 



privatization and made a 
motion that the council 
vote in favor the 
resolution. 

Jim Lydon, recording 
secretary of the Boston 
Carmen's Union, 

expressed his hopes that 
the council give the 
resolution its support. 

Councillor Timothy 
Cahill, however, said that 
said that while 
privatization can 
sometimes be detrimental 
in some cases, it can also 
be beneficial in others. 

"We've spent the last 
few months trying to save 
money, and I have to look 
at both sides," said Cahill. 
"I don't know how I can 
vote on this when I don't 
have all the facts. It 
doesn't mean that I support 
Weld's privatization plan, 
but I can't support this 
(resolution) as it is 
tonight." 

Councillor Joseph 
LaRaia said that while 
"there have been abuses in 
privatization as well as 
public service," there is 
"more accountability" in 
public service and voiced 
support of the resolution. 

Councillor Michael 
Cheney, who is employed 
by the MBTA, abstained 
from the vote. 

A number of MBTA 
employees carrying signs 
saying "Privatization = A 
Weld Scam" outside the 
City Council Chamber, as 
well as others seated 
inside, applauded 
enthusiastically after the 
vote was taken. 

The resolution, which 
calls for "the city's 
representatives on the 



MBTA Advisory Board to 
take all actions necessary 
to stop the ill-advised 
campaign of MBTA 
privatization," will be sent 
to Weld and the general 
advisor of the MBTA after 
it is signed by Sheets, 
according to Phelan. 

Administrative 
Assistant Bernice Mader, 
the city's representative on 
the MBTA board, 
expressed sentiments 
similar to Sheets' and said 
she will urge the board to 
oppose the privatization. 

The privatization plan 
has been proposed an 
attempt to cut MBTA 
costs. A recent 
consuhant's report for the 
authority showed that the 
MBTA ranked second only 
to Seattle as having the 
second-highest bus 
transportation costs among 
28 systems in the country. 

The report, which was 
filed by Comsis Corp. of 
Silver Springs, Md., 
projects no layoffs but 
indicates that attrition 
would produce cost 
savings. It also stated that 
private contracting should 
be increased to include 
about 25 percent of all 
MBTA bus lines as 
unionized bus drivers and 
mechanics are lost through 
attrition. 



Under 


t h e 


recommendations 


of the 


report, the first 


routes 


affected by 


the 



pnvatization would be in 
Lynn and Salem, followed 
by those at Ale wife 
Station in Cambridge and 
Quincy Center. 



Quincy Early Childhood Program Available 

The chapter I program September. 

Those children eUgible 

for a place in the program 

must turn four years old by 

31, 1993 and live in 



of the Quincy Public 
Schools announces the 
availability of an Early 
Childhood Program for 



Dec. 



the Lincoln Hancock,. 
Point Webster or Sung 
Harbor School district. 

To have an eligible 
child screened for the 



program 
guardian 



a parent 
must call 



or 
the 



chapter I office at 984- 
8942 by Aug. 23. 



G 



• !• i 



NEWS QUINCYi 




Our city, in cooperation with BFI, Browning-Ferris industries, has 
expanded its recyclabie materials to inciude the foliowing 

items* 

HOUSEHOLD PAPER MIX 



JUNK MAIL 

MIXED OFFICE PAPERS 

MAGAZINES 

SHREDDED OFFICE PAPERS 

NOTE PAPER 



• COPY PAPER 

• DRAWING PAPER 

• PHONE BOOKS 

• BOXBOARD 

(e.g. Cereal Boxes, etc ) 



THE FOLLOWING CANNOT BE ACCEPTED AT THIS TIME. 
PLEASE DO NOT PLACE IN RECYCLING BIN 






NO PLASTIC COATED PAPERS NO NAPKINS 
NO CARBON PAPER NO PAPER CUPS 

NO TISSUE NO PAPER PLATES 

QUESTIONS? If you have any questions regarding the recycling 
program, please call the Quincy DPW HOTLINE at 770-BINS. 



Yesterdays 



Deer Island 

Bill To End 

Bay Pollution? 

A triumphant coiKlusion to a 25-year fight to end pollu- 
tion in Quincy Bay appeared in sight as the House passed and 
sent to the State Senate a bill that would eliminate Moon 
Island as a sewage disposal plant and transfer its operations 
to Deer Island. 



Aug. 5-11, 

1951 

42 Years Ago 



It was estimated that be- 
tween 40 and 1 35 million gal- 
lons of raw sewage was 
dumped each day into Quincy 
Bay from the Moon Island 
Plant, which served the Bos- --—-----------------—. 

ton sewer system. 

The House bill calls for construction of a deep rock tunnel 
from Columbia Qrcle in Boston to Deer Island, where a 
complete sewage treatment plant similar to the one at Nut 
Island would be built. The $ 1 5 million Nut Island Plant was 
e^)ected to be finished in October. 

Rep. William W. Jenness of Quincy secured the inclusion 
in the bill a provision to connect Squantum to the Metropoli- 
tan sewer system since the elimination of the Moon Island 
Plant would have left the peninsula with no sewage outlet. 
The bill also provided for the inclusion of Boston into the 
South Metropolitan Sewage District, a move that would 
reduce Quincy 's proportional assessment in the district 
LONG ISLAND BRIDGE 
Labor secretary Maurice J. Tobin officially dedicated the 
new 3.5 mile $2 million bridge and viaduct between Moon 
Island and Long Island, which replaced the feny boat that 
had plied the strait between the islands for 65 years. 

Tobin said he hoped that the bridge would be the forerun- 
ner of aseries of bridges linking the harbor islands and taking 
some of the South Shore Traffic load off Quincy Streets. 
QUINCY-ISMS 
All members of the City Council except Mayor Thomas 
S. Burgin filed for re-election — Carl W. Anderson, Edna B. 
Austin, David J. Crowley, Amelio Delia Chiesa, Alfred G. 
Helfrich, Frank N. Orcutt . . . Noreen McDonald, 19, and her 
sister, Ann, 18, both of 104 Grove St., West Quincy, were 
among seven South Shore teenagers rescued after their 18- 
foot Hustler was disabled by a broken main halyard in 
Quincy Bay . . . Frankfiirters were 65 cents a pound and 
haddock 19 cents a pound at the Mohican Maiket, 29 
Chestnut St. . . . Deputy Sheriff Joseph T. Hunterof 119Elm 

Ave., Wollaston, died on vacation in New London, N.H., at 
the age of 59 . . . Staff Sgt. Ellen C. Bremner, 24, daughter of 
Mr,, and Mrs. William B. Bremner of 10 Wedgewood St., 
North Quincy, was the only woman stationed at the U.S. Air 
force base in Goose Bay, Labrador . . . Old Indian Ale was 12 
quarts for $2.90 at the Quincy Market Wine and Spirits Co., 
18 Chestnut St . . . The Rev. Francis Owen Hagerty, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Hagerty of iS Cummings Ave., 
Wollaston, left for missionary duties on the island of Jamaica 
. . . Richard Widmaric was starring in "Halls of Montezuma" 
at the Lincoln Theater in Quincy Point. . . The temperature 
sank to 54 degrees, only two degrees above the record low for 
Aug. 6 set in 1881 .. . Dennis F. Ryan, newly named cleik 
magistrate of Quincy District Court, withdrew nomination 
papers for re-election to the School Committee . . . Members 
of the Quincy Chapter of Widows of Worid War I met at the 
home of Mis. Agnes O'Neil, 291 Newbury Ave., North 
Quincy, to discuss an invitation to attend the state convention 
Sept. 16 at the Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston . . . Vice 
President George Rogers of Local 5 at the Fore River 
Shipyard reported a unanimous vote among members to 
raise the monthly dues from $2 to $3 with 50 cents of the hike 
going into the strike fund . . . There was dancing Friday and 
Saturday nights to the music of Frankie and his Musical 
Masters at Besser's 11 99 Sea St., Houghs Neck . . . George 
C. Scrimshaw, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Scrimshaw of 23 
Blake St., Wollaston, was appointed an instnictorin anatomy 
at Tufts Medical School . . . William Jacobs, 14, Robert 
White, 11, and Walter Donero, 11, all of Manet Ave., 
Houghs Neck, rowed out 100 yards to rescue Mrs. Winifred 
Rockwood, who became exhausted while swimming. 




If .S5£!!TI?1'®®^*** ^ "* U.S. Post Office in 1847 bore 
the portraits of George Washinqton and Benjamin FranWin. 



Page 6 Quincy Sun Thursday, August 5, 1993 




Marie* s 
Kitchen 



By MARIE J. D'OLIMPIO 



Bean Casserole 



Our nephew John and his wife Brenda 
invited us to their home for a cookout 
recently and one of the things of their 
menu was a bean casserole from 
Brenda 's mom. It is such a good fill-in 
at cookouts that we have been enjoying 
it since. 

Bean Casserole 
From Mom Kusay 
1 can baked beans 
1 frozen package lima beans 
1 can red kidney beans 
1 chopped onion 



4 slices bacon (fried and 
crumbled) 

Combine all of the above and 



mix ui: 



1/3 cup sugar 
1 tablespoon 



Worcestershire 



sauce 



1/3 cup ketchup 
1/2 cut shredded Cheddar 
cheese 

Place in a casserole dish and bake in a 
350 degree oven covered for a half hour, 
then uncovered for another half hour. 
This recij)e serves six. 




Daniel 
Quincy is 
chairman of 



Daniel Ferrara Don Bosco 
Class Of 1984 Reunion Chairman 

Quincy. 



CHRISTINE CEDRONE of Quincy, a student at Suffolk University, was recently 
inducted into the Sigma Lambda Chapter of Phi Sigma Alpha, the National Government 
Honor Society. With her are Michael Ronayne, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences at the University (left) and Dr. John Berg, professor and chair of the 
government department. 



Ferrara 
serving 



the 



of 
as 
10th 



armiversary reunion for the 
Don Bosco Class of 1984. 
The reunion will be 



held next spring. The 
committee is seeking the 
new addresses of members 
in order to inform them of 
the event. 

Among those assisting 
Ferrara is Sean Kirby of 



Barbara Coghlan Nominated 
For National Caring Award 



For more information, 
class members are asked 
to call the school at 
4269457 or Ferrara at 328- 
6227. 



Lalla EIHassani-ElAIaoui Wentworth Grad 



Lalla H. ElHassani- 
ElAlaoui of Quincy 
recently received an 



associate in engineering 
degree in computer 
engineering from 



Wentworth Institute of 



Technology in Boston. 



Barbara Coghlan of 
Quincy, director of the 
Council on Aging and 
creator of SHARE food 
distribution, has been 
nominated for a 1993 
National Caring Award by 
the Caring Institute in 
Washington, D.C. 

The purpose of the 



Domcnii M.Slnizzulla, A/D 

E\'c Physlcuin and Suivcon 

(1 



We have 
moved, but 
our focus 
hasn't 
changed! 



Currently accepting new patients. 



Dr. Domenic Slrazzulla and 
his staff are pleased to 
announce the relocation of 
their ophthalmic offices. We're 
in the same building, on the 
same floor — our offices have 
just moved around the corner! 
Our address and phone 
number remain the same. 

This move vAW allow us to 
better serve our patients with 
state-of-the-art, quality eye 
care in a more spacious and 
comfortable environment. 



Domenic M. Slrazzulla, MD 
Crown Colony Office Park 
500 Congress Street 
Suite lA-1 
Quincy MA 02169 
(617) 770-1505 



Providing state-of-the-art 
eye care, now and into the 
rature: 

M caliiract <;urgery 

■ lens implants 

M in-oilicc lastr surgery 

■ iredtmcnt for glaucoma and 
dialxrlic eye di5e«ist» 

D?, ^trazitdla H a hmrd wrtifitd 




RECEPTION HALLS 




FLORISTS 



Flowers by Helen 

367 BILLINGS ROAD 

WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02170 

Flowers For All Occasions 

Specializing in Weddings 

471-3772 

Certified Wedding Consultants 






jabl« 



Quint's 
Florists 

761 So. Artery 
Quincy 

773-7620 



MUSIC 



PHOTOGRAPHER 



Photography , 

679 Hancock StrMt. Quincy 

(Wollaston) 

479-6888 



BAKERY 



O'BRIEN'S 
BAKERIES 

9 Beale Street 
Wollaston 
472-4027 




JEWELRY 



Poison "'••'tewelry 

Quality and Integrity a Tradition 

The Cotetti Family Al - Dave - Maik« 

730 HANCOCK ST.. WOLLASTON 02170 786-79C 



awards, which are 
presented annually, is to 
identify adults and young 
people who have 
demonstrated extraordinary 
compassion and caring, to 
find mechanisms that 
reinforce these qualities, 
and to create peer role 
models. 

The Caring Institute 
receives nominations by 
asking community leaders 
to identify the most caring 
person they know. In 
addition to Coghlan, eight 



other Massachusetts 
residents have been 
nominated this year for the 
honor. 

The Caring Institute's 
Board of Advisors will 
select 10 adults and 10 
young people from the list 
of nationwide nominees to 
receive the award in 
October. Awards will be 
presented at a special 
ceremony Dec. 3 in the 
Senate Caucus Room on 
the Capitol grounds in 
Washington, D.C. 



5 Residents On 
Wentworth Dean's List 



Five Quincy residents 
were recently named to 
the Dean's List for the 



spring semester at 
Wentworth Institute of 
Technology in Boston. 
The students and their 

Sav« Gat and. Money 
Shop- Locally 



majors are: 

Kevin M. 
computer 



Capobianchi, 
science; 



Lawrence A. Connors, 
building construction 
technology; Suzanne M. 
MacNeal, facilities 
management; Khaled S. 
Al-Mejren, mechanical 
engineering technology; 
David K. Scott, 
mechanical engineering 
technology. 




BEAUTY & SKINCARE 



Our Policy On 

Engagement Photographs 

And Wedding Announcements 



The Quincy Sm W&i eotttitHlftl^p!U|^li$It|^ 
tographs with esga^eiaeuit aimounccmejotfi as it 
always lias. 

The Sim will also cc«jliai»e to use in wedding 
aaaouncements the names of all membets of tt» 



best mm^pmtB^^ MSssamSs^ mbtxs, flower 
etc. 



We invite etj^ga^ couple* to &vfyB% 




i:'i 










"^^mm^^m^i^ii^pmi^MA- 




Thursday, August 5, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 7 



Quincy Partnership 
Harbor Cruise Aug. 10 



The Quincy Partnership, 
Inc. will hold its second 
annual "Midsummers 
Night Cruise" on Tuesday, 
Aug. 10 

The reception, at 
Marina Bay, begins at 
5:30 p.m., with the boat 
boarding at 7:00 p.m. Cost 
is $25 per person with the 
proceeds directed toward 
the establishment of the 
Abigail Smith Adams 
Statue, to be placed in 
Quincy, on her 250th 
birthday in 1994. 

The MA^ Massachusetts 
leaves Marina Bay at 7:30 
p.m. for a two-hour cruise 
around Boston Harbor. 



Tickets are available at 
the following Quincy 
locations or call Maureen 
Rogers at the South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce, 
479-1111: 

South Shore Chamber 
of Commerce, 26 Miller 
Stile Rd., Curry Hiudwiue, 

370 Copcland St and 53 
Billings Rd.; Rogers 
Jewelry, 1402 Hancock 
St.; Barry's Deli, 21 Beale 
St.; Barry's Ship Haven, 
1237 Hancock St.; Feenan 
Financial, 40 Willard St.; 
Quincy Historical Society, 
8 Adams St. and Quincy 
Continental Cablevision, 
81 School St. 



Catholic Women's 
Club Meeting Sept. 9 



The Catholic Women's 
Club of North Quincy will 
hold the first meeting of its 
1993-94 season Thursday, 
Sept. 9 at the Atlantic 
Neighborhood Center, 
Hunt St. 

New members are 
welcome. 

The club recently held 
a board meeting at the 
center to plan for the new 
season. A buffet dinner 



was served by new 
President Mary Blake. 

Other officers for the 
year are Annette 
Radzevich, first vice 
president; Arlene Ryan, 
second vice president; 
Frances Langille, 
secretary and recording 
secretary, and Peg Foley, 
treasurer and financial 
secretary. 



Pamela Francoeur 
Trail Crew Volunteer 

Pamela Francouer of Accessible only by boat, 
Quincy has been selected Isle Royale contains 
by the Student innumerable lakes, fjord- 
Conservation Association like harbors, and intimate 
(SCA) as a member of a coves. It is home to one of 
volunteer trail crew this the few remaining wolf 
summer in Isle Royale populations in the lower 48 
National Park, Mich. Jtates. 

This volunteer crew, Francoeur is one of 

under the supervision of ""ore than 450 high school 

trained SCA leaders, will students taking part in 

work on campsite SCA's program at national 

restoration and trail parks, national forests, and 

maintenance projects, other land management 

They will also assist with areas nationwide. Through 

the investigation and the SCA program, young 

stabilization of people help governmental 

archaeological areas at agencies to manage and 

Todd Harbor and Little preserve our nation's rich 

Todd Harbor campsites, natural resource heritage. 

11 Quincy Students 
On Thayer Honor Roll 



Thayer Academy lists 
11 Quincy students on its 
third term honor roll. 

They are: 

High Honors: Brendan 
Gibbons, Kevin Langley, 
Amy Yuen Man Lau, 



Rachel Shea. 

Honors: M. Elizabeth 
Brandon, Sarah Brandon, 
Scott Dunn, Kristine 
Foley, Elizabeth Ginns, 
Christie-Jade Rizzo, Karla 
Sanchez. 




ZUHAYR HEMADY. M.D. 

DIPLOMATE. AMERICAN BOARD OF ALLERGY IMMUNOLOGY 

FORMERLY 

NOBILI ALLERGY CLINIC 

ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS OFFICE 

AT 

1261 FURNACE BROOK PARKWAY 

SUITE 33 

QUINCY. MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

PRACTICE LIMITED TO 

ALLERGY. ASTHMA. AND IMMUNOLOGY 



TELEPHONE: 472-71 I 1 




OUTGOING QUINCY HOSPITAL Auxiliary President 
Marie Wilkinson presents a $40,000 check to Nell 
Stroman, chief operating officer of the hospital. The 
money raised through the auxiliary's fundraising 
activities will be used to enhance patient services at the 
hospital. 

Beechwood Board Elects 
Two New Members 



MR. and MRS. MARK KELLY 

(Hobbs Studio) 

Elaine Quirk Wed 
To Mark Kelly 



Elaine M. Quirk, 
daughter of Mrs. Alfred P. 
Quirk of Dorchester and 
the late Alfred Quirk, was 
recently married to Mark J. 
Kelly. His is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul C. Kelly of 
Quincy. The Nuptial Mass 
was celebrated at St. Ann's 
Church in Neponset and 
officiated by Fr. Robert 
Carr. A reception followed 
at Omni Parker House in 
Boston. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her brother 
Alfred P. Quiric Jr. 

Mary Ellen Quirk of 
Dorchester served as the 
Maid of Honor. 

Bridesmaids were 
Grace-Marie Kelly of 
Quincy, sister of the 
groom; Camilla McGill of 
Quincy; Ellen Doherty and 
Maureen Landers of 
Dorchester and Michelle 
Crilley of South 
Weymouth, cousin of the 
bride. 



Paul S. Kelly of 
Quincy, brother of the 
groom, served as Best 
Man. 

Ushers were David 
Quirk of Dorchester, 
brother of the bride; John 
Connelly of Canton; Ed 
Cunningham of 

Dorchester; John 

Addonizio of Everett and 
Jack Reardon of 
Providence, RI. 

The bride, a graduate of 
Arbishop Williams High 
School, Providence 
College and Suffolk 
University, is a mutual 
fund reporting manager for 
Fidelity Investments. 

The groom, a graduate 
of Boston College High 
School and Boston 
College, is attending New 
England School of Law 
and is a claims adjuster for 
Cigna. 

Following a wedding 
trip to Aruba, the newly 
weds are living in Quincy. 



The Board of Directors 
of Beechwood Community 
Life Center recently 
elected two new members. 

They are Frank Miller, 
owner-operator of 
Wollaston Market, and 
Julie McCarthy, a 
community parent-activist. 
"Frank Miller is a well- 
known altruist and 
businessman, and Julie 
McCarthy is noted for her 
neighborhood, school and 
community work," said 
Executive Director Shanon 
Seals. 

Beechwood is a city- 
wide, multi-purpose 
community center, guided 
and developed by a 
volunteer Board of 
Directors. Board is broadly 



representative of the 
community. It takes pride 
(as a non-profit service 
provider) in operating 
primarily on "earned 
revenues." 

Quincy is unique among 
Massachusetts 
communities, to have a 
multi-purpose Community 
Center that is primarily 
self-supporting, said Burke. 

"The City has been very 
helpful, providing essential 
direct and technical 
assistance to the eleven 
year development and 
operation of Beech wood's 
programs and services. 
However, the Board of 
Directors is responsible for 
policy making and general 
oversight." 



Kimberly Galvin On Dean's List 

Kimberly Galvin, for the spring semester, 
daughter of Joan and Greg Kimberly is a business 

Galvin of Quincy, has management major 

been named to the Dean's starting her senior year in 

List at Suffolk University the fall. 



MEASURABLE 
ADVERTISING! 



SPONSOR 



Welcome Wagon directs 
prospective customers to 
your door with personal- 
ized, measurable adverti- 
sing to: 

• Engaged Couples 

• New Parents 

• Moving Families 

We reach them in their 
homes, usually by request, 
when they're in a buying 
mood. We tell them all 
about your business. 
Interested? Call for more 
details: 

Barbara Nawrot MerKiflz 
479-2587 



NEWSCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun liome delivery 
route. 

Telepiione: 471-3100 




Summer Clearance 

25-50% Off Selected Items 

Think of Us for Showers and Weddirtgs! 

OPEN YEAR ROUND 

Open Tues.-Sal. 10-5, Closed Sundays & Mondays 

3 853 Hancock St., Quincy 479-9784 



Russell Edward's 



A full service hair salon 



MONDAY H^ 
Women's Special 

TUES & THURS 
Men's Special 

WEDNESDAY 

Perm Special 

Starting at 



$20.00 
$1 3.00 



Starting at $42.00 Nall Tipping & overlay $60 

All specials include wasti, cut and blowdry. Sculptured Nails $60 

Long hair slightly higher Pedicures $25 

Body & Facial Waxing Available 

We carry a full line of hair care products 

REDKEN KMS ^IMS pBULMiTcii ELL ymatfix 




472-1060 

Corner Hancock, Chestnut Sts., 1 Maple St., Quincy 



Page 8 Quincy Sun Thursday, Xuffist 5, 1993 



Arts/Entertainment 



Flutist, Guitarist To Perform 
At United First Parish Sunday 



Flutist Virginia Sindelai 
and guitarist Bent Strong 
will perform Sunday at 3 
p.m. at United First Parish 
Church, 1306 Hancock St., 
Quincy Square. 

The performance is part 
of the Presidents Church 
Summer Concert Festival 
presented by the 
Scarborough Chamber 
Players and is sponsored 
by The Cooperative Bank, 
the Quincy Historical 
Society and United First 
Parish Church. 

Sindelar and Strong will 
play music from the time 
of John Adams and John 
Quincy Adams, including 
works by Bach, Loelliet, 
Coste and others. 

Also on the program is 
Ed Fitzgerald, director of 
the Quincy Historical 
Society, who will present 
information on the Adams 
family and music both in 
America and in Europe 
that they were likely to 
encounter during their 
political assignments 
abroad. 

Sindelar, who booked 
all of the entertainment for 
Quincy 's 1993 First Night, 
is founder and artistic 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14 BEALE ST 773-4600 




VIRGINIA SINDELAR 



WED&THURSAUG. 4&5 

Sylvester Stallone 

"CLIFFHANGER" (R) 

Action-Adventure 
EVE'S 7:00 ONLY 



STARTS FRI AUG. 6 

Gary Busey- Eddie Bracken 

"ROOKIE OF THE YEAR" (pg) 

A Comedy Fantasy 

FRI & SAT 7:00 & 9:15 

SUN-THURS 7:00 ONLY 



MON & TUES DOLLAR NIGHT 



ALL SEATS $3.00 



director of the Scarborough 
Chamber Players. She 
presents Quincy 's Multi- 
Cultural Series of Concerts 
September through April, 
the Presidents Church 
Summer Music Festival at 
First Parish, the Bethany 
Mid-Week Concert Series 
with co-director Joanne 
French at Bethany 
Congregational Church, 
and other related cultural 
projects. 

In an effort to reach out 
to teens through music, 
Sindelar, with the 
sponsorship of Impact 
Quincy: Coalition for 
Prevention of Alcohol and 
other Drug Problems, also 
produced First Rock '93 at 
the Quincy Armory. She 
has compact disc 
recordings on the Titanic 




NOW! 

A Complete Laser Video Disc 
Library At Your Fingertips 
If you have a laser disc player 
you can now easily select any 
disc in print by joining our club. 
Members receive our current 385- 
page catalogue listing over 7,000 titles 
which are dis- 
counted 10 per 
cent. 

Order now and 
receive a free copy 
of Laser View 
Magazine (a $2.50 
value) with your 
first laser disc or- 
der. 
Send only $6.25 (includes tax) 

plus $1.95 for shipping to: 

Laser Sights, P.O. Box 3392 

Boston, Ma. 02101. 

(Allow 2 to 4 weeks for delivery) 



* Laser 

^^■File . 



^.*^'..^. 




and Centaur labels and has 
produced numerous 
performing arts programs 
for cable television. 

Strong, a top prize 
winner of the 1988 Guitar 
Foundation of America 
Competition , is a top 
prize winner of the 1988 
Guitar Foundation of 
America Competition, is a 
graduate of The New 
England Conservatory of 
Music and the Hartt 
School of Music. As 
artistic director of the 
Boston Guitar Society she 
presents a series of 
concerts each year 
featuring nationally and 
intemationally.famous 
guitarists. Strong has 
toured Hungary, 

Yugoslavia, Denmark and 
Italy. 

Tickers are $7, $5 for 
children and seniors. Those 
attending may also 
participate in 

Cultureshare, a special 
program offering free 
admission to any adult 
who brings a child. For 
information and 

reservations call 328-0677. 

©UnitedW^ 

^^ It hrinns ftut tbp hf'sl in ,tll of uy 




Our Own Homemade 
SEAFOOD 
CHOWDER 

FRESH nSH 



Your CtMtoe ol 
BralM or Fried 

Everyday 8p«ci«l 

OpanBrMkfad 
Evoryday Excapl Sunday 

HOURS 
Mon-Sat 6 a.m.-Q p.m. 





STORYTELLER CAROLE DUHAMEL will appear with her puppet, Sparky, at the 
Thomas Crane Public Library, Quincy Square, Tuesday, Aug. 10 at 7 p.m. 

Storyteller Carole Duhamel 
At Crane Library Aug. 10 



Storyteller Carole 
Duhamel will appear at 
the Thomas Crane Public 
Library, Quincy Square, on 
Tuesday, Aug. 10, at 7 
pjn. 

Duhamel's performance 
is intended for children 
age five and older and 
adults. 

The program is 
supported, in part, by the 
Quincy Arts Council, a 
local agency, the 



Massachusetts Cultural 
Council, a state agency, 
and the National 
Endowment for the Arts. 

Duhamel is a gifted 
storyteller, Her Down East 
stories, told with just the 
right twang, are among her 
most popular. Her delivery 
and pacing are sure to 
bring laughter to any 
audience. 

She is also a talented 
craftsperson and a 



perceptive handwriting 
analyst. Duhamel is a 
children's librarian in the 
Brockton Public Library 
system. 

The program is the fifth 
in the Quincy Library's 
summer storytelling series. 
Duhamel will be followed 
Aug. 17 by the Poobley 
Greegy Puppet Theater 
who'll present "Going, 
Going Gone Whaling." 



Mid- Week Concert Series 
Continues At Bethany Aug. 11 



Organist Peter Krasinski 
will be the guest artist 
Wednesday, Aug. 11 at 
12:15 p.m. at the Mid- 
week Concert Series at 
Bethany Congregational 
Church in Quincy Center. 

The concerts are 
presented through the 
collaboration of the 



Friends oi Bethany 
(Joanne French, 

coordinator) and 

Scarborough Productions 
(Virginia Sindelar, artistic 
director). 

Krasinski was a semi- 
finalist in the American 
Guild of Organists' 
National Convention in 
Organ Improvisation in 



1992. He has appeared at 
Mechanic's Hall and All 
Saints in Worcester and 
the Methuen Memorial 
Music Hall in Methuen. 
He is also a music teacher 
in the Brookhne Public 
Schools. 

The free concert will be 
followed by an optional 
$2.50 luncheon. 



HN Community Center 
Trip To Fenway Park Aug. 19 



The Houghs Neck 
Community Center, 1193 
Sea St., is running a trip to 



SAVE GAS 

AND MONEY.. 

SHOP LOCALLY 



Fenway Park on Thursday, 
Aug. 19 at 5:45 p.m. for the 
7:30 p.m. Red Sox- 
Cleveland Indians game. 

This is a youth group 
ticket night and the center 
has 16 tickets available for 
kids under the age of 16, 
and four chaperone tickets. 
Fee for bus and game is 
$6. Return time will be 
approximately 1 1 :30 p.m. 



To sign up, call Patricia 
Shea Ridlen at 376-1385. 

The Houghs Neck 
Community Center will 
conduct another Red Sox 
game night Wednesday, 
Sept. 1. First come first 
signed up. 

To reserve tickets call 
the week of Aug. 2. 
Tickets can be picked up 
and purchased the week of 
Aug. 9. 



SAME DAY SLIDES 

(E-6 PROCESS) 
only at 

Photo Quick of Quincy 

1 363 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

472-7131 




QUINCY RESIDENT Joan Burkett was recently honored 
for five years of service at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute 
by John W. Pettit, chief administrative ofHcer. The 
ceremony recognized 164 Institute staff members who 
have served a total of more than 1,550 years. The 
Institute is part of a cross-country network of 
comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National 
Cancer Institute. The Institute is also a federally 
designated center for AIDS research and is a teaching 
afniiate of Harvard Medical School. Dana-Farber is 
home to the Jimmy Fund. 

Rev. John Swanson 
Completes Navy Course 



Police Log Hot Spots 



Monday, July 26 
Break, 12:36 a.m. Freddy's Cycle Center, 92 
Franklin St. Nothing taken. 

Break, 8:01 p.m. 233 Common St. Apartment 
broken into 

Tuesday, July 27 
Larceny, 8:07 a.m. 351 E. Squantum St. Garage 
entered, lawn mower taken. 

Thursday, July 29 
Break, 10:07 a.m. 81 Rawson Rd. Victim reports 
hearing screen door close about 1 a.m. Awoke to find 
purse missing from table. 

Attempted Break, 6:43 p.m. 61 Water St. Attempt 
made to enter apartment. 

Friday, July 30 
Attempted Break, 12:47 a.m. 1020 Southern 
Artery. Security guard heard a noise and found a 
ladder against a building. Suspects fled. 
Saturday, July 31 
Attempted Break, 12:28 a.m. 61 Grafton St. 
Resident reports a male party broke a window in an 
attempt to gain entrance. Suspect fled. 
Services for the Week 
Total calls for assistance: 1306 
Total arrests: 65 
Total stolen cars: 8 

If you have any information on any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please contact the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext. 312. You will not 
be required to identify yourself, but it could help. 

9 From Quincy Win 
Senior Games Medals 



Thursday, August 5, 1993 Quincy Sun Page 9 

Jim Burm Family 
Benefit Dance Aug. 20 



A benefit for the family 
of Jim Burm will be held 
Friday, Aug. 20 at the 
Morrisette Legion Post, 
Miller St., Quincy. 

Burm died recently at 
the age of 32, leaving his 
wife, Tina, and three 
children. Raised in 
Quincy Point, Burm 
attended Quincy schools 
and lived in Quincy and 



Braintree most of his life. 
The benefit dance is 
being put together by a 
group of Burm's friends. 
Disc jockey Mark 
McGilhcuddy will provide 
entertaitunent. 

Admission to the dance 

Tickets are available by 
calling Marty Grant at 
843-1353 or Stella 
Mahoney at 472-1533. 



The Rev. John 
Swanson, interim pastor of 
Union Congregational 
Church, Rawson Rd., 
Wollaston, recently 
completed the Navy's 
Unauthorized Absence and 
Deserter Intervention 
course held in Norfolk, Va. 
The three-day course 
dealt with the multi- 
faceted problem of 
unauthorized absences and 
desertion from the Naval 
service which each year 
cost the government 
millions of dollars and 
drastically affects 



operational readiness. 

The course entailed 
classes in the 

psychological profile of 

the deserter, the legal 
issues involved in the 
handling of UA/Deserter 
cases, and tours of the 
Navy Brig. 

Rev. Swanson is a 
senior lieutenant in the 
Navy Reserve and is 
chaplain for the Coast 
Guard's Long Island Sound 
in New Haven, Conn. 



Nine Quincy residents 
won medals in the recent 
Massachusetts Senior 
Games. 

Georgette Nickerson 
won five medals in 
swimming, winning the 
gold in the 100 meter 
backstroke, silvers in the 
100 meter freestyle, 200 
meter backstroke and 50 
meter backstroke, a bronze 
in the 200 meter freestyle 
and also qualified in the 
50 meter fireestyle. 

Richard Buckley won 
four gold medals and a 
bronze, winning the gold 
in the 100 meter fi-eestyle, 
50 meter freestyle, 
racquetball and shot put 
and a bronze in the high 
jump. 



Robert Carlson, Edward 
Condon, Romano DePaoU, 
Edward Kelly, James 
Normoyle and Richard 
Straley teamed up to win 
the bronze in volleyball. 

Save Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



WEIGHT TO LOSE??? 
NO NEED TO WATT! a 



ALL NATURAL, SAFE & EFFECTTVE 

100% GUARANTEED 

Only 2 simple easy steps to follow. 

"/ know the program works! 

I lost 33-112 lbs. in only 13 weeks." 

Norman 

"I have tried many diets and this is the 

only one that has worked for me. I lost 49 lbs. 

in only 17 weeks . I am so elated. " 

Karen 



Great News! 

The newest product has finally arrived. 

It's exciting. It's amazing. 



Mail Orders Accepted 
NORMAN I. NISENBAUM, B.S. 

Registered Pharmacist 

215 Samoset Ave.-Quincy, MA 02169 

CALL (617) 471-1963 




POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT POUTICAL ADVERTISEMENT POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT 



ELECT 

John 
Spada 

QUINCY 

SCHOOL 

COMMITTEE 



John, Marie, Elizabeth 

EDUCATION: 

• UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS B.A. MANAGEME